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This one is going to yield some tears.....

 

 

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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4 minutes ago, YABO713 said:

Honestly love your Painesville/Lake County history takes, @eastvillagedon always some cool stuff. 

 

it's therapy😅

 

and if anyone cares, the picture of the building on the lower left (in the larger picture just above it to the right) is Lake Erie College's College Hall, built in 1859. And if you go about an inch above that, I believe that's the Steele Mansion.

Edited by eastvillagedon

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11 hours ago, YABO713 said:

A football game between Western Reserve and Baldwin Wallace at League Park, 1935

9EEB373D-B587-487E-9CD6-1F1CD4039C8F.jpeg

 

Found a description of this exact game! 

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=LhrYoCJfeNsC&pg=PA145&lpg=PA145&dq="big+four+heyday"&source=bl&ots=v_CiAgZECo&sig=ACfU3U2i-NlQHXX_B1S5SuiBBztOi7gb4A&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwje9cCjw5DgAhUC9IMKHQTTC2UQ6AEwB3oECAgQAQ#v=onepage&q="big four heyday"&f=false

 

...referred to as the 'Aerial Circus'...the Yellow Jackets wound up as college football's highest-scoring team that year, with an average of 43.8 points per game.  Western Reserve had what may have been the best football team in school history.

 

Here's a super interesting stat from this era -- the NCAA college football scoring national leaders in a single season were unofficially:

 

1935 - Ray Zeh, RB, Western Reserve (112 pts)

1936 - Norm Schoen, RB, Baldwin-Wallace (117 pts)

 

Scroll to the very bottom of this link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_NCAA_major_college_football_yearly_scoring_leaders 

 

Both players, of course, played in this game in the above photo.  The "Big Four" college football battles were the games to go to in Cleveland before the Rams and the Browns.

Edited by MuRrAy HiLL
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I'd come upon some photos of old Cleveland neighborhood movie theaters and thought I would re-imagine them somewhat in their current surroundings. The Abby Theater was in Collinwood and The Norwood  was on St. Clair near E. 65th St.

Abby.jpg

 

Norwood.jpg

Edited by Barneyboy
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5 hours ago, Barneyboy said:

I'd come upon some photos of old Cleveland neighborhood movie theaters and thought I would re-imagine them somewhat in their current surroundings. The Abby Theater was in Collinwood and The Norwood  was on St. Clair near E. 65th St.

Abby.jpg

 

Norwood.jpg

 

More specifically the Abby was at E. 156th and Waterloo at the edge of the current arts district (such that it is).   That's a vacant lot now and they are going back and forth about the gold building to the right.  The marquee suggests 1939 as the date.   It was closed by 1950.

 

Edited by E Rocc

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EDIT: I've enlarged them....

 

DySf9ixXcAEU0yH.jpg

 

DySf_NZW0AAUuNm.jpg

Edited by KJP

"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Was able to get my hands on a 1940 college football program of Western Reserve Red Cats vs Miami (of Ohio) Redskins.  There are several future NFL players in these college ranks, including Bill Belichick's father Steve.  In fact, the present day Case Western Reserve football team uses the Steve Belichick Varsity Weight Room

 

Also worth noting, Bill Belichick was named after his godfather, and Western Reserve college football hall of fame coach from this era, Bill Edwards.

 

This was when college football was big in Cleveland --  the Big Four Conference was Case Tech, Western Reserve, Baldwin-Wallace, and John Carroll.

 

Western Reserve would later defeat Arizona State in a New Year's Day bowl game to end the season: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1941_Sun_Bowl

 

Date: Oct 26, 1940

Location: League Park, Cleveland, OH

Score: Western Reserve wins 47-6

 

Here are a few pages:

 

IMG_3364.thumb.jpg.161c4eb2af8392597ee26f7c2ee85861.jpgIMG_3369.thumb.jpg.a28b47a36f926f5533f2789e29be493e.jpg

IMG_3368.thumb.jpg.13d1d019dbfac5b38ae563037f4158c6.jpgIMG_3365.thumb.jpg.e091233d66be89c5f7cb2bbf096ebcb2.jpg

image1.thumb.jpeg.b390e959f632d48b5dd96c1f4f3f0571.jpegIMG_3391.thumb.jpg.493a01b8eed996bef544cee001542b49.jpg

IMG_3379.thumb.jpg.1405e1b36d117aa1f2a8c360e15484b0.jpg

image4.thumb.jpeg.f8ecb63e41e77f15f15d65f2e38fe96a.jpeg

IMG_3396.thumb.jpg.0738dbb991ec104b66fd2ad7f7afe1d6.jpg

image3.thumb.jpeg.14a94f6561f3a115a94a1ab9022e3efc.jpeg

IMG_3392.thumb.jpg.42bff74be32be1a578f307c47be16260.jpg

IMG_3398.thumb.jpg.caf87b124a5e44fa3c44042ef3aefb46.jpg

Edited by MuRrAy HiLL
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OUTSTANDING!!!!

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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If anyone has unlimited hours, here an immense amount of interesting Cleveland history and images in this Case and Western Reserve newspaper collection:

 

 https://newspapers.case.edu/?a=cl&cl=CL2&e=-------en-20--1--txt-txIN-------

 

Feel like I just unearthed a time capsule, and kinda related to the football program (I've already found the newspaper article on that specific game).  

Advertisements throughout are absolutely fascinating.  

 

EDIT: For example, found out something new - there was talk of building a 25,000 seat stadium in University Circle in 1935: https://newspapers.case.edu/?a=d&d=TRW19351105-01&e=-------en-20--1--txt-txIN-------

 

Edited by MuRrAy HiLL
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15 hours ago, Terdolph said:

Interesting that WRU had 12,000 students at that time. 

 

This is probably the current total enrollment of the federated CWRU. 

 

So, total enrollment of both schools since then has dropped?

 

I don't think enrollment is necessarily less, since that 12,000 numbers includes the old Cleveland College, which was located downtown (in the Baker Memorial Building on Public Square):

 

Photos: https://case.edu/its/archives/downtown/clevelandcollege.htm

 

History: https://case.edu/artsci/isus/clevecollege.htm

Edited by MuRrAy HiLL

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With KJP's picture as an inspiration, I just realized that the 1970's/80's "Central Market" was actually the decapitated, rump remains of the Sheriff Street Market.

 

sheriff-street-market-cleveland-1905-historic-vantage-canvas-print (002).jpg

large (002).jpg

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Glad you noticed, @ydard! My father told me in the 70s about it. I was the same age in the 1970s as he was in the 1930s when the Sheriff's Street Market partially burned down. As much as we love and brag about the West Side Market, the Sheriff's Street Market was even more impressive.

 

BTW, you notice that it says "New Market" on the corner of the historic shot? It's because it was touted as the newer, more elaborate private-sector counterpart to the Central Market. The Sheriff's Street Market was built in 1891. The original Central Market was a public market built in 1856, but there was another market built in the middle of Ontario/Sheriff/Eagle/Orange/Bolivar that preceded it, going back to the 1840s.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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On 2/5/2019 at 8:17 AM, MuRrAy HiLL said:

Was able to get my hands on a 1940 college football program of Western Reserve Red Cats vs Miami (of Ohio) Redskins.  There are several future NFL players in these college ranks, including Bill Belichick's father Steve.  In fact, the present day Case Western Reserve football team uses the Steve Belichick Varsity Weight Room

 

Also worth noting, Bill Belichick was named after his godfather, and Western Reserve college football hall of fame coach from this era, Bill Edwards.

 

This was when college football was big in Cleveland --  the Big Four Conference was Case Tech, Western Reserve, Baldwin-Wallace, and John Carroll.

 

Western Reserve would later defeat Arizona State in a New Year's Day bowl game to end the season: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1941_Sun_Bowl

 

Date: Oct 26, 1940

Location: League Park, Cleveland, OH

Score: Western Reserve wins 47-6

 

Here are a few pages:

 

IMG_3364.thumb.jpg.161c4eb2af8392597ee26f7c2ee85861.jpgIMG_3369.thumb.jpg.a28b47a36f926f5533f2789e29be493e.jpg

IMG_3368.thumb.jpg.13d1d019dbfac5b38ae563037f4158c6.jpgIMG_3365.thumb.jpg.e091233d66be89c5f7cb2bbf096ebcb2.jpg

image1.thumb.jpeg.b390e959f632d48b5dd96c1f4f3f0571.jpegIMG_3391.thumb.jpg.493a01b8eed996bef544cee001542b49.jpg

IMG_3379.thumb.jpg.1405e1b36d117aa1f2a8c360e15484b0.jpg

image4.thumb.jpeg.f8ecb63e41e77f15f15d65f2e38fe96a.jpeg

IMG_3396.thumb.jpg.0738dbb991ec104b66fd2ad7f7afe1d6.jpg

image3.thumb.jpeg.14a94f6561f3a115a94a1ab9022e3efc.jpeg

IMG_3392.thumb.jpg.42bff74be32be1a578f307c47be16260.jpg

IMG_3398.thumb.jpg.caf87b124a5e44fa3c44042ef3aefb46.jpg

 

Something I found:  Drop Dies and Forgings (now Wyman Gordon/PCC) and Champion Machine (now Presrite) not only are still in business, albeit under different names, I interviewed at both.

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On 2/15/2019 at 1:54 PM, ydard said:

With KJP's picture as an inspiration, I just realized that the 1970's/80's "Central Market" was actually the decapitated, rump remains of the Sheriff Street Market.

 

sheriff-street-market-cleveland-1905-historic-vantage-canvas-print (002).jpg

large (002).jpg

 

Wow!! I never knew this is what the original Central Market looked like.  I remember coming to this market with my grandma in the 80's before it was demolished.  That was no gem...but this...what a gorgeous market!

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before the world series of rock there was --- opera

july 1931

 

S26.jpg

 

 

 

public bath house era

 

PBH.jpg

 

 

 

srose.jpeg

 

 

 

euclid avenue 

wilber henry adams

1930

 

00891r.jpg?w=318&h=493

 

 

 

 

e105th and euclid

 

994.jpg

 

 

 

mather mansion / euclid millionaires row

 

mathermansion5_2a4f81cfe5.jpg

 

 

p343.jpg

 

 

3c13125r.jpg?w=640&h=372&crop=1

 

 

c-15.png

 

 

 

 

4815362012_207e5a8a74.jpgspacer.png

 

 

 

w25st

1913 blizzard

 

A16.jpg

 

 

 

kaynee buildings

 

6a259be565b9f43a72b8ea0c8cbf213e.jpg

 

 

 

 

boys life

jan 1914

 

vintage-boys-life-jan-1914-boy-scouts_1_

 

 

 

Edited by mrnyc

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9 minutes ago, mrnyc said:

 

 

 

00891r.jpg?w=318&h=493

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What an innovative design this would have been. If it would have been implemented and then survived the urban planning dark ages of 1950-1990, I think this would still be regarded highly around the world. 

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it certainly is an interesting idea. two levels of retail/office/apt entrances, can you imagine? it would cover the street sidewalks below, which would be good in bad weather, yet be open up to the sun on the upper level.

 

the multiple level roadways and road tunnel are a bit much though.

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38 minutes ago, YABO713 said:

 

What an innovative design this would have been. If it would have been implemented and then survived the urban planning dark ages of 1950-1990, I think this would still be regarded highly around the world. 

 

Seriously?? Ewww....

 

I much prefer this scene at Carnegie/Cedar/East 14th before Carnegie was built between East 14-30th.

 

4815362012_207e5a8a74.jpg

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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6 minutes ago, KJP said:

 

Seriously?? Ewww....

 

I much prefer this scene at Carnegie/Cedar/East 14th before Carnegie was built between East 14-30th.

 

4815362012_207e5a8a74.jpg

 

Aesthetically, I'm with you...

 

But I think the design I referenced would have been a fun traffic/economic case study in how diverting traffic away from pedestrian areas may or may promote commercial, residential, or retail growth. 

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7 minutes ago, YABO713 said:

^ @KJP @jam40jeff, no, it's 14th and Carnegie, but I think that's Central that is diagonal - not cedar

 

Sorry, I didn't word it very well, but that's what I meant (that the diagonal was Central and not Cedar.)

 

The view is down Central, with E. 14th crossing and Carnegie heading off diagonally slightly to the left in the background.

 

Part of Central north of the Innerbelt still exists, or at least did before the new Innerbelt bridge was completed.  (I'm not sure if it survived that project or not.)

 

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.4974349,-81.6779551,3a,75y,273.79h,83.06t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1ssH5OKv-Mj3xPl2h3zUy93w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

 

Edited by jam40jeff
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Not the best photo quality but it shows you just how incredibly dense the industry was and how much it pushed up against what was then the 4-track main line of the Pennsylvania railroad linking Cleveland with Alliance/Youngstown and on to Pittsburgh or Southeast Ohio and the East Coast. 

 

Description: Cleveland, Ohio. On the left, a Pennsylvania Railroad iron ore train about to leave for the steel mills; right, a Pennsylvania Railroad train is coming in from the coal mines - May 1943 - Jack Delano photo (BTW that's a crewman riding atop the last car as there is no caboose due to a wartime shortage).

 

Photo location (view is looking Northeast):

 

FB_IMG_1550671064361.jpg

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Cleveland's last streetcar line......

 

 

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Back during the Cold War, the Air Force commissioned massive forging presses for the manufacture of complex aerospace parts. Cleveland received the Alcoa 50,000 ton (yes, 50,000 ton) press in 1955, and it has been in operation more-or-less continuously since then. It's still the largest forging press in North America, over 60 years later. 

 

image.thumb.png.fefd5a77c05287ab1a24dc6e33a06274.png

Edited by BigDipper 80
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“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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I miss this version of East 4th. I used to make my way down 4th from Dyke College at Prospect and East 2nd, to Wendy's, located where Corner Alley is now. It was scary and exciting for a 23- to 24-year-old kid from Geauga County. Going to school in downtown Cleveland eventually pried me out of Geauga County to live progressively closer to the urban core.

 

 

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"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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4 hours ago, BigDipper 80 said:

Back during the Cold War, the Air Force commissioned massive forging presses for the manufacture of complex aerospace parts. Cleveland received the Alcoa 50,000 ton (yes, 50,000 ton) press in 1955, and it has been in operation more-or-less continuously since then. It's still the largest forging press in North America, over 60 years later. 

 

image.thumb.png.fefd5a77c05287ab1a24dc6e33a06274.png

 

I think that is used for truck wheels now.

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On 2/18/2019 at 4:19 PM, YABO713 said:

 

What an innovative design this would have been. If it would have been implemented and then survived the urban planning dark ages of 1950-1990, I think this would still be regarded highly around the world. 

 

What was the tall building shown in front of Terminal?   An actual proposal?  It doesn't quite look like AT&T.

Edited by E Rocc

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On 2/18/2019 at 4:08 PM, mrnyc said:

 

 

 

before the world series of rock there was --- opera

july 1931

 

S26.jpg

 

 

 

public bath house era

 

PBH.jpg

 

 

 

srose.jpeg

 

 

 

euclid avenue 

wilber henry adams

1930

 

00891r.jpg?w=318&h=493

 

 

 

 

e105th and euclid

 

994.jpg

 

 

 

mather mansion / euclid millionaires row

 

mathermansion5_2a4f81cfe5.jpg

 

 

p343.jpg

 

 

3c13125r.jpg?w=640&h=372&crop=1

 

 

c-15.png

 

 

 

 

4815362012_207e5a8a74.jpgspacer.png

 

 

 

w25st

1913 blizzard

 

A16.jpg

 

 

 

kaynee buildings

 

6a259be565b9f43a72b8ea0c8cbf213e.jpg

 

 

 

 

boys life

jan 1914

 

vintage-boys-life-jan-1914-boy-scouts_1_

 

 

 

 

The 1934 Kaynee "strike" is a counterpoint story that illustrates that the labor struggles of that era were not always noble and altruistic labor organizers against greedy companies.

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They still got it in Japan.  Just sayin'...

 

p16-konbini-blues-z-20171231-870x580.jpg

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"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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I think you can still get the Lawson's chip dip at some Circle K's. 

 

"Roll on Big-O, get that juice up to Lawson's in 40 hours!"

They play that old commercial when you listen to Cleveland sports talk 92.3 online. 

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16 hours ago, surfohio said:

I think you can still get the Lawson's chip dip at some Circle K's. 

 

"Roll on Big-O, get that juice up to Lawson's in 40 hours!"

They play that old commercial when you listen to Cleveland sports talk 92.3 online. 

 

That's correct, and also at some of the independent stores that used to be Lawson's or Convenient.

 

Oddly enough, Lawson's in Japan doesn't have it.

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I loved Lawson's. I remember when one opened in my rundown hood in the early 60's (it's now a seedy looking bar). We were there all the time, buying mounds of chip-chopped ham (was that a Cleveland area specialty??). Not long afterward a Convenient Food Mart opened across the street, which of course offered a greater variety of packaged junk (but i don't remember if they had a deli area)

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1 minute ago, eastvillagedon said:

I loved Lawson's. I remember when one opened in my rundown hood in the early 60's (it's now a seedy looking bar). We were there all the time, buying mounds of chip-chopped ham (was that a Cleveland area specialty??). Not long afterward a Convenient Food Mart opened across the street, which of course offered a greater variety of packaged junk (but i don't remember if they had a deli area)

 

If you make jambalaya or other cajun stews, chip chopped ham is absolutely the best kind to use at it absorbs the flavors.

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