Jump to content
David

Cincinnati: Bicycling Developments and News

Recommended Posts

BTW, that on-street bike corral installed in Northside is built sturdy!  If a car were to run into that, it would get the raw end of the deal.  Very well done, and for minimal price.  My sources at City Hall tell me a few more are coming for other parts of the city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not seeing very many people use it though, unfortunately. Most of the day on a sunny Saturday, the corral was completely empty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not seeing very many people use it though, unfortunately. Most of the day on a sunny Saturday, the corral was completely empty.

For me, locking my bike out front of where I am going (so I can keep an eye on it) is still kind of a habit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cincinnati's Ride of Silence

 

It's unfortunate that over 700 cyclists are killed each year while riding, many of them occurring in the cities and suburbs. With the Ride of Silence, this is a chance to educate motorists that cyclists have the legal right to the roadway and to watch out for us.

 

The Ride of Silence is akin to a funeral procession, where it progresses from start to finish (at Fountain Square) in a double-file line, masked in silence to honor the fallen cyclists. The ride will be slow, with a maximum speed of 12 miles per hour.

 

The goals include honoring those who have been injured or killed, to raise awareness that cyclists are here, and that we all share the road.

 

The Cincinnati Cycle Club has organized this year's Ride of Silence for Thursday, May 20. Three rides, departing from Newport and Cincinnati, will converge at Fountain Square for a ceremony at 7:30 PM. There will be a series of speakers, and the return rides will begin by 8 PM.

 

Participants are being asked, if possible, to wear a Cincinnati Cycle Club jersey and a black armband to honor those that have been lost, or a red armband to remember those who have been injured by an automobile.

 

If you are unable to participate in any of the rides, the Club invites any and all to come to Fountain Square.

 

Each ride begins at 6:30 PM.

 

# Northern Kentucky: Newport High School, Jason Reser leads (jreser@reserbicycle.com 859- 261-6187)

# Cincinnati: Ault Park, 3600 Observatory Avenue, Steve Wegener leads (stephenwegener@hotmail.com 513-351-9004)

# Northwest: Winton Montessori School, 4750 Winton Road, Big Dave Riemenschneider leads (bikemiles@fuse.net 513-373-5387)

 

For more information, contact John Chester (Taxfun1@fuse.net 513-541-1828). More Cincinnati cycling news can be found at http://www.cincyrides.com and http://queencitybike.blogspot.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good to hear that one of the early projects will be Riverside from downtown to Delta. This is one of the heavier cycling routes, given the lack of a viable alternative. I bike this route weekly, and I encounter about 5-30 cyclists on a given ride, depending on the time of day. I usually bike in the "parking" lane -- i.e. the right lane, but will merge over if the lane encounters a parked car, which is fairly rare in many areas. Not a big issue for me, but can be for many others, especially novices who can just merge over without signaling or looking.

 

Given that there is not a shortage of parking along Riverside, the elimination of one side of parking and the creation of two 4' bike lanes out of that should be no major issue. The city will have to diamond grind out some thermoplastic markings from newly paved roads, but at least the city is being proactive.

 

City plan to add 440 miles of bike lanes draws praise, criticism, questions

By Steve Kemme, Cincinnati Enquirer, May 20, 2010

 

HYDE PARK - A proposal to create 440 miles of bike lanes in Cincinnati over the next 15 years drew criticism, questions and praise at a Hyde Park Neighborhood Council meeting Thursday night.

 

Some residents expressed concerns about the city bike plan's impact on traffic safety. Others wondered about its cost and whether the city would be able to keep the bike lanes in good condition.

 

"In order to make these bike lanes, some traffic lanes will have to disappear," Gary Wollenweber said. "Parking will disappear on some streets."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huge bicycle trail network to be pitched to Cincinnati council

By Dan Monk, Business Courier of Cincinnati, June 18, 2010

 

Cincinnati would establish a 445-mile network of off-street bike trails and on-street cycling routes under a new transportation plan that will be presented next week to Cincinnati City Council.

 

The Cincinnati Bicycle Transportation Plan calls for a 13-fold expansion of what is now a 33-mile collection of poorly connected bike paths all over town. By 2025, the plan would establish more than 330 miles of newly designated street lanes where markings indicate rights of way for cyclists. And it would add about 83 miles of off-street bike facilities, including bike trails and shared-use paths for cyclists and pedestrians. The goal is to establish a “continuous and usable network of improvements” that can help cyclists use city streets for recreation and commuting. The plan can be downloaded at http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/bikeplan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a variety of stories I've published over the past month that haven't been shared on this thread:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the new biking rules recently discussed, I have a question somebody here might be able to answer.  Do all traffic laws apply to cyclists as well as motorists? Are there any laws specific to cyclists?  There seems to be a lot of lawlessness surrounding biking.  If there are laws, they certainly aren't enforced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been ticketed for riding on the sidewalk, riding the wrong way on a one-way, riding without a light at night, and was arrested once for "reckless operation of a motor vehicle".  I didn't go to jail but they threw the bike in the cruiser and made someone pick me up from the state highway patrol station.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the new biking rules recently discussed, I have a question somebody here might be able to answer. Do all traffic laws apply to cyclists as well as motorists? Are there any laws specific to cyclists? There seems to be a lot of lawlessness surrounding biking. If there are laws, they certainly aren't enforced.

Theoretically bikes are supposed to follow all the rules cars do.

I have never been ticketed. I have ridden on sidewalks (about ran into a bike cop who was riding on the sidewalk too), run stop signs in residential areas & when I was a younger man, exceeded the speed limit.

When I was a kid in Springfield a cop told me he hoped I got run over to teach me to not ride at night.

That being said, with all this "special" junk, I don't know what the rules will be. I swear all this crap is just going to take something pretty simple & make it a giant PITA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Mind letting us know what you were doing?

 

The main problem was that when the cop was running my driver's license I asked him sarcastically "so am I a menace to society?".  He didn't like that.  The dude actually showed up to court two months later and wouldn't drop the charges, costing me thousands in fines, lawyer fees, and inflated car insurance, even though I didn't own a car at the time.  When I did get a car again I had to pay some kind of $800 fee just to get insurance, before paying an inflated rate.  Keep in mind this is the same state trooper who pulled over my friend's girlfriend and made her sit in his cruiser for an hour while telling her his life story.     

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

  "Are there any laws specific to cyclists?"

 

    Ohio laws:

 

  Bicyclists must ride with, not against, other vehicular traffic. Only when walking a bicycle is a cyclist permitted to travel facing traffic.

 

    Bicyclists are required to obey all traffic signs, signals, and pavement markings.

 

    Bicyclists must use appropriate hand signals before turning or stopping.

 

    Bicyclists must keep to the right edge of the roadway, allowing faster traffic to safely pass. Cyclists can travel in thye middle of the lane if they are proceeding at the same speed as the rest of the traffic or if the lane is too narrow to share safely with a motor vehicle.

 

    Bicyclists should not pass other traffic on a hill or at an intersection.

 

  Bicyclists must stop at a curb to allow emergency vehicles to pass.

 

    Bicyclists must observe speed restrictions in school zones and speed limits in general.

 

    State law also permits local governments to regulate bicycle operation, such as requiring bicycle licensing and registration. Bicyclists must familiarize themselves with local ordinances to be properly educated about all laws affecting them.

 

    Bicyclists must never ride on the freeway, or attach themselves to other vehicles using the roadway.

 

  Bicyclists should ride only on the permanent attached seat of the bicycle.

 

  Passengers should not be carried unless the bike is equipped for it, and at least one hand should be kept on the handlebars at all times.

 

    Bicyclists should ride no more than two abreats in a single lane, except on paths set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles.

 

    Every bicycle ridden after dark must be equiped with a white headlight, a red tailight, and a red rear reflector.

 

  No bicycle shall be operated unless equipped with a bell or horn audible to at least 100 feet away.

 

  Every bicycle must have an adequate brake.

 

  A motorist must:

 

    Share the road with bicycles. The bicyclist has the same right to use the public road as any other driver, except freeways.

 

  Maintain a safety zone of approximately three feet between the car and the bicyclist.

 

  Pass a cyclist only when it can be done safely.

 

  Leave ample room for turning right after passing a bicyclist so the bicyclist is not cut off when the motorist slows for the turn.  :police:

 

 

 

 

     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Bicyclists must keep to the right edge of the roadway, allowing faster traffic to safely pass. Cyclists can travel in the middle of the lane if they are proceeding at the same speed as the rest of the traffic or if the lane is too narrow to share safely with a motor vehicle.

 

This is one I wish more people understood.  Most motorists see such a maneuver as deliberately trying to impede traffic, when it's simply the cyclist trying to stop following motorists from making a (sometimes mutually) dangerous move.

 

There's another law that doesn't specifically apply to bicycles, but to any slow moving vehicle, and it relates somewhat to the situation above.  It basically states that it IS legal to pass a cyclist (or moped, or whatever) even in a no passing zone, as long as they're going less than half the posted speed limit, and of course only if the sight distances allow it to be done safely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The City of Cincinnati is soliciting feedback on the proposed changes to Madison Road.  http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/madisonroad/  They want to change it from 3 lanes each way with parking on the outside lanes limited to non-rush times, to two lanes each way with a center turn lane and a bike lane along each curb, with no street parking.  As simple as it sounds, there's so many benefits to doing this, not only to cyclists but to pedestrians and motorists as well, that it should be strongly encouraged.  I sent in my feedback, send yours. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

City adding bike lanes to Central Parkway, Spring Grove Avenue, Linn Street

By: Randy A. Simes

August 25, 2010 – 3:00 pm

 

As summer draws to a close, Cincinnati city officials will be installing several miles of new dedicated bike lanes and sharrows. According to the Cincinnati Department of Transportation & Engineering (DOTE), crews have already introduced bike lane symbols along Spring Grove Avenue, between Crawford Avenue and Mitchell Avenue, and will be completing the separation line later this week.

 

Other city streets to be improved later this summer include Central Parkway, between Brighton Place and Hopple Street, and Linn Street from W. 6th Street to Gest Street.  In total, the projects account for approximately two-and-a-half miles of new bicycle facilities.


“All truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.”
-Friedrich Nietzsche

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Word is that the proposed change to Madison Road between Torrence/Grandin and Dana has received very positive community support, so the the changes to add bike lanes there are almost certain to be implemented.  The city just this week started working on replacing the curbs, so repaving shouldn't be too far off (finally!). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bike paths, bike lanes, and roads with no specific bike facilities cater to different segments of the riding population.  Yes there's overlap, but the most timid riders generally won't touch a bike lane.  Even so, the new path is unfinished, so it basically goes from nowhere to nowhere, with no obvious start or end point either.  I don't know what sort of plans they have for finishing it, but whenever it might be finished is going to be a long time out, and it won't help those who already use Spring Grove.  An odd thing about it also is that there's very few curb cuts that allow you to get onto the thing.  I've ridden along there a few times, and thought about trying it out, but I could never get on it because there's so few connections and a guardrail in the way.  It's kind of bizarre. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

   Interesting that they are marking bike lanes on Spring Grove when they just built a separate bike path next to Spring Grove. I guess city planners don't talk to each other.

 

Big difference between a recreational trail and a bike lane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Queen City Bike Receives $10,000 Grant for Bicycle Friendly Destinations

 

New Program to Get More People Riding Bikes to More Places

 

CINCINNATI (August 30) – Queen City Bike announced today that it has received a $10,000 grant from The Greater Cincinnati Foundation (GCF) to help launch a new program to get more people riding bicycles to more places in the region everyday.

 

The Bicycle Friendly Destinations Program will work with area employers, retailers, government agencies, and arts and cultural organizations to make it easy for people to reach and use their facilities on a bicycle. The overall goal of the project is to increase the use of bicycles for all kinds of trips, whether to work, to go shopping, or just to run errands in the neighborhood.


“All truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.”
-Friedrich Nietzsche

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Word from the city is that Erie Avenue is going to be put back the way it was, due to excessive whining from a small set of Hyde Park residents.  With this year's funding for the bike program nearly exhausted, and the fact that Erie is already a pretty easy road for cyclists, they probably aren't going to add sharrow markings either, at least not yet.  The changes to Madison Road are still going to proceed though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Word from the city is that Erie Avenue is going to be put back the way it was, due to excessive whining from a small set of Hyde Park residents.

 

:roll:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the Queen City Bike Facebook page:

 

After months of delays, Cincinnati Department of Transportation and Engineering is making a decision RIGHT NOW about whether or not to include bike lanes on a critical stretch of Madison Road. We have learned that some opponents of making the city bicycle-friendly are quietly working to stop this!

 

We urgently need as many people as we can to send an e-mail immediately to Tim Jamison, Acting City Engineer, while copying Mayor Mallory and the City Council, explaining why it is important to them personally -- and to the city and region -- to start making these much-needed improvements on Madison Road right away.

 

A copy of a suggested message and correct e-mail addresses are below. We are sharing this to help you draft your own message. If you already ride Madison or live in an adjacent neighborhood, let them know!  If you would start to ride if their were bike lanes there, let them know that, too!

 

The affected section of Madison Road is between Grandin Road and Dana Avenue. DOTE originally  proposed a change in the lane striping in order to make it a complete street. You can view their original proposed changes here: www.cincinnati-oh.gov/madisonroad.

 

The result would be two travel lanes in each direction, a center two-way left turn lane, and bicycle lanes. DOTE believes this will calm traffic and improve Madison Road for motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists. These proposed bike lanes would connect to the sharrows through O'Bryonville, and the new bike lanes on Dana Avenue.

 

We believe DOTE may be wavering in their commitment. That's why they and your elected officials need to hear from you right away!

 

Thank you for your help!

 

Gary Wright, President

Queen City Bike

 

P.S. Be sure to ask Mr. Jamison for a response in your message!

 

DRAFT E-MAIL MESSAGE TEXT FOR YOUR PERSONALIZATION

 

TO:  tim.jamison@cincinnati-oh.gov

 

CC:mayor.mallory@cincinnati-oh.gov,roxanne.qualls@cincinnati-oh.gov, jeff.berding@cincinnati-oh.gov, leslie.ghiz@cincinnati-oh.gov,laure.quinlivan@cincinnati-oh.gov, wendell.young@cincinnati-oh.gov, cecil.thomas@cincinnati-oh.gov, chris.bortz@cincinnati-oh.gov, chris.monzel@cincinnati-oh.gov, charlie.winburn@cincinnati-oh.gov

 

Tim Jamison, Acting City EngineerDepartment of Transportation and EngineeringCity of Cincinnati

 

Dear Mr Jamison,

 

I am writing to urge you to follow through on plans to put bike lanes in both directions on Madison Road between Grandin and Observatory when it is repaved and restriped in the next few weeks.

 

Madison Road is the essential link for bicyclists traveling between Hyde Park, Oakley, and Madisonville to the east,  and Walnut Hills, Evanston, Avondale, Clifton, and Downtown to the west. The Bicycle Master Plan enacted by City Council just a few months ago recognizes this by calling for bike lanes along most of its length.

 

Increasing ridership significantly is a specific objective of the City's environmental plan in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  We will not be able to achieve that objective without implementing the Bicycle Master Plan's recommendations for Madison, a major commuting route to and from the city's two major employment centers in Downtown and Uptown.

 

I personally ride this route frequently from Walnut Hills to Hyde Park on business and to go shopping.  Bike lanes on this stretch will make my journey easier, and will encourage more people to use their bicycles for shorter trips. They will also directly benefit the neighborhood business districts along the route by getting more people out of their cars and onto the street.

 

The most cost effective way of getting started and increasing bicycle ridership immediately is to add these lanes now.  As part of a road diet, this will also calm traffic and enhance the livability of neighborhoods along this corridor.

 

Can you confirm for me that bike lanes are included in your plans for immediate action?

 

Sincerely,

 

[YOUR NAME]

[YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD]

 

cc:  Mayor Mallory and City Council Members

 

 

About Queen City Bike: Queen City Bike is a non-profit organization that promotes bicycling as a safe and healthy means of transportation and recreation in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Learn more about us at www.QueenCityBike.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a photo of Madison Road with the reconfigured lanes.  This is just the first of two layers of asphalt, but they have to adjust all the manhole covers and drains and such before they do that final layer.   

 

madisonbikelanes.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well so far yes, but there's still the chance of motorists raising a ruckus before the final paving and line painting is done, which could be a month away still. People need to ride AND drive the road in the meantime, then write the city to say how much better it is for both.  That should help balance out messages from those who are no doubt going to complain just because they don't like change. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are there any really good bike maps of Cincinnati? I'd love to take on a couple of its hills sometime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hyde Park Neighborhood Council is having meeting on Wednesday evening, primarily to speak about the re-striping of Madison Road. I believe they invited city people to present. But from what I've heard, they're not excited about it.

 

7pm @ Knox Presbyterian Church, i believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cincinnati quickly falls behind on bicycle transportation goals

By: Randy A. Simes, UrbanCincy.com

 

A year after Cincinnati approved massive bicycling reforms little progress has been made in terms of on-the-ground improvements. The city installed only 2.3 miles of on-street facilities in 2010, and currently only has a total of 15.6 miles of on-street facilities city-wide. The number pales in comparison to the Phase 1 goal of 91 miles of on-street facilities by 2015.

 

To meet the Phase 1 goal, Cincinnati will have to install 75.4 miles of on-street facilities over the next three years. That equates to approximately 25.1 miles annually which would be a 991 percent increase over what was accomplished in 2010.

 

Full story, external links and charts available here:

http://www.urbancincy.com/2011/02/cincinnati-quickly-falls-behind-on-bicycle-transportation-goals/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ I hope they actually installed it on Main, in front of a business. The Norwood one is just far enough out of the way that it usually makes more sense to park on the sidewalk closer to where you're going!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it's on Main Street just north of where 12th heads east. It was previously a no parking zone.

 

The one in Northside is directly across the street from many of the business attractions in Northside...so I'm not sure what your beef is there. Is it underutilized?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see a lot of people using it, but I can't say I am there all that much. "Across the street" is an important phrase. When you can lock up to a pole on the same side of the street of the place you're going, most cyclists are inclined to do that. It's especially nice when you can watch your bike from the window of a shop or restaurant you're patronizing.

 

I think Quimbob criticized the location either on his blog or on this site. I'm inclined to agree with him. I don't see why they didn't just put it in front of the tavern. That would have been a far superior location, and it only costs one car spot for many bike spots.

 

It seems like they were hedging their bets that it might not get used, and so would be criticized for taking up a car spot. In doing so, they made it much less convenient and I would bet less used. Part of the appeal of cycling is parking directly outside where you're going, wherever that might be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well there was certainly push back for the first on-street bicycle parking in the city, and I think city staff tried to choose a less disruptive location while also providing a good location.

 

In Northside the issue is that at many times there are very few places to lock your bike, so the addition of this on-street parking would add significant capacity. I totally get what you're saying about keeping it within view, but that's going to be a problem regardless of where you site one of these since they don't extend the entire block or neighborhood business district stretch.

 

With all of that said, you're right, the west side of Hamilton Avenue right in front of Northside Tavern (or thereabouts) would have been a far superior location.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with that - the times that I've been on a group ride, we've used the Northside corral, but I rarely saw more than one bike parked at it at a time. Most of the time, they hooked the bikes to the signs and fixtures along Hamilton in front of the businesses. Much more convenient, I suppose, and you avoid having to dart across Hamilton.

 

The Main Street corral is practically in front of Park+Vine, which is a good and visible location.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm wary of using a corral since it's in the street, but I'd be much more wary if it was on a busy street like Hamilton.  While no more vulnerable than a parked car I suppose, it just doesn't feel like a safe place to leave my bike when it can be behind the curb and away from fast traffic.  Also, does that stretch of Hamilton Avenue have rush-hour parking restrictions?  That would make the corral a no-go there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am almost positive there are no rush hour restrictions there, and if there are then that's stupid.

 

I wouldn't worry about getting hit by a car using that corral. It's protected and sturdy (as the new one also appears to be).

 

Very glad to hear about the positioning on Main. In front of Park + Vine is the perfect spot. I think it will get much more use than the Northside one, due to its convenient location. Thanks, Sherman, for your anecdote about the Northside corral.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hamilton has rush hour restrictions. They were actually expanded from 4-6 in both southbound and northbound right lanes to 3-6 just recently. Main Street - no.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to see a couple concrete poles protecting the Main Street corral. I can see it being taken out fairly easily by a tipsy driver or someone swerving to avoid a pedestrian (aka jaywalker), etc.


"It's just fate, as usual, keeping its bargain and screwing us in the fine print..." - John Crichton

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think more permanent barriers, other than thermoplastic and the breakaway-plastic poles with reflectors, is needed at the bike corrals and at the motorcycle/scooter parking spaces in downtown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hamilton has rush hour restrictions. They were actually expanded from 4-6 in both southbound and northbound right lanes to 3-6 just recently. Main Street - no.

 

Huh. Okay, then I guess I see why Hamilton was not a viable place.

 

Then I guess I would advocate something like this along the sidewalk:

 

Google Maps

 

I wonder how the costs compare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8f36595ec8ea4010b966d44d91119037_7.jpg

 

The new bike path, which extends for all of three blocks, along Mehring Way/US 27, is ready for use. Except that it really doesn't connect to anything, but it's a start. I'm curious as to how it will extend further east - I assume it will follow the former Cincinnati Street Connecting Railway tracks to the Boathouse, and then use a modified Riverside Drive, which has four or so options on the table for bike inclusion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This photo was taken by Michael Providenti from the Bicycle Thursday Slow and Steady Ride group:

Main Street bike corral...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...