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The Goose Island stuff looks good but what is it with these weird ass curvy pedestrian bridges lately?  Thanks OMAHA for the American trend!


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Another flagship for the Mag Mile.

http://www.chicagomag.com/style-shopping/February-2015/Under-Armour-is-Opening-Their-Biggest-Brand-House-Ever-on-Michigan-Avenue/

 

Since Eddie Bauer moved to their new store, under armor will take over this space.  I also noticed Harley Davidson will moving into the 2nd floor of the Ritz Carlton with Shake shack is now open in the previous Harley space on Ohio.

 

Also heard that All Saints will move to a new boutique location which means  the Mich ave space will be freed up.  I have a gut feeling Apple may be interested but who knows.  But that would mean the existing apple space would become available.

 

Also lots of work going on at the Uniqlo store on the 5th and 6th floors of the Bonwit Teller building, which also features a new Verizon flagship And what appears to be an in-process facade renovation of H&M. 

 

Still waiting on tenants to be announced for two hundred north and the Northbridge Mall expansion. (New department store?). A couple new tenants opened at millenniun plaza and the new Blackhawks store on the 2nd level of 333 North.

 

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This is one of the most dramatic developments going on in Chicago right now:

 

http://chicago.curbed.com/archives/2015/03/06/a-field-trip-through-lincoln-parks-new-city-development.php

 

Its filling in a hole left from when Cabrini Green was demolished.  I'm looking forward to seeing the final results - architecture isn't special but I'm interested in seeing how it will make that corner a bit more vibrant.

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Hm, that looks like a pretty bland development. Essentially a mall with a couple of non-descript towers and parking garages. Maybe this isn't a fair comparison, but I thought of New York's Atlantic Yards as being a similar large scale, multi-tower infill project, and the difference between the two is staggering.

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Hm, that looks like a pretty bland development. Essentially a mall with a couple of non-descript towers and parking garages. Maybe this isn't a fair comparison, but I thought of New York's Atlantic Yards as being a similar large scale, multi-tower infill project, and the difference between the two is staggering.

 

Wasn't saying it was anything great, but its very large scale on an area that was a very large empty field and more than a bit of a dead zone that's lied fallow for many years - what was there before was massive public housing blocks and other mid century junk so I do see this as an improvement.  I wish it was better looking, but the alderman there is particularly corruptible and I'm sure the developers lined his campaign wallet.

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It's hideous.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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I can't imagine hanging out there much, but it sure is a marked improvement from the bleakness that existed prior.

 

But god almighty is the redline stop an abomination there.

 

 

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Agreed.

On a side note, the Arhaus Furniture (CLE based company) store a few blocks away on Clybourn is one of the nicest retail spaces I've ever seen.

 

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Oy, I can only imagine what it was like before. It feels so narrow, cramped, isolated...kind of rapey too

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Oy, I can only imagine what it was like before. It feels so narrow, cramped, isolated...kind of rapey too

 

A complete dump very dirty too. When that area was a gigantic region of public housing it wasn't terribly safe either.

 

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Compared to Cabrini Green and it's old surroundings this development is like Paris. Not quite sure what some were expecting. Not every urban neighborhood can be 100% upscale gentrification. This is still a "transition" area at best.

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The architecture of new city is disastrous.  I don't know why they chose such a jumbled collection of materials.  I would have played off the 50's streamline modernism of the station, some of that which is evident in the tower.  Maybe have a total aluminum clad base with nice rounded corners.  That would have been spectacular instead of the clunky brick facades and circus tent metal panel. 

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Meanwhile, a block over from New City....

 

division101.jpg

Source: Me

 

parkside-1.jpg

 

cabrini-green-tower.png

Source: Curbed

 

And, one development I haven't heard much on, but a new building on the City Farm site which is just to the right of the photo I took.  The farm will be moving to a bigger location down the street. 

Screen%20Shot%202014-07-09%20at%209.50.05%20AM.png

 

In the 10 years since I've been living in Chicago and traveling to beforehand, I've taken quite a few photos of Cabrini when the projects were still active, were demolished and then rebuilt as new apartment towers, condos, townhouses, malls and department stores.  Same can be said for Prairie shores which looks like a boomtown these days.

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Meanwhile, a block over from New City....

 

division101.jpg

Source: Me

 

parkside-1.jpg

 

cabrini-green-tower.png

Source: Curbed

 

And, one development I haven't heard much on, but a new building on the City Farm site which is just to the right of the photo I took.  The farm will be moving to a bigger location down the street. 

Screen%20Shot%202014-07-09%20at%209.50.05%20AM.png

 

In the 10 years since I've been living in Chicago and traveling to beforehand, I've taken quite a few photos of Cabrini when the projects were still active, were demolished and then rebuilt as new apartment towers, condos, townhouses, malls and department stores.  Same can be said for Prairie shores which looks like a boomtown these days.

 

Is the white building the one that's going in right across from the Target on Division?  That one looks pretty good.

 

And yeah New City is architecturally pretty terrible, but its a huge upgrade from what was there before.

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Kingsbury Blackhawk....MOAR MALL

 

rtklnewcity.jpg

http://chicago.curbed.com/archives/2015/03/24/new-city-expansion-clybourn-corridor.php

 

The amount of retail in the North / Clybourn corridor is insanity.  I'm liking all the towers going up along Blackhawk but the traffic from all the malls and parking garages has made this area a nightmare.  Just wait until New City opens and all those cars will try to be turning on Halsted.  I don't drive, so yeah...the traffic isn't a big deal to me.  But for anyone who is a pedestrian or cyclist in that area it's a deadly adventure.  Narrow sidewalks, obsolete bike lane design, cars existing hidden driveways, backed up turn lanes. It's become quite a mess.

 

 

 

 

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Now THAT one I like.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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I'm surprised that the 606 a project to create Chicago's Bikeable version of the High Line hasn't been discussed here.  This is an old railroad viaduct turned into trail/linear park (the park is the 606 the trail is the bloomingdale Trail after the rail line the preceded it) that stretches from Ashland Ave in Bucktown all the way over to Ridgeland Ave in Humboldt park.  Its been a bit overcrowded due to it opening recently, with way too many dog walkers and strollers to be an ideal bicycle route, but its a really pretty park and riding on it in spite of the crowds is a lot of fun:

 

https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20150610/humboldt-park/whos-using-606s-bloomingdale-trail-at-3-pm-on-weekday

 

Here's a video of it from one of the editors of Streetsblog Chicago:

 

 

Here's the official website:

 

http://www.the606.org/

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Kingsbury Blackhawk....MOAR MALL

 

rtklnewcity.jpg

http://chicago.curbed.com/archives/2015/03/24/new-city-expansion-clybourn-corridor.php

 

The amount of retail in the North / Clybourn corridor is insanity.  I'm liking all the towers going up along Blackhawk but the traffic from all the malls and parking garages has made this area a nightmare.  Just wait until New City opens and all those cars will try to be turning on Halsted.  I don't drive, so yeah...the traffic isn't a big deal to me.  But for anyone who is a pedestrian or cyclist in that area it's a deadly adventure.  Narrow sidewalks, obsolete bike lane design, cars existing hidden driveways, backed up turn lanes. It's become quite a mess.

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah, this is going to awful, I frequently use the halstead bus as a shortcut to get to the north side - I've got a feeling backups are going to make this quite a bit more difficult once this project comes online :(

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The old megamall in Logan Square (the new Wicker Park as Wicker has been overrun by bros) is getting replaced by an absolutely fantastic looking infill project!

 

http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20150930/logan-square/check-out-total-overhaul-of-mega-mall-replacement-project

 

This is why I harp on Cincy so much to improve its infill.  It can happen, there are architects out there who know how to do much much better and this is it.

 

I'll miss the megamall though, it was a really great little latino oriented flea market even if its building was extraordinarily ugly.

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The NIMBY's have fought hard against this one.

 

Yeah I got in a debate with a friend in Logan Square about this - she didn't understand the basic economics of why having a larger apartment complex would be good for the neighborhood.  Too many people get caught in this myth of small town compact neighborhood even though Logan Square is right off a 24 hour transit line that just happens to be one of the more busy ones in the whole country.

 

I'm generally supportive of city policies that are encouraging station near TOD, because there are large swaths of development near EL lines that are underutilized and in order to keep rent down long term this is the best way to utilize both Chicago's transit infrastructure and support the growing demands for urban living that otherwise would swamp all neighborhoods near transit eventually leading to a San Francisco like gentrification crisis (which won't happen for a long time in Chicago, but the city needs to act now to prevent that from happening later - I have a feeling there will be a point where the growing parts of town will surpass the shrinking parts of town too - the last census was also distorted by the massive amounts of public housing teardowns last decade too...)

 

She also was concerned about gentrification, but I feel this sort of thing addresses it, by providing more supply to meet high demand than a smaller development would provide.  So long as the development looks good I don't have a problem and in its current form it looks pretty great and its totally better than what it replaced asthetically.

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Chicago skyline set for big changes as Plan Commission approves major tower projects http://chicago.curbed.com/archives/2015/11/23/november-plan-commission-recap.php

 

CUgng_zWsAAjz-M.jpg:large


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Lots of ugly staggered windows with grey/silver materials (an architectural trend of the 2010s), but in general interesting projects.  From strictly a functional perspective the one in Lincoln Square is great - it had to overcome a lot of NIMBY push back even though its located at the intersection of one of the most popular bus lines with the brown line train.  Currently only architecturally insignificant low rise buildings exist on that site and Lincoln Square is a very nice shopping district so the density is already in the area though Western is a lot less utilized than the stretch of Lincoln they narrowed to create the square as a "German Village" back in the 1970s (there still are German-American cultural institutions there, but most of the population doesn't really exist anymore as it was mostly last wave post WWII germans).

 

In short its really great for the area.

 

I'm a pretty big fan of the TOD ordnance btw, its a great way to strategically grow parts of the city that are closest to transit lines - perhaps its a way to prevent more of the disaster that is Lincoln Park in terms of de-densifying near transit lines.

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Dear Ohioans, it happens elsewhere too....

 

Chicago's Never Built Skyscraper—Now a Hole in the Ground and a Pile of Dirt https://t.co/VEx7JVAScy


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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If every tower ever planned was built no major city would look the same as it does now. It's astonishing just how many massive buildings are proposed but never make it anywhere.

 

Chicago has no less than three proposals for 2,000 foot tall towers that never got built from the 80s to now. All three extremely interesting in their own manner and would have made a wildly different skyline for Chicago.

 

On top of that there are probably a dozen other supertall proposals that were very serious but never went anywhere for one reason or another. I remember reading somewhere that the moment some company in Chicago proposes a new tallest in the city is when you need to start liquidating any real estate assets you may have because the market is about to crash. And for many decades this has held true.

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Dear Ohioans, it happens elsewhere too....

 

Chicago's Never Built Skyscraper—Now a Hole in the Ground and a Pile of Dirt https://t.co/VEx7JVAScy

 

The height of ''the big short era'' hubris...this hole being an appropriate reminder of the financial greed of the early '00s which, ominously, is all but forgotten today.  Throw in Chicago's built-in hubris and you have the The Spire.  2,000 condos in one building starting at 750K.  Chicago was expecting world-wide investors (Arab oil folks etc.) to own properties in The Spire so they could, I guess, watch Chicago's Air Show and shop on Michigan Avenue.  The one big time contract purchaser was the guy who created beanie-babies.  Hope he got his deposit back since the developer went bankrupt.

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If every tower ever planned was built no major city would look the same as it does now. It's astonishing just how many massive buildings are proposed but never make it anywhere.

 

Chicago has no less than three proposals for 2,000 foot tall towers that never got built from the 80s to now. All three extremely interesting in their own manner and would have made a wildly different skyline for Chicago.

 

On top of that there are probably a dozen other supertall proposals that were very serious but never went anywhere for one reason or another. I remember reading somewhere that the moment some company in Chicago proposes a new tallest in the city is when you need to start liquidating any real estate assets you may have because the market is about to crash. And for many decades this has held true.

 

Chicago has had a few 2,000'+ towers proposed; none, however, got the ''hole'' digging stage like The Spire, but times were different 10 years ago.

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The Miglin-Beitler Sky Needle and 7 South Dearborn definitely got close, but you're right in that they never made it as far as the Chicago Spire. Which is probably because the Chicago Spire started way earlier than it really should have. Financing was questionable to begin with and yet they began digging.

 

I will always have a soft spot for pushing height barriers from a purely engineering-fan standpoint. I find solutions to the exaggerated problems that exist by pushing the boundaries of what we can build incredibly interesting. That's why I don't even care how ostentatious many of these buildings wind up being.

 

Although the Miglin-Beitlier was one sexy Mother-F****r. It would have been THE quintessential postmodern tower.

 

m-b_2.jpg

 

So sexy. Then again, so was 7 South Dearborn.

 

7sd_02.jpg

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The Miglin-Beitler Sky Needle and 7 South Dearborn definitely got close, but you're right in that they never made it as far as the Chicago Spire. Which is probably because the Chicago Spire started way earlier than it really should have. Financing was questionable to begin with and yet they began digging.

 

I will always have a soft spot for pushing height barriers from a purely engineering-fan standpoint. I find solutions to the exaggerated problems that exist by pushing the boundaries of what we can build incredibly interesting. That's why I don't even care how ostentatious many of these buildings wind up being.

 

Although the Miglin-Beitlier was one sexy Mother-F****r. It would have been THE quintessential postmodern tower.

 

m-b_2.jpg

 

So sexy. Then again, so was 7 South Dearborn.

 

7sd_02.jpg

 

That's right, 7 S Dearborn, forgot about that one but I do remember there were a few of these.

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There were a handful of other 2,000+ foot tall towers thrown about but beyond Chicago spire I believe Miglin-Beitler and 7 South Dearborn are the only two that were ever serious enough to actually be a possibility.

 

There's that current 2,000' version of the bundled tube structure Sears Tower uses that's proposed by that Brit that owns the old Post Office that has about a .01% chance of ever happening.

 

I'm curious if the rumors of BIG working on a design for the Chicago Spire site will come true. It's a super prominent site and is perfect for something unreasonably tall. But BIG is terrible with making tall buildings. His 2 WTC proposal in Manhattan is one of the worst towers I've seen in recent years and his proposal for the Hudson Yards is almost equally as bad. He just doesn't seem to get skyscrapers. His smaller structures are hit or miss but are rarely offensively bad. His towers are basically all offensively bad w/ the exception of the W57th Pyramid in Manhattan.

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Arguably the largest project in the country (really a combo of two adjacent, interconnected developments) began in Chicago yesterday. In total the two projects will include 76 acres of utterly unused land in the south loop (whereas New York's Hudson Yards project is 28 acres), and extends from Harrison all the way to 18th street, in between the river and Wells.

 

Groundbreaking of first phase of the project started yesterday (it'll encompass 14 acres) and will end with eight buildings, parks, retail, etc, from Harrison to Roosevelt). I don't know when/if groundbreaking has been scheduled for the 62 acres portion (Roosevelt to basically Chinatown), probably not, but it's all moving forward and will absolutely redefine the south loop and city as a whole.  Very exciting stuff.

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What's it called? Any links? Renderings?


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Ah, this is the site of the former Grand Central Station where B&O trains from Washington, Pittsburgh, Youngstown, Akron and Fostoria called at Chicago until the station was demolished in 1969. Hard to believe this river-side land has sat vacant ever since. You would think this property would have been more highly sought after in the last 47 years...

 

1963_Grand_Central_Station.jpg

 

grandcentralwaiting.jpg

 

n006591.jpg

 

GCChicago.jpg

 

 

 


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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I'm really glad to see construction starting on this huge site. I always felt it was so strange how Chicago goes from such incredible density of the Loop to literally a giant open field and a few big box stores in like 2 blocks. The whole South Loop area (or the parts I've seen of it) feels very....artificial, if that makes sense. This project will definitely help extend Chicago's core southward, though I do wish there could be a little more creativity in the architecture. It looks like there are some interesting features at ground level, but I hate the flat rooflines of all the buildings. Throw in some spires or crowns or something! The latest completed building at Hudson Yards could be an inspiration in this regard.

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The larger plot still is a difficult-to-access tent city with lots of drug paraphernalia. Haven't heard about any violent incidents though.

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At 76 stories and 829 feet, it will be Chicago's 13th tallest building....

 

Crescent Heights’ South Loop development named ‘One Grant Park,’ set to be completed 2019

http://www.rejournals.com/2017/01/04/crescent-heights-south-loop-development-named-one-grant-park-set-to-be-completed-2019/


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Mapping the 44 high-rises under construction in Chicago right now

BY JAY KOZIARZ AND AJ LATRACE  JAN 12, 2017, 12:18PM CST

 

Developers are keeping Chicago architects and construction crews busy in the new year as the Windy City's building boom keeps on rolling. Since August, nine new developments have been added to the list of active projects. Nine previously featured towers—Next, Moment, Exhibit on Superior, Vue53, 1001 S. State, River Point, 108 North Jefferson, MiCa, and the University of Chicago Campus North Residential Commons—have officially opened for business and were removed. The additions include: One Grant Park, Solstice on the Park, 1136 S. Wabash, 1101 S. Wabash, 1411 S. Michigan, 123 E. Cermak, Elevate Lincoln Park, 110 N. Carpenter, and Riverline’s Ancora tower.

 

It's worth noting is that the current level of construction in Chicago rivals the peak levels experienced in the early recession years. This list represents thousands of new apartments and hotel rooms, and even some new downtown office space. The condo market is still thawing out from the deep freeze of the Great Recession, but we are seeing a gradual increase in new condo construction—most notably the supertall Vista Tower underway in Lakeshore East.

 

Note: Map points are listed by building height from the tallest to shortest.

 

MORE:

http://chicago.curbed.com/maps/chicago-tower-highrise-construction-map

 

Vista_Tower.0.0.png

 

451-Grand-new.0.0.jpg

 

150_20n_20riverside.0.0.png

 

This looks like a knock-off of the new Hilton Convention Hotel in Cleveland!

Marriott_20Marquis_20McCormick_20Place.0.0.jpg


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Yesterday the Amazon Bookstore opened in Southport (a half mile west of the Cubs). It was glorious. Good hours, a coffee shop, a large electronics and also children's section, and scanners that will give you multiple prices for books for Prime members and non.

 

https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20170321/lakeview/amazon-books-inside-open-independent-kindle

 

What's interesting is the outcry by other independent bookstore proprietors, and I disagree with their vilifying Amazon.  You should see a few of the bookstores that are utterly falling apart, smelly, damp, dangerously narrow and small, and with exceptionally rude owner-clerks working -  The Gallery Bookstore Ltd (in Boystown) and Bookman's Corner (in Lincoln Park) come to mind.

 

Quite a few bookstores in Chicago are amazing, and it would be horrible if they closed. But to blame Amazon or promote a boycott - to hell with that nonsense. The ones listed below are awesome places.

 

https://chireviewofbooks.com/2017/03/21/12-chicago-bookstores-to-visit-instead-of-amazon-today/

 

 

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Yesterday the Amazon Bookstore opened in Southport (a half mile west of the Cubs). It was glorious. Good hours, a coffee shop, a large electronics and also children's section, and scanners that will give you multiple prices for books for Prime members and non.

 

https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20170321/lakeview/amazon-books-inside-open-independent-kindle

 

What's interesting is the outcry by other independent bookstore proprietors, and I disagree with their vilifying Amazon.  You should see a few of the bookstores that are utterly falling apart, smelly, damp, dangerously narrow and small, and with exceptionally rude owner-clerks working -  The Gallery Bookstore Ltd (in Boystown) and Bookman's Corner (in Lincoln Park) come to mind.

 

Quite a few bookstores in Chicago are amazing, and it would be horrible if they closed. But to blame Amazon or promote a boycott - to hell with that nonsense. The ones listed below are awesome places.

 

https://chireviewofbooks.com/2017/03/21/12-chicago-bookstores-to-visit-instead-of-amazon-today/

 

 

 

Does the coffee shop at the amazon store keep good hours?  Or do they do Chicago hours and close at like 2pm, like 90% of all cafes do here.

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Very good hours. Opens at 6:30am, closes at 9pm I believe (maybe not on Sundays).

 

And if you want to go to the coolest coffee shop in the city, which ironically has the worst hours, check out Kittibtznest on Webster/Clybourn. I've never seen a cafe quite like it.

 

Tourists should make it a point to go there; it's that damn good.

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I'll have to check it out.  I prefer open later instead of earlier (I was spoiled by the Highland in Cincinnati).

 

My fave that has bad hours is Sip, its such a cozy spot (though its closed by like 6pm :/).

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France has attempted to boot Amazon completely out of the country to avoid losing its independent book stores.  The problem in the United States is that so many were already put out of business by Borders and Barnes & Noble before Amazon appeared.  In fact, Amazon launched by piggy-backing on the handful of regional warehousing suppliers to those giant chains. 

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