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Cleveland: Little Italy: Development and News

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The key line in this article:

 

Perotti said the zoning code would make sense in a suburb, but not on a busy city street where virtually all other buildings -- filled with apartments and offices set over restaurants, cafes and galleries -- come right up to the sidewalk.

 

 

Cleveland's zoning code is ridiculous given its existing built form, and what qualities make for desirable urban development.  Come on, form based zoning!

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Was driving down Edgehill the other day and noticed "something going on" just west of the townhomes that line the cliff (that were built about 10 years ago).  The work was being done closer to the older houses near the curve just before the intersection of Murray Hill and Cornell.  Curious if this is just some utility work or the construction of a house or houses.  I just got a fleeting glance but it looked like they were bracing the cliff for more homes (but I could be wrong).  Anybody have any information?

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Approved!

 

Little Italy condos win approval

Posted by Steven Litt/Plain Dealer Architecture Critic

April 29, 2008 14:38PM

 

The controversial condominium tower proposed by developers Tim and Edward Perotti for Mayfield Road at East 119th Street in Little Italy won approval Monday at the Cleveland Board of Zoning Appeals.

 

"There was a lot of drama," Tim Perotti said. "It wasn't until the end (of the meeting) that we felt like we were going to win the day."

 

The board voted to accept the six-story, $6 million project as it was, without requesting design changes, even though some residents in Cleveland's Little Italy neighborhood felt the building would be too high and too bulky for its site...

 

more at: http://blog.cleveland.com/architecture/2008/04/little_italy_condos_win_approv.html

 

 

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Cool. I hope his final design is better than his first one. Gotta have that street-level retail, coffee shop, etc. considering its location next to where the RTA station will be located.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Check out the proposed new Coltman Road Townhouses, 1850 Coltman Road, on the Cleveland Landmarks Commission agenda....

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/landmark/agenda/photo/050808/index.php

 

Question is, how many parking spaces do these townhouses need? Two parking spaces are in each townhouse's garage, with two more head-in parking spaces on the street. Why the head-in spaces?? Teach the kids how to parallel park -- or walk -- for crying out loud.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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^If you zoom in on the really small/gray writing on the site plan, I think it says that the "head-in" parking spaces are "privately controlled parking".  I suppose that explains it?

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Bringing in the dough

Credit crunch does not stymie Little Italy developer’s plans

By STAN BULLARD

4:30 am, December 8, 2008

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20081208/SUB1/812059933/1072&Profile=1072#

 

http://27coltman.com/

 

With most plans for real estate development stored in the deep freeze until credit markets thaw, a proposed $10 million townhouse project is cooking in Cleveland’s Little Italy, near University Circle.

 

Taking its name from the planned number of townhouses and its Coltman Road location, the 27 Coltman project has snared something that eludes many developers today: construction financing. Cuyahoga County records show the project proposed by Little Italy Preservation Partners LLC recently received a $5 million loan from KeyBank.

 

Ask Andrew Brickman how he and his two partners secured a construction loan at a time when lenders are super wary, and he credits the win to the project’s “location, quality of product and vision.”

 

Partner Justin Campbell describes the location as the “cultural epicenter of Cleveland.” It is in the dynamic Little Italy neighborhood, within 900 steps of the landmark Presti’s Bakery on Mayfield Road and just east of the city’s concentration of cultural, educational and health care institutions at University Circle.

 

Moreover, the project borders the University Circle rapid transit station, which the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority plans to replace as part of a $4 million project designed to garner transit-oriented development nearby. The new HealthLine bus-rapid line connecting the Circle and downtown Cleveland also is next to the site’s triangular point at Coltman, East 119th Street and Euclid Avenue.

 

The project consists of two- to four-bedroom townhouses ranging from 1,700 to 3,400 square feet and costing between $299,000 and $499,000 each. Designed by Lakewood architect Scott Dimit, 27 Coltman will have a contemporary look with eco-friendly bamboo floors, granite countertops, large windows and wide open rooms.

 

Mr. Brickman, Mr. Campbell and their partner, contractor Nathan Barrett, are doing 27 Coltman as an encore to their last joint venture, the Brownstones of Derbyshire in Cleveland Heights. That 30-unit project, launched in 2006, is sold out, with its most expensive unit snagging a price of $750,000.

 

Townhouse and condominium projects may be the dreariest category in Northeast Ohio’s beleaguered residential real estate sales reports, but Mr. Brickman said his trio has another thing in its favor: economic incentives.

 

Buyers who work for University Circle institutions are eligible for a buyer incentive program that provides a grant for as much as $15,000, which can serve as a down payment. Buyers also are eligible for KeyBank’s urban assistance mortgage program that slices one-and-a-half percentage points from typical 30-year mortgage rates. There also is Cleveland’s most potent incentive: 15 years of residential property tax abatement.

 

Even so, the office-broker-turned-residential-developer is aware of the risks in today’s bleak climate.

 

“I’m glad we only have to sell 27,” Mr. Brickman said. The developers plan to start work on the site by month’s end.

 

In today’s lending environment, “securing financing for a condominium project is something to be very proud of,” said Mark Jablonski, a principal of Great Lakes Resources of Cleveland. Mr. Jablonski draws on a background as a bank lending analyst and Ernst & Young real estate consultant to do studies for city neighborhood groups and to develop urban shopping centers for his own portfolio.

 

Bringing it home

Keith Brown, founder of the Progressive Urban Real Estate brokerage of Cleveland, which has a focus in urban homes, sees 27 Coltman’s allure.

 

“If it’s going to work anywhere, it’s going to work there,” Mr. Brown said. “You’ve got all the job growth at University Circle that brings people into Cleveland who can buy without having to sell their home here first. You can walk to Little Italy restaurants and drive to nearby grocery stores.” Moreover, due to its urban location, the project has less recently constructed townhouse competition than in outlying suburbs, Mr. Brown said.

 

The developers also have devised a novel way to overcome a marketing challenge for the project — namely, that the site is visible from Euclid but far enough from Mayfield to miss the busy weekend dining trade. They’ve just completed a model center in a Mayfield storefront. With a new bamboo-wood storefront on the outside and bamboo floors and trendy furniture on the inside, the center lacks the stacks of carpet and tile or faucets typical in builder sales centers.

 

“We wanted to do something different from the traditional sales center,” said Mr. Brickman, who already lives in Little Italy. The tony sales center with a plasma screen PowerPoint displaying the project’s selling points reflects the work of Mr. Campbell, who owns Brandtechnique in Solon, a consultancy in branding for the upscale market.

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The web site and design of these condos is stunning, in my opinion.

 

It's definitely one of the better developer web sites.  I like the design overall, but I am not a fan of the mostly blank ground floor front facade....what's up with that?  Is it a privacy thing to have only those little windows up high?  Can't they just put up curtains or blinds like the rest of us?

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I am not a fan of the mostly blank ground floor front facade....what's up with that? Is it a privacy thing to have only those little windows up high? Can't they just put up curtains or blinds like the rest of us?

 

That's a common feature of a lot of recent construction.  I think it's to create a sense of privacy and security.  Seems geared more toward local suburbanites than those looking for a traditional rowhouse.  I also hate the little landscape buffer around everything... but there's a lot to like about this project and I'm optimistic.     

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I am not a fan of the mostly blank ground floor front facade....what's up with that?  Is it a privacy thing to have only those little windows up high?  Can't they just put up curtains or blinds like the rest of us?

 

That's a common feature of a lot of recent construction.  I think it's to create a sense of privacy and security.  Seems geared more toward local suburbanites than those looking for a traditional rowhouse.  I also hate the little landscape buffer around everything... but there's a lot to like about this project and I'm optimistic.     

 

Its like that in many new construction townhouses in various cities.  NOT just Cleveland.  :roll: :roll:

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The issue with the townhouses is that the first floor is predominantly taken up by garage and mechanical, not the type of thing you want a ton of windows into.  It's nice if you can create an entry on a half level between the ground floor and the first floor to give some sense of relation to the pedestrian.

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Its like that in many new construction townhouses in various cities. NOT just Cleveland.   :roll: :roll:

 

Undoubtably, but they also get other new projects with traditional styling.  Check out the Columbus E Gay St thread.  Why can't we do something like that once in a while?  Plus, other cities haven't torn down as much of their original building stock.       

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The issue with the townhouses is that the first floor is predominantly taken up by garage and mechanical, not the type of thing you want a ton of windows into.  It's nice if you can create an entry on a half level between the ground floor and the first floor to give some sense of relation to the pedestrian.

 

I hear ya, but for these units, the front room on the ground floor is described on the floorplans as work/sudio- it's not garage or mechanical.  The room is going to be dark no matter what because it's under the terraces, but those tiny high windows make the ground floor streetscape look more cheap motel than luxe condo.  From http://27coltman.com/:

 

homeImage1.jpg

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hey now.

 

those are pretty groovy looking.

 

they have kind of a throwback 60's jet age vibe.

 

and that's the way to put the roof to use!!!

 

no worries mr. brickman, they'll sell just fine.

 

23988M~Austin-Powers-Posters.jpg

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Luxury townhouses planned for Little Italy in Cleveland

Posted by Michelle Jarboe/Plain Dealer Reporter

December 08, 2008 16:26PM

 

http://blog.cleveland.com/business/2008/12/luxury_condominiums_planned_in.html

 

 

Developers have snagged a $5 million construction loan and plan to break ground soon for 27 townhouses in Little Italy.

 

Launching a residential project now might seem risky at best and, at worst, a tad insane. The housing slump has driven new home construction to its slowest pace in decades, and developers in Northeast Ohio and nationwide are shelving plans until the credit crisis is over.

 

But Andrew Brickman, a partner in Little Italy Preservation Partners LLC, just opened a design and sales center across from Presti's Bakery on Mayfield Road...

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If I could pick anywhere in town to live, it would be in this area.  So I'm just glad they're doing all this new housing there.  I like these and I like the other ones too.  That stretch of Euclid is going to look very different in a few years and the new stuff mostly looks good on paper. 

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IMO, best website I've yet seen for a CLV project.  I really like what I've seen in terms of finished work (townhomes on East Derbyshire) from architect Scott Dimit.

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Not a fan of the parking arrangement represented in the rendering.

 

I also greatly prefer the Derbyshire style over these modern-boxy designs.

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Not a fan of the parking arrangement represented in the rendering.

 

I also greatly prefer the Derbyshire style over these modern-boxy designs.

 

I don't like the parking arrangement either..

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LITTLE ITALY PRESERVATION PARTNERS ANNOUNCES

27 COLTMAN LUXURY TOWNHOMES IN LITTLE ITALY

 

design centre opens, groundbreaking ceremony to be scheduled soon.

 

Cleveland, OH – December 11, 2008 – Situated in one of Cleveland’s most vibrant neighborhoods,

officials at Little Italy Preservation Partners (LIPP) announced 27 Coltman, its newest luxury

townhome project in Little Italy on Monday, December 8th. 27 Coltman, a $10 million private

gated community will feature 27 fee simple luxury townhomes.

 

With financing secured through KeyBank, Andrew Brickman, Partner, is enthusiastic about 27

Coltman’s prospects. “We already have several commitments from buyers, and the response from

the community, thus far, has been extremely encouraging. We feel, by adding 27 Coltman to the

neighborhood’s fabric, we’re going to make Cleveland’s best neighborhood even better.”

 

In anticipation of the soon to be scheduled groundbreaking, the 27 Coltman Design Centre opened

in the heart of Little Italy at 12026 Mayfield Road between Gustos and La Dolce Vita. Designed

with the same eco-friendly passion, the 27 Coltman Design Centre is a timeless “warm modern”

design, with an open space floor plan and contemporary finishes.

 

location

 

Situated on Coltman Road between Mayfield Road and the new RTA ‘Healthline’ on Euclid Avenue,

27 Coltman Luxury Townhomes is at the epicenter of University Circle’s world class cultural, educational,

and medical communities. Various entertainment, fine and casual dining, shopping, public

transportation, and recreational opportunities are just around the corner throughout Little Italy.

 

economic and financial incentives

 

Buyers, who meet certain conditions, are also able to take advantage of the many financial

incentives being offered.

 

• 15 year 100% tax abatement is provided by the City of Cleveland

• Up to $15,000 in forgivable loans available to apply towards down payment or closing costs

through the Greater Circle Living Program

• 1.5% below market fixed interest rates for 30 years through KeyBank’s Urban Assistance

Program for qualified applicants

• $7,500 first time owner’s tax credit from the federal government

 

For additional information about Little Italy Preservation Partners and 27 Coltman, please contact

Justin Campbell at 216.870.4442 or Andrew Brickman at 216.965.4514.

 

about little italy preservation partners:

 

Little Italy Preservation Partners, award-winning team responsible for The Brownstones at

Derbyshire in Cleveland Heights, develops first-class luxury housing and mixed-use properties both

locally and internationally. Well-capitalized and creative in working with lenders to secure

financing, LIPP ambitiously plans to break ground on their newest project, 27 Coltman, in early

2009. LIPP believes in exceptional product quality, architectural design, and customer service. To learn more about 27 Coltman, visit www.27Coltman.com.

 

###


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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I moved the messages that I could confirm were related to the 27 Coltman project.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Here's a link for WCPN, where Rick Jackson conducts a short interview with the developers.  Audio.  Text below.

 

http://www.wcpn.org/index.php/WCPN/news/15708/

 

Condo Boom In Little Italy

Posted Sunday, December 14, 2008

Topics: Economy, Other

 

 

 

In the face of a collapsed housing market, new construction has almost come to a standstill in parts of Ohio. An exception emerged last week though, from Little Italy...a neighborhood that's part of Cleveland's "University Circle" area. Activity is planned in Little Italy, where new, high-dollar condos seem to be the choice of developers. ideastream®'s Rick Jackson reports.

Llittle Italy is known for its galleries, shops, dining...and its history as home to the stone cutters and craftsmen who for decades built much of Cleveland’s most elegant buildings.  now Little Italy appears to be on the verge of another building boom.  Local developer Andrew Brickman is poised to break ground on a high-end condo development with a special look.

 

BRICKMAN: “A lot of the influence comes from the products that are being done in the top cities in Europe and South America where you’ve got people are living in the cities, because the cities are older.

 

Brickman’s project is attracting attention for another reason. it has secured a $5 million loan from cleveland’s Key bank.  Key bank community lending manager Paul Ettorre says it makes sense depsite the long slide in the housing market.

 

ETTORRE: “We are very bullish about the University Circle area.  We believe it is a dynamic growing area of the city and we’re excited to continue to participate.”

 

There are a number of incentives in play to lure buyers.  The city of Cleveland will give tax abatements ....that translates into no city real estate tax for 15 years; Key Bank will make loans through a special urban loan program that provides reduced interest rates; and buyers who are employed by University Circle businesses can get home purchase grants of up to 15-thousand dollars.

 

Many buyers will need the extra boost because these condos are expected to be priced at nearly one half million dollars. Building partner Justin Campbell is optimistic. 

 

CAMPBELL: “There is an audience out there that will respond to it; and Cleveland is a sophisticated city, and is looking for something like this. being located here in little italy with all the cultural institutions, the medical community - I think you’re going to have a captive audience that will respond to this.”

 

It’s a bold move; in an uncertain economy.

Rick Jackson, 90.3.

 

 

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Is there any interest in the Mayfield?  Can't it be restored into some decent apartments or something?  Have developers shown any interest?  God it is so horrible looking among everything.

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Is there any interest in the Mayfield?  Can't it be restored into some decent apartments or something?  Have developers shown any interest?  God it is so horrible looking among everything.

 

Talk is that it would take at least $1 mil to get it back to its glory. 

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^I just think it would be a great investment.  One of the things LI surely lacks is modern apartments.  I would think it would be an absolute boon for anyone who can shell out the money.

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Is there any interest in the Mayfield? Can't it be restored into some decent apartments or something? Have developers shown any interest? God it is so horrible looking among everything.

 

Talk is that it would take at least $1 mil to get it back to its glory.

 

 

 

I agree that the Mayfield is really a black eye for Little Italy, and it has been like that for as long as I can remember.  I cant believe that it hasnt been more of a priority for the Community Development Corporation there(unless Im unaware of something).  They are managing to move on similar projects in other neighborhoods that are costing quite a bit more.  They also managed to get the support of foundations and the city. 

 

So a quick rundown of the others would indicate that 1 million would be a small price to pay in comparison......

The Variety on Lorain is going to cost at least 8 million (they have raised part of that and are moving forward) they are adding apartments and storefronts, then there's the Capital Theater in Detroit Shoreway which is costing 7 million, and finally the La Salle on E.185 which will cost 1.4 million to restore. 

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Is there a feasible market for this building, as a theater?  Shaker Square and the Cedar Lee are stiff competition within the market area, and the theater at Coventry has gone through several iterations, seemingly struggling to make a go of it.  The Play House and university theaters probably don't leave much market for a live theater.  The neighborhood might want to consider restoring the facade to its' former glory but demolishing the rest of the building and constructing a parking garage, disguised from the street as a theater with vehicular access from the alley at the back.  I have no idea if the theater is worth saving/restoring or not.  A new Mayfield RTA station will be great, but the neighborhood businesses would do much better with more plentiful parking available.  This building is long and narrow, tucked up closely to other buildings.  There is little opportunity to provide decent views, so a residential or office conversion might not have a lot of selling points.  Reliable parking is quite possibly the limiting factor to neighborhood growth in Little Italy, both from a commercial and residential standpoint.  Without the reliable, convenient (yet somewhat hidden) parking decks, Coventry & Cedar Fairmount would not be what they are today.  A parking garage is probably a more reliable way to pay for itself than a theater restoration.  The conversion to a parking deck could help reinvigorate the rest of the neighborhood - potentially a palatable trade off.

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Yeah, there may not be much of a market for movie theaters , with all the others either operating, struggling or in progress.  And you can only have so many "arts" theaters.  What about performance space where performing arts groups can lease and perform/practice, or is that also overdone.... 

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Yeah, there may not be much of a market for movie theaters , with all the others either operating, struggling or in progress. And you can only have so many "arts" theaters. What about performance space where performing arts groups can lease and perform/practice, or is that also overdone....

 

Yeah .. I was wondering about that, too, actually. There has to be some kind of out-of-the-box kinda usage for spaces like this in Cleveland. It'd be such a shame to lose something like this.

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