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Masonic Temples

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The Carnegie library and city hall threads made me think of other buildings found in cities across the country.

 

Let's start with Dayton's Masonic Temple. Built in Dayton's heyday between 1925-1928 at a cost of $2.5 million, the Temple overlooks the Great Miami River and downtown Dayton on a hill next to the Dayton Art Institute.  Of the 450 builders who built the Temple, a majority were Freemasons themselves.  Col. EA Deeds (Delco, NCR) was a big part of Dayton Masonic community.

 

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Here are interior shots from its website at dmcohio.org.

These are of the Scottish Rite Auditorium.  Its pipe organ is to undergo restoration.

From this month’s Dayton Masonic Journal:

We also have a proposal for the complete restoration of

our world class and historically significant Skinner pipe

organ in the Scottish Rite Auditorium. A foundation

which specializes in helping to restore specifically pipe

organs like our Skinner has been contacted and we have

submitted a proposal for funding. Other foundations

interested in preservation of such historically significant

pipe organs are being contacted to determine their

interest in this project.

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The Commandery or Templar Room

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Notice the huge murals on the walls:

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Main Dining Hall

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Lounges as of January 2010.  From the Dayton Masonic Journal:

Bids are being obtained for the restoration and

refurbishment of the Great Lounge on the first floor.

Proposals are now being evaluated for selection of an

interior designer to assist with the restoration of the

lounge. Additional proposals for the repainting of the

lounge, restoration of light fixtures, electrical upgrades,

carpets, furniture updating are being solicited and

evaluated as received.

 

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this last photo is by "bkwdayton" on flickr: Masonic Temple Postcard

 

Here are some facts on the building: http://fortheloveofdayton.wordpress.com/2009/11/07/why-do-the-builders-build/

 

Interesting Facts

 

Timetable: Groundbreaking: July 20, 1925

Cornerstone laid: May 19, 1926

Building open: April 1, 1928

Construction time: Two years, nine months

Number of workers: 450, a majority of whom were Masonic Brethren

 

Cost: $2.5 million in 1926

Today’s Cost: Over $40 million

Style of Architecture: Grecian

Size of Lot: Approximately 8 1/2 acres

Dimensions of Building: 265 feet long by 190 feet wide by 80 feet high, equivalent to an 8-story building in height!

Cubic Space: 5 million cubic feet

Steel: 1,700 tons Cement: 85,000 bags

Sand: 6,540 tons Gravel: 13,500 tons

Stone: 55,000 cubic feet Bedford stone and 15,000 cubic feet hard limestone

Marble: 20 train carloads of Vermont, Alabama and Tennessee marble used for interior floors, wainscotings, partitions and stairways

Lime: 350 tons Plaster: 1,200 tons

Wire: 500,000 feet Brick: 2 millions bricks

Carpet: 5,000 yards Partition Tile: 1,600 tons Elevators: Two high-speed, self-leveling elevators

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wow, thats an usually cool one rob.

 

i always thought lorain had a bright, tidy masonic.

this a shot from an old thread ink did:

 

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great idea for a thread -- i hope people keep adding to it!

 

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Wow, two great building Robert and mrnyc.  What style would you call the Lisbon building posted by Robert?  The Lorain building is so bright and fine, looks like a giant piece of ivory carved by a giant.

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What style would you call the Lisbon building posted by Robert?

 

I'd consider it Richardsonian Romanesque, although it looks like the ground floor has suffered some unfortunate modifications.

 

Although not as grand as the other Masonic temples posted in this thread, I've always liked the little Masonic Lodge in my hometown of Fort Thomas, Kentucky (just across the river from Cincinnati):

 

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I love the Dayton Masonic Temple and it's grand & beautiful (no denying that!) but Springfield has a really neat looking Masonic Temple also.

I don't have a picture of it.

It looks like a castle if I'm not mistaken.

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Nice shots of Cleveland above.  Kent's is interesting too.  I'm always surprised by the variety of styles, but then again the are master builders.

 

I updated the first post with interior shots of the Dayton Temple.

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Very cool thread idea! 

 

Dayton and Lima's Masonic Temples are beautiful.  I'm not digging the exterior of Cleveland's, but those interior shots are awesome.

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Nice shots of Cleveland above.   Kent's is interesting too.  I'm always surprised by the variety of styles, but then again the are master builders.

 

I updated the first post with interior shots of the Dayton Temple.

 

I know the Cleveland one pictured here is the one on Euclid Ave downtown (actually in Midtown)...but there are also Masonic Temple buildings in Cleveland Heights and Lakewood.

Also, there is at least 1 abandoned Masonic Temple building (rather large, architecturally significant) in a Cleveland neighborhood that I know of. Maybe another one too , I'll have to find out.

 

Is this the same for any other Ohio cities?  To have more than one?

I'll try to get pics of these if the clouds/fog ever go away.

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The exterior photo of Cleveland's is unimposing, but the soot-shadows make it clear that it once had more elaborate ornamentation including cornices and columns.

 

The interior looks ... well ... WOW!

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The reason Cleveland's facade is so utilitarian is that it was never intended to be the front of the building.  Noticing the big setback from Euclid Avenue, you might wonder what's missing...

 

Here's what was intended back in the 1920's but never built:

postcards&CISOPTR=3974&DMSCALE=100.00000&DMWIDTH=750&DMHEIGHT=1600&DMX=0&DMY=0&DMTEXT=%20masonic&REC=11&DMTHUMB=0&DMROTATE=0

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The reason Cleveland's facade is so utilitarian is that it was never intended to be the front of the building.  Noticing the big setback from Euclid Avenue, you might wonder what's missing...

 

Here's what was intended back in the 1920's but never built:

postcards&CISOPTR=3974&DMSCALE=100.00000&DMWIDTH=750&DMHEIGHT=1600&DMX=0&DMY=0&DMTEXT=%20masonic&REC=11&DMTHUMB=0&DMROTATE=0

 

Quite possibly, Cleveland's was never finished because a mammoth one (i.e. Detroit) was just 2 hrs away by car.

 

 

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The reason Cleveland's facade is so utilitarian is that it was never intended to be the front of the building. Noticing the big setback from Euclid Avenue, you might wonder what's missing...

 

Here's what was intended back in the 1920's but never built:

postcards&CISOPTR=3974&DMSCALE=100.00000&DMWIDTH=750&DMHEIGHT=1600&DMX=0&DMY=0&DMTEXT=%20masonic&REC=11&DMTHUMB=0&DMROTATE=0

Quite possibly, Cleveland's was never finished because a mammoth one (i.e. Detroit) was just 2 hrs away by car.

The fate of Cleveland's temple shouldn't have been related to Detroit's since Masons use their temples quite often.  The 2 hr commute would not be attractive.

 

There are more grand rooms in Dayton's but I don't have pictures and there are none online.

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How 'bout some from Indiana? I'll add to this post as I unearth more in my archives:

 

Exquisite architecture in Bristol:

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The first floor is rented out:

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Decatur:

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Noblesville:

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From the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History: “In 1993 there were 11 Masonic temples in the Cleveland area—in Brooklin, Lakewood, Lyndhurst, North Olmsted, Shaker Heights, and Strongsville and in Cleveland on Lorain Ave., Kinsman, State Rd., and Franklin Blvd., as well as the Masonic Temple on Euclid Ave”.

 

Also in Clevelands  (these resemble aspects of Dayton's)..

The DeMolay Room and Exhibit Hall.  Then Lakewoods and then Ohio City 

 

 

 

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Labor and material costs are prohibitive.

^Correct.  I'm going to keep this in mind when people tell me how far we've progressed as a country.

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Indiana Freemasons' Hall

 

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From their website: The current Indiana Freemasons' Hall (originally the Indianapolis Masonic Temple) as it looked shortly after its construction and dedication in 1909. The building contains 113,000 square feet of floor space, originally holding four lodge rooms, four social rooms, a 7th floor complex dedicated to the York Rite of Freemasonry, a dining hall originally capable of holding some 300 people, two kitchens, a ballroom/banquet hall (with warming kitchen) with a capacity of perhaps 100-150, the Grand Lodge Hall with seating for 1,100, and a rooftop promenade deck where the Knights Templar drill team practiced and dances were once held under the stars. The building was designed by Rubush and Hunter Architects, who were responsible for a number of other beautiful Indianapolis buildings including the Murat Shrine, the Old City Hall, the Indiana and Circle Theatres, the Circle Tower, and the Columbia Club. The building is designed in a Greco-Roman Neo-Classical style and though Time has worked its inexorable will against its sturdy Indiana limestone, the Freemasons of Indiana still call it home nearly a century after it was built.

 

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Fiat lux!

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Temple Foyer

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Auditorium

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2nd floor banquet hall

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One of four lodge rooms

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The Ionic room

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Pillars of the Porch (I Kings 7:21) in the Ionic Room

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Beautiful Organ

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Social room, 5th floor

This is one of what were originally four social rooms adjoining the four lodge rooms on the 3rd and 5th floors. The 3 North social room has recently been ceded to the Grand Secretary's office for storage of Grand Lodge records. This picture is of the 5 South social room, which was completely redecorated in 2005 by Ancient Landmarks Lodge No. 319 under the direction of its then-Worshipful Master, Hal Grigdesby, with an overall design by Susan Colvin Interiors of Indianapolis.

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Royal Arch room, 7th floor

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Commandery Armory, 7th floor

This room is known as the Armory, and is the "anteroom" to the Red Cross Room and the Commandery Asylum. It is used for socializing before and after meetings. Hanging on the wall are composites of the Drill Teams of Raper Commandery No. 1 who attended (and still attend) the Triennial Drill Competitions. The oldest composite in the room is from 1910. There are trophies and other photos in the room going back to at least 1880.

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Red Cross Room, 7th floor

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Orator's station

A beautiful bronze speaker's lectern, won by the Raper Commandery drill team at the 1916 Triennial in Los Angeles, California, and suitably inscribed at the bottom.

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One of two sphinxes

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Ventilator detail 

Clearly a great deal of thought went into the decoration of this room! Even the ventilator grilles are designed to look like reeds on the bank of the Nile. 

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Exquisite Egyptian-theme detail on the light - look closely

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Knights Templar Asylum, 7th floor

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Ballroom, 8th floor

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And you thought the Freemasons just wore funny hats and drove little cars!

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And you thought the Freemasons just wore funny hats and drove little cars!

 

Well that, and the fact that they are part of the Illuminati!

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And you thought the Freemasons just wore funny hats and drove little cars!

 

Weel that, and the fact that they are part of the Illuminati!

That and the New World Order, how could I forget? 

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My hometown, Avon Lake, sports the ugliest Masonic Temple ever.  I don't have any pictures to share, though.

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I dont know.  The one in Lyndhurst is pretty ugly. 

 

Positively beautiful compared to Avon Lake's!  Here's a couple of Google Streetview screenshots.  Sorry about the quality

 

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Man Seth, that place is gorgeous.  I got a tour of the complex I posed up-thread, but I never got any photos of the inside.  I might ask for another tour so I can get some photos.  It's a lot like the Indiana Freemasons Hall you posted. 

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The Dayton Masonic Temple looks like Great Britain's House of Commons and House of Lords...

 

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Indianapolis has some beauties! The Indiana Freemasons Hall is beautiful, and the Scottish Rite Cathedral's beauty is shown off by its landmark location downtown.

 

Didn't the Scottish Rite Cathedral have a serious fire several years ago?

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The Murat Centre is one of the finest Byzantine structures in America.  It is owned by the Shriners and is in Indianapolis as well:

 

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The Dayton Masonic Temple looks like Great Britain's House of Commons and House of Lords...

 

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Agreed.  This might be the best hall I've ever seen.

 

From London:

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A couple more:

 

The venerable variety - Mount Vernon (on the right):

 

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The not-so venerable variety - Galion (courtesy of Google Street View):

 

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Miamisburg, where I grew up, has a cozy, little temple downtown on Second Street.  Completed in 1869, it was originally an Episcopal church and had a cupola on top.  That was removed and the front facade was added in 1901 when the Masons took possession of the building.

 

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Wow, Newburgh looks like such a nice building.  I assume its neighborhood is pretty well dead too.

 

Thanks for sharing a few pics of Miamisburg's!  I go through there every now and then and have always thought it was such a unique "style."

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