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Columbus: Children's Hospital Projects

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Already announced plans include Mt. Carmel East's planned 44-acre campus and OSU's planned 10-story cancer hospital and other expansions. Currently under construction are OSU's 12-story biomedical research tower and Grant's 5-story cardiovascular center, and recently completed projects include Riverside's 6-story McConnel Heart Hospital and OSU's 5-story Richard M. Ross Heart Center.

 

Expanding care

Unprecedented growth aimed at patient attention, research

Wednesday, October 26, 2005

Suzanne Hoholik and Mike Pramik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Hospital officials will announce a plan today to spend $740 million over seven years to add 1 million square feet with new parking, clinical buildings and research labs.

 

The plans:

 

• Most of the money — about $430 million — would be used to build a new main hospital, two research buildings and a parking garage.

 

• About $237 million would be used to update equipment and computers and improve technology to automate patient records.

 

• Nearly $74 million would be used to recruit doctors, nurses and researchers.

 

Children’s is the fifth-largest freestanding children’s hospital — based on number of patient beds — in the United States, according to industry statistics. It has 323 beds. The expansion could bump the number to 400.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2005/10/26/childrens.ART_ART_10-26-05_A1_GIE7OF2.html?sid=101

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So in the last three days we've got plans to add 800 Nationwide empoyees, 800 Grange employees, 1,160 Childrens Hospital jobs, and 1,000 more related jobs.  That's pushing 4,000 high paying jobs planned to be added in less than a week.  :clap:

 

In the whole chicken and egg debate between living downtown and having amenities downtown, I think this comes before both.  You've got to have a densely populated workplace downtown in order to establish your market of homebuyers and renters.  It also puts strains on traffic, adds restaurants, and adds support services which can provide even more motivation to live downtown.

 

 

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They have a fly-over video for the Children's Hospital expansion on 10tv.com and it looks great!  It's good to hear that they are expanding their downtown site and not opting for a suburban hospital campus somewhere in southern Delaware County (hint, hint CSCC).

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Might as well start a thread since they plan a few new buildings in the upcoming years.  From ThisWeek South Side, 11/20/05:

 

 

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL

Plans for new parking garage unveiled

Sunday, November 20, 2005

By MARK A. CLAFFEY ThisWeek Staff Writer

 

Council of South Side Organizations (CSSO) vice president Mike Elicson is not pleased with the plans unveiled Nov. 10 by Children's Hospital for a new parking garage at the corner of Livingston and Parsons avenues.  "There's is no way you are ever going to make a seven-story parking garage fit in at the corner," Elicson said during the CSSO meeting held at the Shamrock Club, 60 W. Castle St.

 

The plans were unveiled by Tracy Mahoney, who serves as community relations manager for the hospital.  Mahoney said the parking garage will be constructed on land already owned by the hospital and will provide an additional 1,500 new parking spaces.

 

Read more at http://www.thisweeknews.com/thisweek.php?edition=South&story=thisweeknews/112005/South/News/112005-News-50581.html

 

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From ThisWeek South Side, 1/1/06:

 

 

Children's Hospital lot expansion raises concerns

By TRISTAN CROWE

ThisWeek Staff Writer

 

A new parking structure for Children's Hospital is the object of some suggestions and recommendations from the Council of South Side Organizations. Mike Wiles, president of the CSSO, said suggestions from members of his group and from community residents were brought before Children's Hospital officials during a meeting several weeks ago in an effort to help make the new structure more acceptable to the neighborhood.

 

Their suggestions include locating modest retail shops on the first and second floors, he said. "What we hope would happen is to see some retail shops on the first or second floor facing Parsons Avenue, so it would blend into the neighborhood better instead of being a regular parking structure," Wiles said.

 

Read more at http://www.thisweeknews.com/thisweek.php?edition=South&story=thisweeknews/010106/South/News/010106-News-73563.html

 

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From Business First of Columbus, 3/13/06:

 

Children's banking land on Livingston

Business First of Columbus - March 10, 2006

by Brian R. Ball,Business First

 

Children's Hospital is expanding its property holdings west of Parsons Avenue for some elbow room as it builds up its Columbus medical campus east of a commercial strip. Business First has learned the hospital has agreed to acquire a shopping center at Parsons and East Livingston avenues for $6 million. The deal is expected to close this month.

 

Children's plans to turn a former supermarket building at the site into offices, a print shop, office technology training and other nonmedical operations. A Kroger grocery store closed last month.  "From our perspective, this is really a long-term, land-banking solution," said Patty McClimon, the hospital's vice president of planning and business development.  "We'd be penny-wise and pound-foolish not to leave a legacy for the next generation of planning for facilities."

 

Read more at http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2006/03/13/story2.html

 

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From ThisWeek German Village, 3/16/06:

 

Children's Hospital purchases Kroger lot

Neighbors view plans for parking garage

Thursday, March 16, 2006

By SUE HAGAN  ThisWeek Staff Writer

 

Children's Hospital is purchasing the Kroger property, located at the Northwest corner of Livingston and Parsons avenues, for future expansion.  The deal was to be closed Tuesday, said Patty McClimon, the hospital's vice president of Planning and Business Development.

 

"This allows us to grow to the west rather than into the neighborhoods to the south and east," she said.  McClimon said the purchase price is $6-million for the 5.87-acre site, which was owned by Bobb's Chevrolet.  She said the hospital will not develop the property until the leases for the four businesses still open there expire.

 

Kroger closed last month when the new Kroger opened in the Brewery District, but a CVS drug store, Rent-a-Center, Family Dollar and Wendy's still are open, according to McClimon. She said the Wendy's lease will expire last, in 2012. "We're assessing our long range plan for the site," she said, adding that it may eventually be developed into medical office space. For now, the hospital plans to use the Kroger building for various internal functions.

 

Read more at http://www.thisweeknews.com/thisweek.php?edition=GermanVillage&story=thisweeknews/031606/GermanVillage/News/031606-News-113902.html

 

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From the 6/4/06 Dispatch:

 

 

ABERCROMBIE & FITCH

Children’s Hospital to receive $10 million

Sunday, June 04, 2006

Mike Pramik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Abercrombie & Fitch Inc. will donate $10 million to Children’s Hospital to provide emergency services at the South Side medical center, the company has announced.  The Abercrombie & Fitch Emergency Department and Trauma Center will be part of a new hospital that Children’s plans to build on its current campus beginning in 2008. It’s scheduled to open three years later as part of a $740 million expansion and recruitment effort.

 

Children’s Hospital said in October that the major components of its expansion would be the new hospital, better technology, more medical personnel and more parking. Children’s has budgeted $430 million to build the new hospital, research buildings and a parking garage. It hasn’t been determined how much it will cost to build the emergency department and trauma center, hospital spokeswoman Pam Barber said.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/06/04/20060604-C1-04.html

 

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From the 6/7/06 Dispatch:

 

 

Nationwide gives Children’s $50M

With $28 million in other donations announced today, expansion effort has surpassed $123 million

Wednesday, June 07, 2006

Jeffrey Sheban THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

The Nationwide Foundation has pledged $50 million to Columbus Children’s Hospital to help build a new main hospital and expand programs in pediatric health care and research. The gift is the single-largest charitable donation for any cause in central Ohio and the second-largest in the nation to a children’s hospital.

 

Columbus Children’s, which is embarking on a seven-year, $740 million expansion of its main campus south of Downtown, will be renamed Nationwide Children’s Hospital in early 2007 in honor of the 10-year commitment, it will be announced today. It joins at least nine other children’s hospitals in being named after a benefactor.

 

"This transformational gift … further cements our ability to be among the world’s leaders not only in pediatric care, but also research and education," said Abigail Wexner, chair of the hospital’s board of trustees. The gift will help Children’s continue its mission of providing care to all children, regardless of any family’s ability to pay, Wexner said.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/06/07/20060607-A1-00.html


From the 6/8/06 Dispatch:

 

 

Neighbors surprised to hear of hospital’s plan for garage

City OKs first part of Children’s proposal for parking structure

Thursday, June 08, 2006

Bob Moser THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Some neighbors are upset that Children’s Hospital might build a seven-story parking garage right in front of their homes.  But Katie Radford, president of the Southern Orchards Civic Association, wonders where they were before Monday’s Columbus City Council meeting to join her in protesting the project.

 

Absolutely nowhere to be found, she said. Radford has weekly meetings, often with hospital spokespersons, about development in the area. Attendance is sparse, to say the least.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/06/08/20060608-D5-00.html

 

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From the 2/5/07 Dispatch:

 

 

CONSTRUCTION ZONE

Children's Hospital expands its plans

Monday, February 05, 2007

Mike Pramik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Children's Hospital is tweaking its master plan for its Downtown campus, seeking a new direction to grow as I-70 and I-71 are rebuilt.  The hospital intends to expand west of the Ronald McDonald House, 555 Children's Dr. W. The 37-room building that provides accommodations for families of Children's patients opened in March 2005, but it would be torn down and rebuilt nearby.

 

In October 2005 Children's announced a $740 million plan that included a new main hospital. Because of the Ohio Department of Transportation's plans to reroute I-70 and I-71, Children's has redrawn its blueprints. The new main entrance to the hospital will be off Parsons Avenue rather than 18th Street, said Patty McClimon, Children's senior vice president for planning and facilities. Other details call for expansion west of Parsons Avenue. Last year Children's acquired several plots of land west of Parsons, including a former Kroger shopping center.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/contentbe/dispatch/2007/02/05/20070205-F6-01.html

 

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From the 2/19/07 Dispatch:

 

Children's building plans rile neighbors

Community will get to air concerns on razing homes for new Ronald McDonald House

Monday, February 19, 2007

Mark Ferenchik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Like other urban hospitals, Children's Hospital has to throw some elbows to make room when it wants to grow. But sometimes the neighbors push back. The latest tussle concerns a plan by Children's to knock down the 2-year-old Ronald McDonald House along Parsons Avenue. A new one would rise at the southeast corner of Livingston Avenue and Ann Street.

 

Building the new center, however, would mean knocking down three houses and four cottages that neighborhood leaders want to preserve. The city would have to give up two alleys to clear the way for the new center. City Councilwoman Maryellen O'Shaughnessy said she plans to put that legislation before the council at its Feb. 26 meeting.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/contentbe/dispatch/2007/02/19/20070219-C1-01.html

 

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Link contains a photo.  From the 2/21/07 Dispatch:

 

 

MEETING WITH SOUTH SIDE RESIDENTS

Children's fields gripes over expansion plans

Wednesday, February 21, 2007

Kevin Kidder and Mark Ferenchik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Children's Hospital officials got a polite earful last night, as they presented their plans to relocate the 2-year-old Ronald McDonald House, which would mean knocking down several old homes in the process. The relocation is part of a $740 million hospital expansion that will begin in 2008 and will include a new entrance on Parsons Avenue, hospital administrators said.

 

The westward shift will be critical once the state builds a new I-70 exit ramp to Parsons Avenue as part of the redesigned I-70/71 split Downtown, said Patty McClimon, Children's senior vice president of planning and facilities. The hospital also anticipates that future expansion will be to its west, just across Parsons Avenue, where it recently purchased a former Kroger lot.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/contentbe/dispatch/2007/02/21/20070221-B1-04.html

 

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From the 2/27/07 Dispatch:

 

 

City allows Children's to take alleys

Council members scold hospital for how it handled Ronald McDonald House

Tuesday, February 27, 2007

Robert Vitale THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Children's Hospital got a heap of scorn last night from Columbus City Council members who said the hospital is shutting neighbors out of a $740 million expansion that will reshape everything around them.  But hospital executives also got what they wanted from the city: possession of two alleyways that will allow their plans to move forward.

 

City Council members voted 5-2 to vacate the alleys so Childrens can build a new Ronald McDonald House for patients' families at Livingston Avenue and Ann Street.  Seven houses that neighbors wanted to preserve could be torn down by the end of the week, said Yvette McGee Brown, who heads the Center for Child and Family Advocacy at Children's Hospital.

 

Read more at

http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/contentbe/dispatch/2007/02/27/20070227-D2-00.html

 

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From the 3/3/07 Dispatch:

 

 

Judge won't stop Children's Hospital from razing homes

Saturday, March 03, 2007

 

Franklin County Common Pleas Judge Beverly Y. Pfeiffer said a "good neighbor" agreement among the hospital, South Side neighborhood groups and residents doesn't provide a legal ground to delay the work.  Pfeiffer said that the hospital expansion is in the public's interest. This is likely the end of the fight, according to Mary M. Simon, who lives in the neighborhood. "I don't know of anything else we can do," she said after the judge's ruling.

 

The hospital owns the buildings and already has permits to knock them down: 693 E. Livingston Ave., 654 Ann St. and 688 Jackson St.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/dispatch/contentbe/dispatch/2007/03/03/20070303-D3-05.html

 

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Children's Hospital gets high billing in U.S. News rankings

 

issue hits newsstands Monday.

 

Columbus Children's Hospital was ranked No. 12 in U.S. News & World Report's first separate ranking of pediatric hospitals.

 

The magazine created a separate list just for children's hospitals this year, and subdivided that list by pediatric specialty.

 

It also changed how the rankings were done, so the results don't compare year to year. Instead of scoring by reputation alone, the magazine polled all 122 hospitals (113 responded) for data including patient volume, death rate, number of nurses and availability of advanced procedures. Reputation is still two-thirds of the score.

 

Ohio fared well in the list, with Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital of Cleveland at No. 5 and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center ranked No. 7.

 

The rankings are available online Friday at health.usnews.com/pediatrics, and the issue hits newsstands Monday.

 

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Rededication of Columbus Children's Hospital as Nationwide Children's Hospital on September 24, 2007

 

There was a special section in this Sunday's Columbus Dispatch about the rededication of Children's Hospital as Nationwide Children's Hospital.  The rededication will be on Monday, September 24, 2007.  To download this special section go to http://www.nationwidechildrens.org and click on the link on the home page or go directly to http://nationwidechildrens.org/GD/DocumentManagement/DocumentDownload.aspx?DocumentID=22598.

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Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2007/09/24/nationwide_childrens.html

 

Hospital, now Nationwide Children's, pledges excellence

Goal of expansion is to become a national leader

Monday, September 24, 2007 - 2:50 PM

By Amy Saunders THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Children’s Hospital changed its name today to Nationwide Children’s Hospital, but that doesn’t just reflect a $50 million corporate donation by the Columbus-based financial-services company. It’s symbolic of the hospital’s future, said speakers at today’s official rededication ceremony.  “We’re reaching a pivotal moment of change in this hospital’s history,” said Abigail Wexner, chairwoman of the hospital’s board of trustees. “Our vision is really one of national prominence."

 

With a seven-year, $740 million expansion project under way, Wexner said she hopes the hospital will become one of the top five or 10 pediatric hospitals in the country by 2012. This year, the hospital jumped 10 places in U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings to become the No. 12 pediatric hospital in America. “We’re only now having our reputation catch up to where we are,” Wexner said.

 

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This is my beef with my hometown. The economy is based on negative occurances, such as sickness, obesity (fast food, hospitals), government regulation and calamities. Sure, there's lots of money in them, but bad things have to happen for Columbusites to make money.

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This is my beef with my hometown. The economy is based on negative occurances, such as sickness, obesity (fast food, hospitals), government regulation and calamities. Sure, there's lots of money in them, but bad things have to happen for Columbusites to make money.

 

^ lol, I never thought of it that way.

 

Yeah, I never thought of it that way either.  Because it makes no sense to turn a positive announcement into a negative. 

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This is my beef with my hometown. The economy is based on negative occurances, such as sickness, obesity (fast food, hospitals), government regulation and calamities. Sure, there's lots of money in them, but bad things have to happen for Columbusites to make money.

 

That is a funny way to think about it ---

But, technically speaking, the insurance industry loses money when bad things happen. They need bad things to happen in order to get people to buy the insurance, but I think they would rather bad things not happen so they would never have to pay people out.

 

And then for Children's hospital -- There are births there, that's a good thing... =)

 

I prefer to think of it as the industry of making things right again =)

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Guest ohio1221

Can't that be said for alot of cities?

When Cincinnatians over indulge in Skyline Chili or Frisch's they turn to P&G (the same company who's soaps help pollute water) for relief & possibly roto-rooter to unclog their toilet. If they drive to veges in a toyota there is a good chance it uses valvoline, & when they get there they will probably lose alot of money on the cards manufactured down the road from where they work. If they bet the house & lose, well I'm sure 5/3 will jump at the chance to forclose. If their insurance lapse & they can't go to Christ, then we always have University! But why do that when you can get a payday loan from Check 'n Go & get further in debt.

 

This is my beef with my hometown. The economy is based on negative occurances, such as sickness, obesity (fast food, hospitals), government regulation and calamities. Sure, there's lots of money in them, but bad things have to happen for Columbusites to make money.

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Insurance is a positive industry.  It allows the pooling of risk to minimize individual exposure.  It also is a large investor in financial and real estate markets.

 

One would have to be rather jaded to view the health care industry as benefiting from negative outcomes.  Preventative care is just one example.  So much of the health care industry is related to R&D - a proactive way of dealing with negative outcomes.

 

Education, as GCrites mentioned, is central to the Columbus economy, and it is certainly based on positives.  Research at Battelle and the universities is productive in nature.

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Guest ohio1221

Less direct to Columbus but equally relative to Cincinnati.

 

Yes, those are all possible situations, but less direct than the Columbus examples.

 

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Children's Hospital tops $200 million in donations

Saturday, November 10, 2007 - 3:39 AM

By Suzanne Hoholik, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Nationwide Children's Hospital is ahead of schedule for its capital campaign, having passed the $200 million mark.  Officials announced yesterday that $207 million of the $250 million goal has been raised with two years left in the fundraising effort.  Children's $740 million expansion includes building a new hospital, two research buildings and a parking garage along with updating equipment and technology.

 

"This campaign will enable us to execute our strategic vision -- to become the best children's hospital in this country," Abigail Wexner, chairwoman of the hospital's board of trustees, said in a statement. "With the continuing support of community-minded individuals and organizations, Nationwide Children's serves not only as a leading local resource but also a national model for providing the best health care available anywhere in the world right here in central Ohio."

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2007/11/10/childrens.ART_ART_11-10-07_B1_G1E7OF2.html?sid=101

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Given that the seemingly ever-expanding hospital has claiomed a lot of local housing, it's nice to see them finally give back to the neighborhood.

 

Hospital renovating homes, providing health care in neighborhood

Wednesday,  September 3, 2008 4:38 PM

By Robert Vitale

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Nationwide Children's Hospital unveiled plans today to improve the health of its neighborhood.  The hospital and city government will begin an effort to concentrate existing programs and create a few new ones to improve housing, health, education, safety and job opportunities in the struggling area around the Children's campus on E. Livingston Avenue.

 

"As the hospital prospers, so does the neighborhood," Mayor Michael B. Coleman said at a news conference in front of two new homes on S. Carpenter Street that replaced others torn down by the city.  Down the street and around the corner, many others are boarded up, abandoned, or strewn with trash and discarded furniture.

 

Neighborhood forces have been at odds more often in recent years. Residents and some City Council members criticized the hospital last year when it quickly moved to demolish historic homes at Livingston Avenue and Ann Street to make way for a piece of its $740 million expansion.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/09/03/southhealth.html?sid=101

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Nationwide Children's kicks off expansion

$800 million project includes $480 million hospital to open in 2012

Tuesday,  September 23, 2008  3:35 AM

By Suzanne Hoholik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

It seemed fitting that kids were on hand yesterday to mark the start of a major expansion project at Nationwide Children's Hospital.  They wore their best dresses and suits and shared their stories about being treated at Children's.  Aaron Young, 7, of Columbus had surgery at the hospital last year. He said the doctors and nurses there made him feel special.  He talked about wanting to be a professional basketball player when he grows up, like LeBron James.  And if that doesn't work out, maybe he could be mayor.  Then Aaron introduced his next-door neighbor, Mayor Michael B. Coleman.

 

The two joined about 1,000 people at the ceremony for Children's new $480 million main hospital, part of an $800 million expansion project.  The new hospital, scheduled to open in 2012, will have all private rooms, a new emergency department and several family lounge areas.  It "will set the standard for what quality child health care stands for," said Dr. Steve Allen, Children's CEO.

 

Full story at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/09/23/Neighbors.ART_ART_09-23-08_B1_VBBDEFE.html?sid=101

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Great to see Children's Hospital making progress on this massive upgrade to their campus.  I found some more info and images on this at the Nationwide Children's website...

 

For more information on the Children's Hospital campus expansion: http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/gd/applications/controller.cfm?&page=9107#/gd/applications/campus_expansion/images/gallery/photo1.jpg

 

For more information on the 2012 Master Plan construction projects: http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/gd/templates/pages/AboutUs/AboutUs.aspx?page=9563

 

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More on this at the Nationwide Children's Hospital website:

http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/gd/templates/pages/AboutUs/AboutUs.aspx?page=10200

 

Healthy Neighborhoods, Healthy Families Program

 

Featuring five areas of focus: Affordable Housing, Health and Wellness, Education, Safe and Accessible Neighborhoods and Workforce and Economic Development

 

Affordable Housing Defined Outcomes:

 

- $3-5 million in seed money over 5-7 years from Nationwide Children’s Hospital

- Net community gain of at least 84-94 homes

- Provide home buyer assistance and education

- Establish home improvements incentive program

- Implement foreclosure reduction program

 

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Children's to add 2,400 jobs

City Council approves tax incentive to pay up to $15 million

Tuesday, December 2, 2008 - 3:09 AM

By Dean Narciso, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Columbus City Council sweetened the pot last night to make sure that the 2,400 jobs Nationwide Children's Hospital plans to add as part of its expansion stay in the city.  During a meeting in which one council member used "monumental" to describe the hospital's hiring plans, the panel agreed to pay Children's the income tax collected on 30 percent of those wages, up to $15 million total during the next 15 years.  The new full-time jobs are expected to generate an annual payroll of $168 million above what is currently paid the hospital's staff of 5,585 employees, city officials said.

 

"It's a competitive environment out there," Councilwoman Maryellen O'Shaughnessy said last night.  "The Dublins and New Albanys of the world are doing these medical research/technology parks," she said.  "And in years past (Children's) has said they could just as easily get support there."  The city expects income-tax revenue on the new jobs to exceed $50 million during the 15 years.  After refunding 30 percent to Children's, the city expects a net gain of more than $35 million.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatchpolitics.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/12/02/copy/COUN02.ART_ART_12-02-08_B1_64C3O28.html?adsec=politics&sid=101

 

 

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City Council OKs tax break for Children’s

Business First of Columbus

Tuesday, December 2, 2008 - 10:32 AM EST

 

Columbus City Council has approved a tax break for Nationwide Children’s Hospital valued at up to $15 million as it plans to add more than 4,000 jobs in little more than a decade.  Council at its Monday night meeting approved the 15-year tax incentive, part of the city’s Jobs Growth Incentive program.  The legislation grants the hospital a 30 percent return of income taxes generated by newly added jobs.

 

Children’s, which employs more than 6,000, has said it plans to add 4,200 jobs through 2020 at its campus southeast of downtown, with about 2,400 of the jobs added by 2013.  The job growth is driven by an $842 million expansion of its campus at Parsons and East Livingston avenues begun in September.  A 12-story main tower is scheduled to open in 2012. The city has estimated the initial 2,400 jobs created in the next five years would generate $3.36 million in annual city income taxes.

 

Read more at http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2008/12/01/daily9.html

 

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