Jump to content
zaceman

Cleveland: Historic Photos

Recommended Posts

52 minutes ago, Cleburger said:

 

And I'm sure they weren't trying to re-route trolleys and traffic off Public Square! 🙂

And there were probably a few that were hoping for something taller😁

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

might be the first time a render actually closely resembled the final product.

 

or maybe they all did back then.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colonial Arcade (aka 5th Street Arcades) when it was a lonely mid-rise on Prospect Avenue, circa-1900s. BTW, the C&E depot at right was for an electric interurban that went out Mayfield Road and then split in Geauga County, with one route bound for Chardon and the other for Middlefield. It was planned to go all the way to Warren and Sharon, Pa.

Colonial Arcade-Prospectside-c1900s.jpg

Edited by KJP
  • Like 9

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holmden Avenue hill and mill workers housing, Tremont, 1932

 

Holmden Avenue-Tremont-1932.jpg

  • Like 5

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Euclid Ave. at E.55th st. with an officer directing traffic. Pennsylvania Railroad elevation project throughout the east side is well underway (same time that the crosstown Nickel Plate RR subgrade project occurred) in the 1910s...

FB_IMG_1581830358903.jpg

  • Like 2

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#TBT Shopping district on St. Clair & E. 105th St., 1961

Subject Cleveland Collection No. Q01006. Cleveland Public Library Photograph Collection. Source: Plain Dealer, 1961. Photographer: Matjasic, Ray.

#CLE #Cleveland #ThisWasCLE #Glenville #BlackHistoryMonth

 

IMG_20200216_070108.jpg

  • Like 2

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

  • Like 2

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack knife bridge number 5 over the Cuyahoga. Early 1970s.  Looking East from the Erie lackawanna rr. right of way which crossed over the penn central at this location. Lorain Carnegie bridge to the left. Train is taking casting sand to ford  in Brookpark. To cast engine blocks for vehicles. Scranton rd. Is underneath the engines.

image.jpeg

Edited by bigbrian24
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Erie Lackawanna railroad Fairbanks Morse trainmaster locomotives at riverbed ore recieving yard. The gray bridge in background behind second engine is Willow st lift bridge. Black bridge behind willow st. is bridge number 1, over the mouth of the Cuyahoga River. Ex New York central rr. Now Norfolk southern rr. The street the Volkswagen is on is river rd.  The w. 28th st. Projects are to the right out of view in  pic. The 3rd locomotive back is in the original Erie railroad colors. Erie rr. And Delaware,Lackawanna and western merged in 1960 to form Erie Lackawanna rr. Which was headquartered in the terminal tower till 1976. Circa mid 60s

image.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

July 1971. Erie Lackawanna commuter train #28 at lee rd. And miles ave. Passenger station.  First pic train is eastbound. Second pic is eastbound crossing lee rd. Third pic is an American locomotive company (alco) C-424 locomotive heading westbound,  towards literary st. Yard. With a caboose about to cross lee rd.  4th and 5th pic is a timetable for the commuter train from 1970.

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Edited by bigbrian24
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure would love to see someone recreate that Union Commerce Bank building on Euclid Avenue where Woolworth's was built in the 1940s (now the House of Blues).

 

 


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today, this is the Sokol Center. It's next to the site of NRP Group's new apartment complex.....

 

 

My son goes there for gymnastics/sports. This is what the inside of that older building looks like as of last week.

 

ESN1EuoWsAMJAF6?format=jpg&name=large

 

ESN1KTbXkAIFxeN?format=jpg&name=large

  • Like 4

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ czech it out -- its kept very nice inside.

 

 

vu at la cave

 

spacer.png

 

 

world series of rock era 1970s

 

spacer.png

 

 

supremes at leos casino 1966

 

spacer.png

 

 

beatles in town

 

spacer.png

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking west on Chester Avenue in 1950, two years after the new Greyhound station in the background opened

FB_IMG_1583638175825.jpg

Edited by KJP
  • Love 1

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, KJP said:

Looking east on Chester Avenue in 1950, two years after the new Greyhound station in the background opened

FB_IMG_1583638175825.jpg

I think this is looking west 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the building dead center of the frame is still there.  This is looking NW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, X said:

Yes, the building dead center of the frame is still there.  This is looking NW.

 

Whatever direction it is, I want to cry every time I see the density that was Cleveland in the 30's-50's.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, ryanfrazier said:

I think this is looking west 

 

I do that all the time. 


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Cleburger said:

 

Whatever direction it is, I want to cry every time I see the density that was Cleveland in the 30's-50's.

 

Cleveland's population density was actually higher in the 1800s. The poor neighborhoods next to the Flats (Haymarket, Old Angle, Newburg) had densities in excess of 20,000 people per square mile and probably exceeded 30,000 in places.

 

  • Like 1

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are probably more people living in the area depicted by this photo now than there were when it was taken.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Cleburger said:

 

Whatever direction it is, I want to cry every time I see the density that was Cleveland in the 30's-50's.

Look even in this photo how much space has been given over to cars. I think the 1900s-10s would have been peak. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i remember we specifically went to see this back in the day -- this one or maybe another i dk -- wish i still had the pics.

 

eliot ness

1947 campaign for mayor

36st & cedar

1973

 

 

spacer.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow

 

  • Like 1

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Downtown Cleveland aerial, 1936

Cleveland downtown aerial-1936-Getty.jpg

  • Like 6

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

  • Like 2

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, w28th said:

Wow. That's incredible.

 

Sure is. Short shorts on a guy are one of the few reasons why the 80s had to end.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Boomerang_Brian said:

Found on Reddit.  West 25th looking south, 1980. Reddit user battered_feet


x3qrdl2do1o41.jpg

 

 

 

 

This. is. staggering. 

 

And look at how wide that sidewalk is! 

Edited by YABO713
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, KJP said:

 

Sure is. Short shorts on a guy are one of the few reasons why the 80s had to end.

Is that you in the front there KJP, manning the fire hyrdrant?  😜

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/23/2020 at 1:21 PM, YABO713 said:

^Horizontal Books stood the test of time!

 

 

I was just thinking the same thing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not too sure where to put this, but here looks a as good as anywhere. 
 

Nice, brief history of Sanborn Maps, along with a copy of the key used, which I’d not seen before. 
 

https://www.citylab.com/equity/2014/10/the-accidental-revelations-of-sanborn-maps/381262/?utm_content=citylab&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic

 


And they reckon that the last thing she saw in her life was
Sting, singing on the roof of the Barbican

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loew’s State Theatre in January, 1969. It closed the following month, and was slated for demolition at least twice during the 1970’s before the newly formed Playhouse Square Foundation secured long-term leases for all three of the connected theatres (State, Palace and Ohio). Restoration of the theater began in 1979, and was completed in the summer of 1984, after the addition of a $7 million stagehouse. The State Theatre was renamed KeyBank State Theatre in 2017.

FB_IMG_1585311378930.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Love 1

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/22/2020 at 6:50 PM, KJP said:

 

 

I always enjoy these but this one is technically incorrect (doesn't change how cool it is, though). The original construction consisted of only 14 window bays spanning the Superior side. In 1910, four additional bays were added - see the thicker vertical strip on the left side - that's where they were added.

image.png

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting little tidbit on the building. Never noticed that before. On these oh so slow development days we'll have to be good with the little things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Best to see the whole picture without clicking on it.....

 

EUOR7tgWoAAs00V?format=jpg&name=large

Edited by KJP
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gorgeous 

 

  • Like 1
  • Love 1

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, mrnyc said:

what's the opposite of social distancing?

 

epic 1935

 

 

spacer.png

Man was everything dirty!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cleburger said:

Man was everything dirty!  

 

Almost everything was powered by coal and this was already six years into the Great Depression. So nobody was doing any cleaning. They weren't doing much cleaning until after the war. Imagine coming back to these dirty, polluted industrial cities after the war. No wonder everyone wanted to address the housing shortage by building new, cleaner highway-fed suburbs where there was room to keep and drive a car. Then you had the southern blacks coming north for industrial jobs and the blockbusting that followed. It was a perfect storm for complacent cities like Cleveland to become partially abandoned and heavily impoverished.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

home of the rock? so let's rock:

 

 

 

the white stripes

pats in the flats

1998

 

 

spacer.png

 

 

 

the black keys

beachland

2002

 

 

spacer.png

 

 

 

stevie ray vaughn

blossom

1990 

 

 

spacer.png

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, KJP said:

 

Almost everything was powered by coal and this was already six years into the Great Depression. So nobody was doing any cleaning. They weren't doing much cleaning until after the war. Imagine coming back to these dirty, polluted industrial cities after the war. No wonder everyone wanted to address the housing shortage by building new, cleaner highway-fed suburbs where there was room to keep and drive a car. Then you had the southern blacks coming north for industrial jobs and the blockbusting that followed. It was a perfect storm for complacent cities like Cleveland to become partially abandoned and heavily impoverished.

 

To your point @KJP a couple years ago, over some drinks with my dad... I asked why Grandpa had decided to leave the city  when everything was so convenient (He grew up on w. 61 between Herman and Detroit and my Grandma grew up across the street from him). And he said...

 

"Well, during the Great Depression, Grandpa took a rail car at the age of 11 as far as it would go, then would hitchhike the rest of his way to caddy at Lakewood Country Club. He did it five days a week. After he came back from WWII, he got a job as a fireman, going into industrial fires non-stop for $1,200 a year. I don't think 'walkable neighborhoods' was much of a consideration for Grandpa when he moved us to Parma."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, mrnyc said:

what's the opposite of social distancing?

 

epic 1935

 

 

spacer.png

 

BTW, this scene was in stark contrast to the following two years with the Great Lakes Exposition of 1936-37. Such a shame we didn't keep that as a permanent showplace-marketplace with the promenade across the tracks. But the Shoreway getting built through here pretty much killed any momentum for doing something nice with the lakefront.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...