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Cleveland: Public Square Redesign

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APA's 2018 Great Places in America: Cleveland Public Square

 

Planning Excellence

 

Public Square is the physical and historic center of Cleveland, but for decades it was crossed by two major roads, dividing it into four smaller squares. A recent redesign has remade it into a grand gathering space in the center of downtown.

 

ublic Square was laid out in Cleveland’s original plan from 1796 by surveyors from the Connecticut Land Company. As part of Connecticut’s “Western Reserve,” the town was planned in the form of a traditional New England town. Public Square was the site of many historic events: President Lincoln lay in state there when his funeral train came to town, and the first electric street lights in the world were lit in 1879. Despite its history and central location, Public Square was not an appreciated space, serving primarily as a transit depot to connect from one streetcar line to another.

 

Two roads crossing through Public Square resulted in a space designed for cars, not people. A central part of the space’s 2016 redesign was the closing of Ontario Avenue to traffic and the reduction of Superior Avenue from 77 feet wide to 48 feet. This redesign created two larger rectangular public spaces, promoting pedestrian use with new paving materials that create a distinct public space.

 

The previous four quadrants of Public Square were merged into a single, cohesive public park with vehicle access restricted to buses, intended for use throughout the year with a range of programs and events. The new Public Square creates a space that is inviting and flexible, and landscape creates a soft colorful space that invites people in and encourages them to stay. The northern half includes a green sloped lawn.

 

Well-suited for casual everyday use, this design also creates a natural amphitheater for events like movie nights and concerts. The southern half of Public Square is a hardscape plaza that includes a cafe and seating, a speaker’s terrace, the Soldiers and Sailors Monument, and a mirrored-fountain water feature. This same space is transformed into a skating rink in the winter months.

 

MORE:

https://planning.org/greatplaces/spaces/2018/publicsquare/

 

Other winners:

https://planning.org/greatplaces/

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APA's 2018 Great Places in America: Cleveland Public Square

 

Planning Excellence

 

Public Square is the physical and historic center of Cleveland, but for decades it was crossed by two major roads, dividing it into four smaller squares. A recent redesign has remade it into a grand gathering space in the center of downtown.

 

ublic Square was laid out in Cleveland’s original plan from 1796 by surveyors from the Connecticut Land Company. As part of Connecticut’s “Western Reserve,” the town was planned in the form of a traditional New England town. Public Square was the site of many historic events: President Lincoln lay in state there when his funeral train came to town, and the first electric street lights in the world were lit in 1879. Despite its history and central location, Public Square was not an appreciated space, serving primarily as a transit depot to connect from one streetcar line to another.

 

Two roads crossing through Public Square resulted in a space designed for cars, not people. A central part of the space’s 2016 redesign was the closing of Ontario Avenue to traffic and the reduction of Superior Avenue from 77 feet wide to 48 feet. This redesign created two larger rectangular public spaces, promoting pedestrian use with new paving materials that create a distinct public space.

 

The previous four quadrants of Public Square were merged into a single, cohesive public park with vehicle access restricted to buses, intended for use throughout the year with a range of programs and events. The new Public Square creates a space that is inviting and flexible, and landscape creates a soft colorful space that invites people in and encourages them to stay. The northern half includes a green sloped lawn.

 

Well-suited for casual everyday use, this design also creates a natural amphitheater for events like movie nights and concerts. The southern half of Public Square is a hardscape plaza that includes a cafe and seating, a speaker’s terrace, the Soldiers and Sailors Monument, and a mirrored-fountain water feature. This same space is transformed into a skating rink in the winter months.

 

MORE:

https://planning.org/greatplaces/spaces/2018/publicsquare/

 

Other winners:

https://planning.org/greatplaces/

 

It’s a great space if you overlook the concrete slabs obstructing the flow.

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Its incredible how long its taking the city to proceed or find someone to pay for these bollards... I guess Key nor Huntington Bank are willing to hand out any more money.

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They really should go with the most expensive option since they finally decided that they really don’t want pedestrians any where near traffic. That wasn’t in the plans for this option that they decided on if one thinks back to the 4 final submissions. I thought the tunnel option would’ve been best if they were worried about pedestrians, which they obviously were. I’m not sure public sq could handle any more serious delays and digging at this point.

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What else needs to be done?

 

Install the bollards, as planned. Then they can get rid of those awful jersey barriers.

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