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thomasbw

Cincinnati Streetcar / Cincinnati Bell Connector News

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Yes. Well, at least south of 12th. Same with basically all of Race in OTR. Those will forever be one ways. Walnut and Elm could easily become two-way though at some point if we're looking for conversions in the future.

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Doesn't the placement of the tracks on the left side of Main preclude the street from becoming two-way?

 

Yes, it could only become two-way between Liberty and 12th. Traffic southbound would have to turn right onto 12th.

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Doesn't the placement of the tracks on the left side of Main preclude the street from becoming two-way?

 

Yes, it could only become two-way between Liberty and 12th. Traffic southbound would have to turn right onto 12th.

 

Well I'm definitely pulling for two-way conversion wherever possible.

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One way streets move more cars faster so that's what traffic planners prefer. Two way streets slow traffic, which makes it safer for bikes and pedestrians, and makes it easier to access businesses, so that's what urbanists and business owners prefer.

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San Francisco used to have a cable car that travelled in the opposite direction as traffic on a one way street.

 

Some traffic planners, urbanists, or business owners prefer one-way streets, and some prefer two-way streets. There are pros and cons to each.

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San Francisco used to have a cable car that travelled in the opposite direction as traffic on a one way street.

 

Some traffic planners, urbanists, or business owners prefer one-way streets, and some prefer two-way streets. There are pros and cons to each.

 

I think urbanist consensus is forming in favor of two way streets.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/04/17/why-one-way-streets-really-are-the-worst/

 

Jeff Speck also talks about this in Chapter 5 of Walkable City. 

 

Business owners are just like the general public, some will oppose changes of any sort, even if it would help them in the long run. And a lot has been written about how the numeric goals of traffic planners can be at odds with the well being of a city overall.


www.cincinnatiideas.com

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Early in my real estate career, I worked for a large developer with operations in many states. We had a project in Lexington where the state highway department wanted to improve the four-laner in front of the project I was managing, a combination of apartments and retail. The planning study promised that if the improvements were made -- I think turning lanes and maybe some widening, can't recall -- then the speed of the roadway would increase to, say 35 mph from 25 mph. Again, can't recall, just remember that it was a significant increase. And my company, as a major property owner fronting the road, was asked to make comments on the plan.

 

I wrote a report to the CEO of the company, saying I thought it was a good idea, that the more traffic the road moved, the better for the retail part of our project. A few days later, I was traveling with the CEO and asked him what he thought. His answer: "I'll tell you, John, one thing I've learned in real estate over the years .... if you can slow traffic in front of your land, you will increase its value." That simple, confident Texan response -- he was from Dallas -- has kind of stuck with me over the years.

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Looking for an editorial cartoon called Old Cincinnati (I think) and had some old curmudgeon who kept saying no every time anyone had an idea, probably five or six times before saying "what part of no don't you understand?"

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Looking for an editorial cartoon called Old Cincinnati (I think) and had some old curmudgeon who kept saying no every time anyone had an idea, probably five or six times before saying "what part of no don't you understand?"

 

It was in the Business Courier in 2013.

 

 

hoffecker-03-01-13-cincy-progress-color*600.jpg

 

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Looking for an editorial cartoon called Old Cincinnati (I think) and had some old curmudgeon who kept saying no every time anyone had an idea, probably five or six times before saying "what part of no don't you understand?"

 

It was in the Business Courier in 2013.

 

 

hoffecker-03-01-13-cincy-progress-color*600.jpg

 

 

THANKS!!!!

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Enquirer sues SORTA over streetcar information

 

The Enquirer filed a Wednesday lawsuit asking the Ohio Supreme Court to force the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority to provide the public with access to documents regarding the operation of Cincinnati's streetcar.

 

The suit accuses SORTA, a transportation entity in charge of deciding which company will operate the controversial streetcar project, of violating Ohio's Open Records laws by refusing to provide Enquirer reporter Jason Williams with the documents when asked in a March 30 letter.

 

Williams filed his request asking to review documents submitted by companies responding to a SORTA request to bid on the estimated $4 million per year contract to maintain and operate the 3.6-mile, $148 million streetcar. Bidding is done in an attempt to encourage competition to control costs.

 

Cont


"It's just fate, as usual, keeping its bargain and screwing us in the fine print..." - John Crichton

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^ From the looks of it the Enquirer is trying to use a bit of a loophole. Ohio Revised Code allows counties and other governments to keep competitive bids secret until a contract has been signed, however the language specifically regarding transit agencies is a bit vague and doesn't seem to have that exception.

 

I could see the suit going either way - it's obvious that state law allowed for competitive bids to be free from public disclosure prior to a contract being awarded, but the laws governing transit agencies don't duplicate that specific item, as they probably should.

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Anytime the enquirer can use the word streetcar in a headline they will do it. And suing SORTA certainly does that...the city/county/state gets bids for many different kinds of projects that are not released to the public.

 

But this will be/is spun so that "the city is holding secrets back" about the streetcar and make it look bad just to keep spinning the wheels on the subject.

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Enquirer is not likely to win this case. Governmental agencies are allowed to have a RPF process and are not required to release bids while the RFP is in progress. This is simply a stunt to get attention and another chance for them to use the phrase "controversial streetcar project".

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Enquirer is not likely to win this case. Governmental agencies are allowed to have a RPF process and are not required to release bids while the RFP is in progress. This is simply a stunt to get attention and another chance for them to use the phrase "controversial streetcar project".

 

The memo they posted alongside the filing shows their claim is that "Ohio Revised Code Chapter 307 applies specifically to Boards of County Commissioners —not Regional Transit Authorities."

 

They're trying to find a loophole to get around the fact that bids don't have to be made public until a contract is awarded, for reasons that should be obvious to all. There's no logical reason a transit authority would have to publish bids while the rest of the government doesn't, and hopefully that's how a judge sees it.

 

 

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I don't even click on The Enquirer's streetcar articles anymore.  I don't care what they report, it always serves the agenda to purposefully roil public opinion.  Besides, usually the same six people make comments and talk past each other.  The Enquirer's worked hard to make the issue controversial because they've never been on our side.  They wouldn't have endorsed Cranley if they were, or allowed Barry Horstman to get away with his hack reporting about it.  So the agenda must come from On High. 

 

As far as this public disclosure issue goes, I'm cynical enough to believe they want to help cause operating costs to increase, or cause any other trouble whatsoever that they can.  They probably consider talk radio as major competition since so many knuckleheads around the region rely on it as a news source.  Thus the inflammatory reports, over and over, year after year.

 

 

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My office looks out over the skywalk on Walnut between Fifth and Fourth Streets.  Yesterday they were putting up a catenary pole pretty close to the skywalk and it hit me.  How is the catenary wire going to handle the skywalk obstruction?  The whole thing is really messing with my brain for some reason every time I look out that window.


"Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago." - Warren Buffett 

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Overhead wire goes underneath obstructions all the time.  Not a big deal.  The Skywalk could have an insulative panel installed and the wire may even be secured to it.

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Sometimes when streetcars travel in tunnels the overhead wire becomes a rail that is embedded in the tunnel's ceiling and the vehicle's electric pickup travels along that. 

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The Skywalks are a difficult section according to the project managers.  The streetcar wire will actually come down a bit more than normal (tighter squeeze) under here. Generally it's about 19 feet above the ground.  Under the Skywalks it shrinks to around 18 feet and change, meaning the pantograph will have to adjust downward, then back up.

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3rd street closes in 8 minutes at Walnut.  By Monday morning the Streetcar system will be a continuous set of tracks for nearly 3 miles.  :clap: :yap: :wink2: :drunk:

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The Skywalks are a difficult section according to the project managers.  The streetcar wire will actually come down a bit more than normal (tighter squeeze) under here. Generally it's about 19 feet above the ground.  Under the Skywalks it shrinks to around 18 feet and change, meaning the pantograph will have to adjust downward, then back up.

 

All the more reason to get rid of more skywalks!

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At the end of that clip, The streetcar has to turn left across 5 lanes of traffic??? Accidents will happen.

 

That's why the streetcar gets a special signal phase.  Regular traffic won't get a green light when the streetcar needs to make that turn.  Same at Central Parkway and Walnut. 

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At the end of that clip, The streetcar has to turn left across 5 lanes of traffic??? Accidents will happen.

 

There will be accidents, but only when careless drivers run a red light.

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That was cool.  How long was it in real time?  (Barry Horstman would have been faster.)

 

That was at 4× speed, but I also edited out a few traffic jams and long traffic lights. I also did not include the part of Main between 2nd and Court where track construction hasn't started yet.

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In Travis's video at 3:30 (

), you can see that they recently installed a new mast arm for the traffic signals at the corner of 2nd and Walnut. Is that specific for the streetcar? The new mast arm looks much better than the mess of wires that currently holds the signals and signs.... but the new mast arm doesn't look long enough to direct all lanes of traffic, so I'm worried we're going to end up with the mast arm *and* all those signs on wires.

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New mast arms are being installed all along the route, so that the overhead wire does not have to cross under a wire holding traffic lights. Sometimes this results in the traffic lights being in a slightly strange configuration. See 1:23 in the video.

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