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Cincinnati: $10M Tri-County Mall expansion

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Pretty much what you all just said, from the 11/16/06 Tri-County Press:

 

 

Tri-County Mall renovation begins in Springdale

 

SPRINGDALE - Crews recently began demolition on the old JC Penney store in Tri-County Mall, starting the renovation project that was anticipated to be completed before the holiday season.

 

Several issues factored in to the late start, said Springdale Administrator Cecil Osborn.

 

Thor Group, the company that bought the mall last year, now has a lesser ownership position, and is primarily responsible for leasing spaces in the mall.

 

Coventry Real Estate Advisors is now 90 percent owner.

 

Osborn said it was the change in ownership that stalled the renovation.

 

"I would hope by this time next year we will see a great bulk of the work finished," he said.

 

 

http://news.communitypress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061116/NEWS01/611160371/1089/Local

 

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Tri-County Mall renovation brings Chicago brewhouse

BJ's, at former J.C. Penney site, could help entice national tenants

LISA BIANK FASIG | LFASIG@BIZJOURNALS.COM

March 2, 2007

 

PHOTO: BJ’s Restaurant Brewhouse is scheduled to open at Tri-County Mall in early 2008.

Courtesy of BJ’s restaurants Inc.

 

SPRINGDALE - Tri-County Mall, which is undergoing a multimillion-dollar renovation to add a glass-enclosed atrium and several streetside storefronts, has signed a new-to-market Chicago brewery chain that could serve as the necessary lure for other national tenants.

 

The restaurant, BJ's Restaurant Brewhouse, will be a 270-seat, "premium casual" eatery that specializes in pizza, gourmet-like pub food and beer supplied by one of its 12 breweries. Some say it could be joined by the Elephant Bar, a California-based chain of 300-seat eateries featuring tropically inspired dishes.

 

BJ's marks the first significant tenant for Tri-County since Ethan Allen signed a year ago. Both will occupy the space once used by J.C. Penney, said Jeff Tulloch, director of economic development for Springdale. That space is being rebuilt and the mall's total project cost is now running north of $10 million, he said. "Our guess is that it will be closer to $15 million plus, and that's conservative."

 

 

http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2007/03/05/story10.html

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From the 7/7/07 Enquirer:

 

 

Tri-County getting theme park

Krazy City will fill part of former J.C. Penney

BY MIKE BOYER | MBOYER@ENQUIRER.COM

 

SPRINGDALE - Krazy City, a family-oriented indoor theme park with a full-service restaurant, plans to open in Tri-County Mall early next year.

 

Pomona, N.Y.-based Advantage Entertainment Centers Inc. said Friday it has leased 50,000 square feet vacated last year by J.C. Penney on the second level of the mall.

 

Krazy City features rides, such as an 18,000-square-foot electric go-kart track, a nine-hole miniature golf course, a two-thirds-scale bowling alley, a build-it yourself toy factory and an assortment of arcade and prize-redemption games.

 

"Cincinnati is the type of market that meets our criteria for family entertainment. Our key demographic is kids 14 and under," said Joseph Moore, president of Advantage, which opened its first Krazy City location in West Nyack, N.Y., last year and is opening in two more malls in New York and Connecticut this fall.

 

 

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/AB/20070707/BIZ01/707070327/

 

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Northgate and Cincinnati Mills both seemed doomed, and with the recent moves of Tri-County it might be headed in the same direction.  The mall era is surely coming to an end.

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Northgate and Cincinnati Mills both seemed doomed, and with the recent moves of Tri-County it might be headed in the same direction.  The mall era is surely coming to an end.

 

I would agree, the suburban mall era is starting to come to an end.

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Agree for the most part, but I actually think that the decent ones that can survive will continue to do pretty well (see Kenwood Towne Center). I wouldn't be surprised that a small movement of folks will latch on to some malls in a sort of retro vibe, with Malls that can summon the 70s through early 90s, which was the peak era of mall culture.

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"I would agree, the suburban mall era is starting to come to an end."

 

 

This is bad news for parents.  From my experience, malls served America as the week-end baby-sitters of teenagers.  What will parents do if there are no malls near-by?

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[This is bad news for parents.  From my experience, malls served America as the week-end baby-sitters of teenagers.  What will parents do if there are no malls near-by?

 

What did parents and teenagers do before malls were built? 

 

I do not think there are enough things for teenagers to do.  I remember getting very bored at times when I was a teenager.

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"I would agree, the suburban mall era is starting to come to an end."

 

 

This is bad news for parents.  From my experience, malls served America as the week-end baby-sitters of teenagers.  What will parents do if there are no malls near-by?

I'm not a father yet but I don't think I'd want my kids becoming mall rats. Even if it is a good babysitter on weekends. TV screens are good babysitters too and I've wasted too much of my childhood glued to one.

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"I would agree, the suburban mall era is starting to come to an end."

 

 

This is bad news for parents.  From my experience, malls served America as the week-end baby-sitters of teenagers.  What will parents do if there are no malls near-by?

 

Drop them off at the lifestyle center.

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I don't think Tri-County is going anywhere, it lost one major store that has a new model and JCPenney stock price has reflected their change in business model. Now Cincinnati Mills and Northgate, who knows. Northgate seems old and outdated, not good with the new Towne Centre (SP? I don't know if we use old English or American English anymore).

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Now Cincinnati Mills and Northgate, who knows. Northgate seems old and outdated, not good with the new Towne Centre (SP? I don't know if we use old English or American English anymore).

 

In the Cincinnati area, "town" always has a silent "e" for some reason.

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And because Krazy City starts on the second level, its floors had to be strengthened to withstand the weight not only of the rides, but of the hundreds of people the 50,000-square-foot park can serve.

 

^Don't think they'll have to worry about that

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Springdale charts plan to revive aging retail row

City hopes ideas serve as road map for private investors

BY LAURA BAVERMAN | CINCINNATI BUSINESS COURIER

March 7, 2008

 

SPRINGDALE - A city of Springdale plan to revitalize its Tri-County retail corridor could spark as much as $100 million in redevelopment and include the repositioning of some properties as mixed-use centers.

 

Springdale nine months ago hired Covington architecture and planning consultant Kinzelman, Kline & Gossman to analyze demographic data and vacancy rates and to discuss the community's commercial viability with property owners, brokers and retailers. The firm and Springdale development director Jeff Tulloch will present initial findings and suggestions to City Council March 11. Officials hope to present plans to stakeholder groups by mid-April.

 

Among the ideas: provide new signage, streetscaping, transportation offerings, economic incentives and development guidelines to encourage private investment.

 

 

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Mind-blowing stuff here.

 

Why don't they rename all of Sprindale "Krazy City" and have a bunch of carnival rides everywhere.  But then again, they'll have to reinforce the concrete floor to support 100s of customers.

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I just visited Tri-County Mall and it's looking quite sad in there. There are a lot of vacancies, especially in the Sears wing. I was also puzzled by their decision to build new buildings on the outlots. Men's Warehouse and Starbucks have moved from inside the mall to one of the new buildings. If the mall is already starting to die, why would you build more retail space in front of the mall and poach your own tenants?

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