Jump to content
David

Cincinnati: Bicycling Developments and News

Recommended Posts

Conveniently, there will be a station right next to my home and another right next to my office. I can see myself getting a membership and using it to get to and from work, simply because I would not have to carry my bike up the stairs when I get home (I live on the third floor and have no bike parking or common area on the ground floor).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For $80 you could rig some kind of pulley system outside a window. It'd pay for itself in a year & you wouldn't have to worry about getting a bike before everybody else in the building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For $80 you could rig some kind of pulley system outside a window. It'd pay for itself in a year & you wouldn't have to worry about getting a bike before everybody else in the building.

 

I don't think that would comply with historic regulations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geesh Quimbob, did you forget to take your meds this morning?  I'd expect more from you than the typical "if I can't think of a good reason something will work for me then it must not work for anybody." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, you go out to ride your bikeshare buke to work & none are available. You walk, but since you only allocated time to ride - you're late.

Boss asks you why you are coming in late frequently.

You tell him there wasn't a bike lying around waiting for you at the bike rack.

that'll fly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Makes me wonder what happens if you show up to return your bike and the whole rack is full.  Probably not an issue day-to-day, but could be a problem when riding to a major event like Opening Day. 

 

They try to regularly reallocate the bikes around the city so that it doesn't happen frequently. But on Capital Bike Share here in DC, if your return dock is full, you enter your code at the station and it gives you an extra 15 minutes to find an open nearby dock. Granted, that doesn't help the fact that you might have to walk further, but at least you don't get charged extra fees for going over the time limit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand the appeal of bike share in Cincinnati.  The walking distances in the basin are very short, and for whatever reason people keep coming up with excuses to not bike up the hills.  I grew up on the west side and biked up and down the giant hills all the time.  If you got off and walked your bike, you were a wuss.  Now if you call people out for tweeting endless photographs of their bike but never riding the thing up any of the hills, YOU'RE the one with the problem. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand the appeal of bike share in Cincinnati.  The walking distances in the basin are very short, and for whatever reason people keep coming up with excuses to not bike up the hills.  I grew up on the west side and biked up and down the giant hills all the time.  If you got off and walked your bike, you were a wuss.  Now if you call people out for tweeting endless photographs of their bike but never riding the thing up any of the hills, YOU'RE the one with the problem. 

 

1) The streetcar is a pedestrian accelerator. The bike share...same sort of thing.

2) Its use is limited in the basin (on the Ohio side), which is why it needs to be expanded to NKY ASAP.

3) It doesn't matter if current cyclists are biking up hills or not. Suppose they are. The more casual riders to which the a bike share will mainly appeal will not be riding up hills. At least that's my educated guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, you go out to ride your bikeshare buke to work & none are available. You walk, but since you only allocated time to ride - you're late.

Boss asks you why you are coming in late frequently.

You tell him there wasn't a bike lying around waiting for you at the bike rack.

that'll fly

 

Maybe that's true for typical 9-5 jobs, but that's not what my job is like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, you go out to ride your bikeshare buke to work & none are available. You walk, but since you only allocated time to ride - you're late.

Boss asks you why you are coming in late frequently.

You tell him there wasn't a bike lying around waiting for you at the bike rack.

that'll fly

 

Honestly, when I was living in DC, I never saw an empty bike rack. There were always a couple of bikes available. The only time I could imagine this being a problem is during events downtown like Oktoberfest or Taste of Cincinnati. This is not an issue in other cities I've seen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If a rack is too popular, I'm sure they could extend it with more bike slots or add another rack next to it. Not being able to park where you want to is probably a bigger concern. But if it works in other cities, why wouldn't it work in at least the flatter parts of Cincy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure that I'd use this personally, but it sounds like something that is successful in other cities and it isn't very expensive (comparatively), so why not give it a shot?  It gives people another transportation option, which I think is always a good investment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has there been any motion any of you know of on the bike share? The word is a June launch, but in order to make that I'd expect they should be getting bikes delivered and starting to install racks...I don't know...now-ish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wait, what?? I thought he campaigned on building bike infrastructure. Especially including dedicated lanes and cycletracks. And I thought he backed that project specifically??

 

I viewed it as one of the consolation prizes of him being elected. Not to mention his support of the bike share, and riding anywhere but the streets (aside from the limited network of shared use paths) being illegal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes I wonder if he's mentally ill...he doesn't seem to be doing a very good job of placating the populous, or even wooing the people with money.  WTF is his game plan?  Does he even have a vision for the city, or is he all random opinions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wait, what?? I thought he campaigned on building bike infrastructure. Especially including dedicated lanes and cycletracks. And I thought he backed that project specifically??

 

I viewed it as one of the consolation prizes of him being elected. Not to mention his support of the bike share and riding anywhere but the streets (aside from the limited network of shared use paths) being illegal.

 

I heard he said those quotes from 2 different people on monday...

 

Pro,

I thought his gameplan was to divide bike and rail supporters by pinning them against each other.  Now, I'm not so sure.  These statements are bizarre and have no political advantages. My guess is either he was upset by a question asked or just had a temporary honest brainfart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also recall Cranley saying no to any new bike lanes (they take space away from cars!) but that he was supportive of separate paths.

 

Apparently construction work on Delta Avenue has started with signs to pay attention as a new traffic pattern is coming (bike lanes).  I wonder if Cranley has tried to put the kibosh on this or if he's leaving it alone since it's already been designed and approved by both the Mt. Lookout and Columbia-Tusculum community councils, on top of receiving overwhelmingly positive feedback through the city's outreach program.  Of course that hasn't stopped a few vocal busy-bodies from opposing bike lane projects in Hyde Park and other neighborhoods.  I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if Cranley didn't even know about this project, and a few of those cantankerous types like Carl Uebelacker will come out of the woodwork in opposition to this project and get Cranley's full ear while the rest of the process is ignored.  This is one to stay on top of and be vigilant about. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He probably heard a group of NIMBYs complaining about bike lanes, and determined it was probably a consensus opinion among his base. Or a policy advisor reported said experience & analysis.

 

We desperately need a goddamn permanent city manager. It seems like Cranley is trying to do that job, in addition to what he was elected to do, and he hasn't the aptitude for it (to put it lightly).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He probably heard a group of NIMBYs complaining about bike lanes, and determined it was probably a consensus opinion among his base. Or a policy advisor reported said experience & analysis.

Hyde Parkers

I've grown used to anti-bike people who are poor & uneducated. They see buying a car as a rite of passage. They see adults on bikes as "playing" while they have to "work hard".

That certainly isn't Cranley but he does court that demographic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2014/04/09/cincinnatis-next-big-transportation-fight-a.html

 

Next big transportation fight...Central parkway bike path

 

"Mayor's top aide says he wants to figure out a solution that will ensure bike track gets built but doesn’t hurt businesses along the route"

 

Of course.  The Classic Cincinnati 'I'm for ____...Just not this plan'

 

'I'm for light rail, just not metromoves'

 

'I'm not against streetcars at all.  I like them.  I'm just not for this plan' 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm well acquainted with that area & have biked it for decades. (in the 80s the sewer grates ran in line with traffic. Used to scare the hell out of me. They're diagonal now.) Central, Spring Grove & McMicken as well. I don't think there's any reason to mess with most of it. Right turning motorists are the biggest problem.

I don't like my allies much, tho...

If I were Haines, I'd be more worried about CityLink.

Apparently the Northside Community Council is on board, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quimbob, the main advantage of dedicated infrastructure for bikes is that it makes people who otherwise wouldn't take a trip by bike consider doing it. (Also, parents are more willing to let kids take trips by bike, which can greatly increase their mobility and quality of life.) I know you're a vehicular cycling advocate, but the fault with that approach is you fail to achieve the safety-in-numbers critical mass.

 

Assuming a static number of cyclists, vehicular cycling is probably safer. But since dedicated infrastructure increases cycling modeshare, it makes for a safer cycling environment. Also it can be used for road diets/traffic calming (which the engineer quoted in the BizCourier piece notes is true of the proposed Central Parkway plan).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a win-win solution for Central Parkway bike lanes: simply allow parking on the southern side 24-hours a day. That would keep the businesses happy and be a better solution for traffic calming. Bikers win. Businesses win. It means incoming rush hour traffic wouldn't have two lanes to fly down, and that'd be fine by me. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for Delta Ave re-striping, this looks perfect:

 

Delta Avenue between Columbia Parkway and Erie Avenue (excluding the Square) is scheduled to be repaved in early 2014. Delta Avenue currently has two lanes in each direction (a 10-foot travel lane and an 18-foot shared travel/parking lane).

 

The Department of Transportation and Engineering (DOTE) is developing a new lane configuration that would include:

 

  • one 10-foot travel lane in each direction;
  • a center two-way left turn lane;
  • bicycle lanes; and
  • on-street parking on both sides of the street

 

http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/bikes/news/delta-avenue-restriping-project/

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2014/04/15/exclusive-mayorcranley-freezes-central-parkway.html

Executive Mayor John Cranley halts Central Parkway Bikeway project. Seelbach and others thinks this overreaches his mayoral boundaries.

 

the Napoleon Complex That Walks Like a Man strikes again!

 

If Cranley wants to halt a previously approved project, he needs to get the new Council to sign off on that.  Guess he's not confident that he has a majority on Council to back him...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely, Cranley is warming up his crowbar for those bollards.

Surprisingly, he supports this project (and the Wasson Way).

 

Sherman, Sherman, Sherman... Now I have traced where I got the idea that Cranley supported this project. I knew I read it somewhere!

 

You peddler of false hope and false information, you! :whip:

I forgive you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

City council voted unanimously to apply for tiger funds to study Wasson way. 

 

John cranley said they can always look at rail Later.

 

This is not true.  If Wasson way proceeds as planned, without a reversion clause which it currently doesn't have, there will be no rail east of 71. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An interesting contrast to today's opinions of bicycles & cars sharing the road.

 

In the early 1970s, California was implementing a policy of forcing cyclists off the roadways onto bikeways, using the excuse that this would make cycling much safer, but actually, as events proved, with the intent of making motoring more convenient, regardless of the danger to cyclists.

http://www.johnforester.com/Articles/Safety/Cross01.htm

 

But nowadays it's the cyclists who want to abandon their rights to the road.

https://medium.com/p/47528a053745

 

So what has changed in 40 years?

Seems like a race to the bottom...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Alternative proposed for Central Parkway bike track

Chris Wetterich Staff reporter- Cincinnati Business Courier

 

Cincinnati transportation officials offered to alter the Central Parkway bicycle track on Monday, proposing to pave part of a tree-lined park district-owned right-of-way near a building in the 2100 block of the road.

 

Under the idea, between four and 15 trees would have to be removed and the right-of-way paved at a cost of roughly $110,000. The cost would be added to the $625,000 current cost of the project.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2014/04/21/alternative-proposed-for-central-parkway-bike.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

COMMENTARY: Agree to Central Parkway bikeway compromise and move on

Chris Wetterich Staff reporter- Cincinnati Business Courier

 

 

“Always with you it cannot be done.”  Sometimes I think Yoda was talking to Cincinnati instead of Luke Skywalker.

 

Protected bike lanes are the latest urban innovation other cities did years ago that Cincinnati is just now planning today. The city has a plan to put in protected bike lanes along Central Parkway that eventually will connect downtown and Uptown.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/blog/2014/04/commentary-agree-to-central-parkway-bikeway.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

City council voted unanimously to apply for tiger funds to study Wasson way. 

 

John cranley said they can always look at rail Later.

 

This is not true.  If Wasson way proceeds as planned, without a reversion clause which it currently doesn't have, there will be no rail east of 71.

 

It's not clear to me why this is the case.  While I believer the Wasson bike route is pretty stupid on its face (there is plenty of room, and plenty of bikers, who use Erie Avenue), why wouldn't the City be able to take the route through eminent domain?  Passenger inner-city rail is a clear and obviouse public use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

COMMENTARY: Agree to Central Parkway bikeway compromise and move on

Chris Wetterich Staff reporter- Cincinnati Business Courier

 

 

“Always with you it cannot be done.”  Sometimes I think Yoda was talking to Cincinnati instead of Luke Skywalker.

 

Protected bike lanes are the latest urban innovation other cities did years ago that Cincinnati is just now planning today. The city has a plan to put in protected bike lanes along Central Parkway that eventually will connect downtown and Uptown.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/blog/2014/04/commentary-agree-to-central-parkway-bikeway.html

 

Does anyone know what "Mann's Bend" would look like? I just hope we don't have a ridiculous looking section of the cycle track just because of one whiny business owner and a council that wants to exterminate every decision made by the previous administration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the street view. The grass & trees would be removed & paved over so cyclists & pedestrians, some with mobility issues, can share a wide piece of sidewalk.

KillerTrees_zps0cdc01de.jpg

Here is what nobody mentions. The building backs along Central Avenue where there appears to be some parking available....

The parking lot on the right also belongs to the Mohawk Building.

MohawkAerial_zps040810f3.jpg

 

FWIW, if the city gave the building owner permission to use it, he could knock out a wall in his basement and let people enter via Central Ave, drive through & park in the subway tunnel.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are entrances in the back and a stairway to the left/north from where there used to be a pedestrian bridge which the WECC had demolished.

Some of the building entrances on Central Ave are loading zones so it's not all continuous parking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mann's Bend (if it becomes the final design) will be an embarrassing testament to this Council's willingness use scarce public dollars to satisfy one individual business's request, at the expense of the environment (cutting down mature trees in favor of free on-street parking), our budget (spending extra dollars that are supposed to be dedicated to bike programs), and geometry (the Bend will be offensive to anybody who knows how to draw a straight line).

 

As a side note, Cranley's interview with Urbanophile was... extremely frustrating. He paints himself as such a good Urbanist (espousing the values of slowing down traffic), but at the same time he's raising the false alarm about "this hugely negative impact on business". I don't suspect this will be proposed, but if Cranley really believes in traffic calming, then the best way out of this mess would be just keep the on-street parking during rush hour (limiting traffic to one lane each way).

 

There’s got to be a win-win solution. And, frankly, from a pro pedestrian urban friendly point of view, you always want to save on street parking. On street parking slows down traffic because when you’re driving, you’re worried you’re going to hit the car’s windshield or mirrors. And what I want to see is pedestrian friendly, urban friendly neighborhoods and city, and so I’m very loathe to see on street parking to be taken away. Now, they’re talking about taking away just during rush hour but it has this hugely negative impact on these businesses, including a more sympathetic case of this Parkinson’s group, which then really have a very hard time getting to where they’re trying to go.

 

http://www.urbanophile.com/interviews/cincinnati-mayor-john-cranley/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ The quote shows a complete misunderstanding of the value of on-street parking as a buffer, indicating that he probably heard it as a sound-byte and wants to use it to sound intelligent.  The thing is, the lower the speeds the less parked cars are needed as a buffer.  Also, and this is the critical one for Central Parkway, you don't need to use parked cars as a buffer if you have a planted buffer zone instead.  There's already something like 12 to 15 feet of lawn/tree buffer between the roadway and the sidewalk.  That's plenty.  It's when the sidewalk is right up against the curb that those parked cars become critical. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it's still nice to have a buffer of parked cars, even with a landscaped barrier. But with a landscaped barrier, a bike lane, and a row of plastic bollards, I think a barrier of parked cars is quite unnecessary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Probably won't happen, but I like Michael Moore's gumption!

 

City says it can move ahead on bikeway alternative without council vote

Chris Wetterich Staff reporter- Cincinnati Business Courier

 

Cincinnati’s top transportation official said the city can implement changes he proposed to the Central Parkway bikeway without a City Council vote, but the plan remained in flux on Thursday.

 

Speaking to council’s transportation committee, Michael Moore, the director of transportation and engineering, said unless there is council action between now and May 1, he plans to implement a revised version of the bikeway. Tweaks are often made to plans after council approves them, and this one is minor enough not to require a vote. May 1 is the deadline for the city to present a signed contract to the Ohio Department of Transportation for the work.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2014/04/24/city-says-it-can-move-ahead-on-bikeway-alternative.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cranley holding a press conference now with bike enthusiasts about bike share and about building 3 trails in next 5 years...At least one over an existing rail line without a reversion to rail clause.

 

In doing this, I believe his plan is to create a wedge between rail & bike supporters as well as kill future chances for rail. Its a way to kill 2 birds with one stone

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cranley holding a press conference now with bike enthusiasts about bike share and about building 3 trails in next 5 years...At least one over an existing rail line without a reversion to rail clause.

 

In doing this, I believe his plan is to create a wedge between rail & bike supporters as well as kill future chances for rail. Its a way to kill 2 birds with one stone

 

Everyone's been suspecting this about the Wasson line to begin with.  Anyone who owns property in Hyde Park or east of that point stands to gain massively from the transit line, yet those people are nowhere to be seen. 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...