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Cincinnati: Corryville: 2600 Vine Redevelopment

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The good news keeps rolling for Uptown...and I'm glad Towne is right on top of things.

 

Short Vine revitalization gels

BY LISA BERNARD-KUHN | January 17, 2008

 

The Uptown Consortium has hired Towne Properties to help craft a plan that will breathe new life into the retail and entertainment district on Short Vine Street.  All told, the nonprofit development group plans to commit up to $30 million in new market tax credits to the project, which is still in the conceptual stages, said Tony Brown, CEO and president of the consortium.

 

A public meeting is slated for 9 this morning at Turner Hall on West Daniels Street for community stakeholders to share ideas and hear preliminary concepts.  In recent months the consortium has spent more than $6 million purchasing properties around Short Vine from the Vine Street Community Urban Redevelopment Corp.

 

Read full article here:

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080117/BIZ/801170328/1076

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Starting with Bogart's, area could be rockin' new vibe

Business Courier of Cincinnati - by Dan Monk

 

One of Cincinnati's great rock rooms is plotting its revival.  An expansion of the Bogart's club is among a half-dozen projects being pursued by the Uptown Consortium, a development agency that has been working on the revitalization of Corryville's Short Vine business district since 2004.

 

"Short Vine used to be a regional draw for live entertainment and retail. We'd like to bring back the good old days," said Tony Brown, CEO of the nonprofit group, funded by Clifton-area hospitals and the University of Cincinnati.

 

Read full article here:

http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2008/02/25/story8.html

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Bogart's probably remains the key to reinventing Short Vine. It is the best spot for live music near the UC campus. I used to hit at least one or two shows a year, but after about 2003 there just wasn't much to see anymore.

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Uptown Consortium moves on Short Vine purchases

http://www.building-cincinnati.com/2008/07/uptown-consortium-moves-on-short-vine.html

 

The Uptown Consortium's development team has purchased nearly two acres of property in anticipation of its Short Vine redevelopment plan.

 

Earlier this month, they purchased the following 25 parcels from the Corryville Economic Development Corporation for $2,876,894:

 

* 13 W Charlton Street, 2600 and 2634 Vine Street: 0.40 acres, includes an office building and the Holy Grail Site, $785,734

* 2619 Glendora Avenue: 0.09 acres, includes Kauffman-Jacobs/Rookwood Pottery office building, $414,204

* 2713 and 2721 Glendora Avenue and 2710-2712 Jefferson Avenue: 0.26 acres, includes a three-family and a two-family dwelling, $389,111

* 2910 and 2920 Vine Street: 0.26 acres of vacant land, $334,964

* 2906 and 2916 Vine Street: 0.25 acres of vacant land, $210.548

* 2606 Vine Street: 0.05 acres, includes a commercial office building, $203,000

* E Martin Luther King Drive and Eden Avenue: 0.25 acres of surface parking lots, $172,267

* 21 E Daniels Street and 3016 Ahrens Street: 0.08 acres, includes a single-family dwelling, $139,971

* 19 W Charlton Street and 2607 and 2613 Glendora Avenue: 0.17 acres, includes a single-family dwelling, $136,568

* 2627 Vine Street: 0.10 acres of vacant land, $90,527

 

The mixed-use redevelopment is part of the Corryville University Village Urban Renewal Plan, which was adopted by City Council in March 2005.

 

The plan envisions the reconnection of Short Vine to Taft Road, a redeveloped Kroger store of 35,000 to 65,000 square feet, and ground floor retail with housing and office uses above.

 

Three parking garages, located at the center of blocks, would make the development possible.

 

No formal announcements regarding the development have been made, but the Uptown Consortium has said that it could begin as early as next year.

 

Towne Properties has been hired as the development partner for the project.

 

Anchor Properties, which owns the nearby University Plaza, plans to start a redesign of the complex by late 2009.

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Ah.  I gotta get things sorted out.  That fenced off area that used to be the rundown parking garage, that was supposed to become a Golds Gym right? so what's going in place of that?

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Ah.  I gotta get things sorted out.  That fenced off area that used to be the rundown parking garage, that was supposed to become a Golds Gym right? so what's going in place of that?

 

That was a VERY preliminary idea for that spot.  That locale has always been listed as one of the later phases for CHCRUC who is in charge of the areas along Calhoun/McMillan from Clifton to Vine/Jefferson.  Right now as far, as far as I know, there are no definitive plans for the site you speak of.  There might be something that will come up with Towne Properties' development plan...we'll just have to wait and see.

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Here are some renderings I came across.  These are for a potential infill project along Short Vine.  I wasn't initially aware of plans for a movie theatre, but it would make sense to have a main stream theatre right around campus to compliment Esquire.  I can't figure out exactly where this would be, so fill us in if you know.

 

1.

Cinema1.jpg

 

2.

Cinema2.jpg

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is the Short Vine cinema just an idea or is there land and a developer to actually make this happen  soon? The renderings were the first I ever heard of it....

 

I don't think that street will ever be a big business district unless it is opened back up to WHT. Just not enough traffic flow and busses to make it worth anything...

 

 

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$42M project would bring 100 units, theater to Short Vine

http://www.building-cincinnati.com/2009/05/42m-project-would-bring-100-units.html

 

Design concepts for the redevelopment of the east side of the 2600 block of Short Vine have been presented to the Corryville Community Council.

 

The $42 million project, to be developed by JFP Group, would include 100 units of market-rate housing, a Danberry 10 screen first-run movie theater, an eight-lane bowling alley, a Martino's sports bar, and a series of parking decks.

 

The developer plans to seek federal New Markets Tax Credits to finance the project and would likely build the development in phases.

 

JFP Group plans on seeking final approval from the Corryville Community Council on June 9.

 

Last month, Cincinnati City Council approved the use of tax increment financing (TIF) district funds to pay for streetscape improvements along the 2600 to 3000 blocks of Short Vine.

 

0905182600vine01.jpg

 

0905182600vine03.jpg

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This is much closer to the UC and could seriously rev up that district and the buildings on that block aren't exactly historic.

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wow, let me be the first to say...KNOCK THAT SHIZ DOWN NOW! Short Vine is a MESS and hardly any students use it...it's all shady mobile phone shops and "urban wear" stores.

 

Between this, the Hampton Inn on the corner of vine, and the Calhoun-McMillian project, there could be ALOT going on in this area in the next few years. Really exciting!

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I worked for many years in the southernmost building on this block.  I would be very sad to see it go.  A beautiful old building lovingly cared for.  Short Vine is mostly a mess because this group has been buying up everything and leaving it half vacant.

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This is much closer to the UC and could seriously rev up that district and the buildings on that block aren't exactly historic.

 

While there are some buildings many wouldn't batt an eye at, there are a few that would be a shame to lose, mostly because thy actually have been well-maintained over time.  The cost and benefit of this new development is likely to be very controversial, but knowing the weakness of the Corryville community council in the past, this project won't meet much if any opposition.

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Prospective development  caused the Vernon Manor to close and i do not like development either.

 

Having a theater close to campus will cause the Esquire to close.  Which will start the slow demise of ludlow

 

Who will take Martinoes old spot?.. ..... Another Wireless store that sells weed.

 

The only thing that is needed in this area is more student housing.  McMillion manor should have been built hear at least it would have brought money to uptown, not to the taco bell on mcMillion which just sped up the process of turning another surviving neighborhood to  the demise of urban sprawl.

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Has there been any hard evidence to support the claim that prospective development is what led to the closure of the Vernon Manor?

 

As for Esquire I have often wondered this too...if a new mainstream theatre would damage Esquire's business and lead them down the path of closure?  I'm not sure, Esquire is kind of an experience theatre and it shows a lot of independent films that aren't show at the mainstream theatres.  Definitely don't want to cause any harm there though.

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Did ya look at the map? This project is on the Martino's block and in fact includes a new Martino's (could they own some of this land?).

 

Danbarry could theoretically compete with the Esquire, but Danbarry's generally don't carry the sort of films Esquire does.

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Over the past few years, The Esquire has started showing fewer indie films and more mainstream ones.  I imagine that if the Danberry showed mainstream movies, the Esquire would go back to what it was a few years ago.  It's also interesting because I have never seen a "first-run" Danberry theater; all of them that I've seen have been second-run.

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Sadly, the Indie movie world hasn't done a very good job producing the right kinds of movies recently. We are a long way from the art movie heydays of the mid-90s.

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I think the Esquire would still do fine if this new theater is built. They show different types of films, and really cater to the Clifton and Northside communities.  Ludlow is a strong business district, and with a 30,000+ student university, as well as all the residents in Clifton, Northside, Walnut Hills, Corryville, and Mt. Auburn, I see this working just fine.  As it is now, if people in these neighborhoods want to see most mainstream movies they go to Newport.

 

I definitely think this project should go through.  Help breathe some life into Short Vine and stop Corryville's bleeding.

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Why the hell is this happening on Short Vine instead of one of the CHCRC blocks?  Or the Kroger's superblock? Or on the block just to the north, where Kinko's used to be? Or just on the south part of this block...I see a repeat in allowing 5/3's sad branch remain ala the Ohio Ave. Shell station. 

 

This is one of the city's great city blocks and I'm in disbelief that it would be singled out to be completely bulldozed.  A block like this is the product of infinite individual and eventually anonymously authored decisions, whereas this South Campus Gateway imitation is the product of market analysis by boring people for boring people. 

 

I personally have a ton of memories from this block, from my band playing Sudsy's on New Year's Eve to getting food poisoning at Subway to drinking at the Sub Galley on Xmas with my brother while some homeless lady smoked crack next to him. 

 

Dave, I distinctly remember hanging out one night at the BW3's with of all people Joe Policastro and Miles Grier, at the Perkin's with Gavin Bogosian, and seeing Mike Holman get punched by a Bogart's bouncer after pointing a pointer laser at him. 

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I really hope that these buildings are not demolished. While some of them are not significant, this is one of the best remaining business districts left in the city. I would love to see them put this in the kroger block and reconnect short vine to vine, but i know that looks like its just a dream now.

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I don't know how I feel about this one.  Short Vine is really not frequented by students, and this development would probably promote more student use, but there's already the huge vacant blocks along Calhoun, and the former Kinko's area on short vine that could use a face lift. 

 

Just strikes me as odd to demolish an entire functioning city block.  I agree with the post above about LA fitness... it won't attract a single student/professor who can work out at the great UC Rec Center for free. 

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The only people the LA Fitness will attract are non UC faculty/students.  From what I remember the rec is pretty expensive for the public and I think the fee while on co-op was getting to be a little high.  But even so I doubt there is enough demand. 

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this has got to be the dumbest development idea I have seen in awhile.  Tearing down that section of Short Vine is completely idiotic.  This better not happen.  And hello, there is a field of dreams between Calhoun and McMillan ready for this type of crap.  come on. 

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Original development plans for "McMillan Park" showed a movie theatre and concert venue being incorporated into the project.  Now that those have been dropped in favor of office space, I can see the need to add them elsewhere.  But why not at Corryville Crossing or elsewhere?  It seems like such a waste to tear down these buildings.

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Short Vine is such a crazy street. Even if it doesn't have the sort of businesses you'd like, there are lot of perfectly viable businesses in the corridor. Not every business district needs to be filled with young professionals. Some can be a bit seedy (and honestly the crowd Bogart's draws can hardly be considered seedy) with tattoo shops and punk venues. Why tear down viable businesses? What happened on Calhoun when we tried that? Why not implement this project on Calhoun?

 

I don't think this is a bad idea for Short Vine and I think it would be successful. Certainly better than the Kroger redevelopment plan. I just don't think you have to necessarily tear down viable businesses to do it.

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The only people the LA Fitness will attract are non UC faculty/students. From what I remember the rec is pretty expensive for the public and I think the fee while on co-op was getting to be a little high. But even so I doubt there is enough demand.

 

All----UC employees (staff/faculty) have to pay a membership fee to use the Campus Rec.  So there might be a market for LA fitness.

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There are also a lot of employees at University/Children's/Christ/EPA. Who owns this land?

 

If it is Martino's, well then we know why this is happening there and not on Calhoun.

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The only people the LA Fitness will attract are non UC faculty/students. From what I remember the rec is pretty expensive for the public and I think the fee while on co-op was getting to be a little high. But even so I doubt there is enough demand.

 

All----UC employees (staff/faculty) have to pay a membership fee to use the Campus Rec.   So there might be a market for LA fitness.

 

But it's part of the required fees, I don't think you can opt out of it, sort of like the technology fees.  The fee for students on co-op is $80 / quarter, so it's not too pricey.  $27/month is probably cheaper than LA I would guess?

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The only people the LA Fitness will attract are non UC faculty/students. From what I remember the rec is pretty expensive for the public and I think the fee while on co-op was getting to be a little high. But even so I doubt there is enough demand.

 

All----UC employees (staff/faculty) have to pay a membership fee to use the Campus Rec. So there might be a market for LA fitness.

 

But it's part of the required fees, I don't think you can opt out of it, sort of like the technology fees. The fee for students on co-op is $80 / quarter, so it's not too pricey. $27/month is probably cheaper than LA I would guess?

 

No, employees are not required to get a UC RecCenter Membership.

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^Surely there is a market for a second gym in the area.  Keep in mind there are about 7 hospitals very close to this, each with tons of employees.  Not everything in the area must be directed towards UC students.

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The new UC Medical Science Building  has a gym in it.  So I don't know that there is a market for a second gym.  Who knows.

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I was told by someone at the Uptown Consortium that these recent set of drawings are just placeholders.  They plan on changing these over time with significant community input.

 

The tenants mentioned are also not inked yet, but are people they have been in serious negotiations over a decent period of time.

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lets hope the community input results in a re-use of the existing buildings or a decision to not move forward with the project all together.  Tearing down a single structure is the most ridiculous idea. 

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Pins, pedestrians for Cincinnati's Short Vine

Bowling, movies, apartments part of $40M plan

Business Courier of Cincinnati - by Dan Monk

 

A $40 million mixed-use development in Corryville’s Short Vine business district would place 192 apartment units, a 10-screen Cineplex and an upscale 12-lane bowling alley across the street from a newly expanded Bogart’s nightclub.

 

That’s the vision being pursued by a development group that includes Marty “Mop” Angiulli, owner of Martino’s bar and restaurant on Vine Street, and Corryville Crossings developers Jeff Jacobs and Burgess Doan.

 

Read full article here:

http://cincinnati.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/stories/2009/08/03/story1.html

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this cannot happen.  lets move these ideas to calhoun.  If those buildings are torn down, it would be a true travesty. 

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So, the proposal is to tear down the majority of an entire neighborhood business district for a megadevelopment.  Meanwhile, there's plenty of vacant land *held* by developers that don't have enough money move forward with their projects.

 

I'm truly astounded that nearly all of you support this development, all because you think Short Vine today is bad news.  What about the buildings themselves are bad news?  What really should be under discussion is what can truly be done to promote revitalization of the Corryville CBD, *not* redevelopment of it.  This is NOT the answer.

 

It's quite interesting that because Corryville is comprised of a higher percentage of rental properties (and therefore, less opposition to horrible garbage projects such as this), the soul of the neighborhood can easily be sacrificed in favor of THIS.

 

I'm appalled!

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I'm truly astounded that nearly all of you support this development, all because you think Short Vine today is bad news.

 

From my seat the general consensus has been that this proposal is a bad idea.  Where have you seen all of this love for this proposal on here?

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