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Northern Kentucky: Random Development and News

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Is the Florence city council on drugs or what? I lived in that area for almost 2 years and this is going to be something that I don't think Florence can handle. Mall Rd is like two miles long in that stretch they are talking about. It's going to be immensly expensive and take a long time to complete. I thought Florence learned their lesson with the Freedom Baseball Stadium?

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grasscat--where is rising sun, oh? lol! here it is--don't blink or you'll miss it:

 

http://maps.yahoo.com/py/maps.py?Pyt=Tmap&&csz=Rising+Sun+OH+&Get%A0Map=Get+Map

 

***basically its in northwest ohio. rising sun actually has some fame as the birthplace of silent film legends dorothy and lillian gish. why do i know that factoid? because of the gish theater at bgsu. *not to be confused with rising sun in ohio county in kentucky which happened when i googled.

 

 

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Here is a great, loooong article from the 1/14/05 Cincinnati Business Courier:

 

 

Finessing Florence

New vision would punch up aging Mall Road corridor to create 'new urbanism' ethos.

Lucy May and Lisa Biank Fasig

Courier Staff Reporters

 

There was a time when this corridor of aging shopping centers, telephone poles and long lines of traffic reigned as the retail gem of Northern Kentucky.

 

Mall Road, with Florence Mall as its anchor, for decades served as the epicenter of retail activity in the burgeoning Florence community. With its lineup of department stores, discounters and restaurants, easy access to all the major interstates and little competition, it was assured success.

 

But Mall Road, though no less important now than it was 30 years ago, has failed to grow with the region it serves. Northern Kentucky now counts 340,000 households. What it requires, in the mind of Cincinnati retail consultant Stan Eichelbaum, is a transformation that would make it the "southside downtown."

 

http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2005/01/17/story1.html

 

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Here's an update on Harbor Greene from the 2/23/05 Kentucky Post:

 

Harbor Greene is under way

Bellevue home to $90M project

Post staff report

 

Construction began this week on the $90 million Harbor Greene residential and commercial development along Fairfield Avenue in Bellevue.  It is one of four new upscale developments that will give the city of 6,138 an array of mixed-income residents.

 

The new condominiums, town homes and single-family houses will range in price from $300,000 to $1.4 million.  Most houses in Bellevue are valued between $50,000 and $100,000.

 

Harbor Greene, being constructed on 14 acres by the Ackermann Group of Mount Carmel, Ohio, will consist of 105 condominiums, 90,000 square feet of office space and 100,000 square feet of retail space, including a Gold's gym and a restaurant.

 

http://www.kypost.com/2005/02/23/harb022305.html

 

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^ I've always advocated more market-rate, affordable housing near the core.  I'm afraid with all of these upscale condo projects, we're going to have a glut.

 

That's not to say that I don't get excited by all of these condo projects.  A lot of developers seem to see the benefits outweighing the risk, which I guess is a good thing.  I mean, we could be having no action at all.

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Also under construction is the first of three buildings of three town homes each at Lake Street and Ross Avenue.

 

The nine homes being built by Bora Development of Cincinnati will range in price from $350,000 to $500,000.

 

Here's a slightly small rendering of these townhomes, the Bellevue Townhomes or whatever.  They are going for $300K+.

 

http://www.starone.com/displaylist.asw?listnum=307997&mls=nky

 

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Little is happening with this, but since it's planned for the future I'll start a thread that we can add to later as the project moves along.

 

From the city of Covington website:

 

The Riverfront West site is bordered by the Ohio River, the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge, Fourth St. and Johnson Street. Historically, site use has included scrap iron, generator and auto parts manufacturers. The area is scheduled to be redeveloped as a multi-building complex including office, commercial, retail, and residential development. The city is currently working with the state of Kentucky and the United States Army Corp of Engineers to acquire initial project funding.

 

http://www.covingtonky.com/index.asp?page=brownfields

 

 

Expansion of Covington’s Riverfront West is slated as a three-pronged project bringing an estimated $813 million to Kentucky as well as nearly 10,000 jobs. Anchored between Covington Landing, a floating entertainment complex, and the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge, the mixed-use 15 acre site is being positioned as serving the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week with residential, commercial, and parking developments.

 

Covington’s Riverfront West will be a place to live, work, and play and will fulfill a demand for moderate to upper income housing, commercial high rise office and hotel developments, as well as restaurant, entertainment, and shopping facilities.  Strategically positioned near I-75, the Riverfront West area will have an approximate minimum square footage design of 400,000 SF of residential; 500,000 SF of Office; 100,000 SF of Hotel; 30,000 SF for restaurant/entertainment related development; and a 1800 car garage.

 

Of the 15 acres, state assistance is needed to acquire 5 acres, infrastructure improvements, and a new expanded flood wall/opening. Covington will provide the funds for the 1800 multi-modal parking complex and riverfront park improvements. Commercial developers will invest funds on the overall market driven development involving residential and commercial uses. The state is estimated to increase its income and sales tax by $12.9 million according to a University of Cincinnati Economic Research Group. Approximately 32 percent of the fiscal impact will be a one-time gain from construction and $8.7 million will recur each year of operation for businesses within the development.

 

http://www.covingtonky.com/index.asp?page=eco_future_development_projects

 

 

 

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Interesting, is that the site directly across from Cincinnati's own huge scrap iron facility.  In about 10 years both sides of the riverfront will be nice

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I think I mentioned this about a year ago, this is a neat project, but think it is more long term than the city of Covington leads everyone to believe.  I don't know if the City controls much or any of the land, and the link says that "State assistance will be needed to acquire 5 of the 15 acres".  Isn't the State of KY in quite a budget crunch these days?  They are also talking about new floodwalls and openings, which I am sure won't come cheap.

 

I am not trying to be pessimistic, just realistic.  In some ways, the Banks is ahead of this by miles in land acquisition, funding and infrastructure.

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Kentucky is in somewhat of a budget crunch (as is every state), but they seem much more willing to part with money for funding projects.

 

You're right, though--this is a long-term project and I don't expect much action anytime soon.

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From the 3/7/05 Enquirer:

 

 

bilde?Site=AB&Date=20050307&Category=NEWS0103&ArtNo=503070331&Ref=AR&Profile=1059&MaxW=600&title=1

Kevin Holt and his family are the only residents on a short block of Locust Street in Covington. He hopes his new neighbors are better behaved than the former ones. The city is promoting it as part of an art district.  The Enquirer/Patrick Reddy

 

Wanted: Artists to revitalize old block

By Mike Rutledge

Enquirer staff writer

 

COVINGTON - After observing Locust Street's plagues - drugs, prostitution, killings, robberies, terroristic racial threats - Teresa and Kevin Holt appreciate the silence around them.

 

Still, they wouldn't mind having someone else live on the 1100 block, where all the other buildings are boarded up or empty.

 

...

 

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050307/NEWS0103/503070331/1059/news01


bilde?Site=AB&Date=20050307&Category=NEWS0103&ArtNo=503070332&Ref=AR&Profile=1059&MaxW=600&title=1

Former tenants’ names are written on a boarded-up building on Locust Street in Covington, a street once riddled with crime but now part of a proposed arts district.  The Enquirer/Patrick Reddy

 

Pike Street part of arts vision

By Mike Rutledge

Enquirer staff writer

 

COVINGTON - Pike Street, which intersects with the popular Main Street of MainStrasse fame, can become a trendy place with funky galleries and Internet cafes, city officials believe.

 

And Collin Rowland, 37, who plans to launch a company called Living Studios in his building at 264 Pike St. this summer, loves their concept of the Covington Arts District.

 

...

 

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050307/NEWS0103/503070332/1059/news01

 

 

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IMO, it's a farce that the city should even have to step in and offer incentives to revitalize this area.  The Pike/Madison district is one of the coolest in the area, and the lack of private interest in it speaks volumes about the anti-urban mentality of the population.

 

still, i support the city's actions and wish them well.

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This is somewhat related, as it lies on the eastern edge of the redevelopment area.  From the 3/8/05 Enquirer:

 

 

Ice House project moving along

Developer gets Covington warehouse

By Mike Rutledge

Enquirer staff writer

 

COVINGTON - Progress is about to unfreeze on Covington's Ice House building, starting Wednesday with the purchase of a neighboring property.

 

Pleasant Ridge developer Allen Haehnle will buy the 7,000-square-foot Covington Paper & Woodenware building at 428-430 Scott Blvd. for $180,000. He needed that building, which he will raze, to provide on-site parking for 20-25 vehicles, and also to build a stairway and elevators for the 141-year-old Ice House, at 424 Scott, which will become office space.

 

...

 

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050308/NEWS0103/503080353/1059/news01

 

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ok, now that i read that, i remember the original article in the paper which included a picture.  excellent renovation, i know that building.

 

what i meant to ask for actually was a picture of the Covington Paper building.  anytime i hear "raze," my curiosity demands some photographic evidence to see what we may be losing in the name of parking.  i'll keep an eye out.

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The 24 unit homes on the waterfront will be doubtful at best to ever happen.

 

You need to have BUYERS and you need to have CAPITAL to build such a development....and pretty good information tells me neither is or has been in the works. Notice there is no "Coming Soon" sign or "Being Built by" signs on where this is going....anyone ever think of asking WHY?

 

And who the heck is Bora Development anyway? I have asked this question to MANY people and nobody knows nor has anyone heard of them nor can you find them listed anywhere. That would make me weary as heck dropping a deposit on a unit to a company I can't find out squat about.

 

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The saga continues...from the 3/15/05 NKY Challenger:

 

 

doc42320feb42057615237178.jpg

WEEKDAY TRAFFIC: Madison Avenue in Covington remains busy during weekdays with vehicular business traffic and commuters.  Mike Boland / For The Sunday Challenger

 

Greening of Covington

Arts District, Farmer's Market to Build City Identity

By Jason Feldmann

The Sunday Challenger

jfeldmann@challengernky.com

 

COVINGTON - Kathie Hickey, Covington's Renaissance/Main Street manager, sees a future for Covington's Madison Avenue quite different from the current street.

 

"My vision for the city is to see all the buildings restored to some level and brought up to date. I see all of them full. I see people living down here, which will keep it alive 'After 5,' so to speak. I see more social activity. I see more green space. I see a lot of partnerships with our cultural institutions, with our government, with our non-profits, with the private sector. I just have a really good feeling about all of this."

 

...

 

http://www.challengernky.com/articles/2005/03/15/around_nky/doc42320feb42057615237178.txt

 

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    That question has been brought up for lots of different ideas: the U.S.S. Cincinnati, Riverboat Casinos, and so on. There is a technical reason why it is not likely to happen:

 

    The Ohio Side of the river at Downtown Cincinnati has limited development potential due to navigation concerns.

 

    Look at the L&N or the Big Mac bridge. The main span is near the Ohio shore. Several smaller spans are near the Kentucky shore. The big tows stay near the Ohio shore because the water is deeper and because of the bridges.

 

    You might remember the Star of Cincinnati riverboat that used to dock on the Ohio side. The Army Corp of Engineers got so many complaints from river pilots about that they are not likely to approve any new development of that scale on the Ohio side.

 

    On the other hand, there are other places on the Ohio side besides downtown that it would work.

 

   

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Garden to give Devou Park overlook a new look

By Feoshia Henderson Post staff reporter

 

The overlook at Devou Park will get a makeover this summer after the Homebuilder's Association of Northern Kentucky breaks ground on a garden project there.  The "Devou Park Overlook Memorial Gardens" will mark the association's 50th anniversary in the city that gave it its start, said Executive Vice President Dan Dressman.

 

"We thought about doing a project here at our building site, but decided we'd rather do something in our community that was more visible," Dressman said. "What better place than Devou Park? Everyone in the region uses it. It's a real focal point in the community."

 

Read full article here:

http://news.cincypost.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050428/NEWS02/504280368/1011/

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Groovy.

 

What I want them (not the Homebuilder's Association, obviously... just a generic "them") to do is to not close the park at dusk, so that we may stick around longer for taking night photos!

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Why is the Devou Park view looking from the Newport side? ;)


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Why is the Devou Park view looking from the Newport side? ;)

 

HA

 

Groovy.

 

What I want them (not the Homebuilder's Association, obviously... just a generic "them") to do is to not close the park at dusk, so that we may stick around longer for taking night photos!

 

I am sick and tired of getting escorted out of Devou Park because I just want to take photos.

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A name change...from the 5/2/05 Enquirer:

 

Condo gets new name, developer

But WatersEdge on 'fast track'

By Mike Rutledge

Enquirer staff writer

 

BELLEVUE - The developer has changed, and the 24-unit Bellevue Waterfront Condominiums now will be called WatersEdge at Bellevue.

 

Designs for the spacious riverfront units remain the same.  Each will have 3,200 square feet, ceilings nine to 10 feet high, and a great room with a 26-foot length of windows eight feet tall, facing a panoramic river and city view.  Each will have 650 square feet of covered terrace outside.  Joshua One, a partnership of Paul Zeltwanger of Cincinnati and John Hans of Indianapolis, recently bought the development from Cincinnati-based Donenfeld Group.

 

Units in the seven-story structures (including the parking level) will sell for $705,000 to $845,000, depending on what level the identical units are on.  They will have three bedrooms or two bedrooms and a study.  A crew last week was preparing to raze buildings near Taylor and Eden avenues.  Developers this week planned to demolish buildings and conduct test borings to determine what foundation or piering system they will use.

 

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050502/NEWS0103/505020369/-1/rss

 

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It seems really dumb to close the park at dark, especially with Drees Pavillion or whatever it is called there.  I'm sure they have plenty of events that go until way after dusk.

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