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Where can I buy a bike in Cincinnati? The place near UC has bikes ranging from like 600-3000, unfortunately I'm looking for something in the vicinity of CHEAP AS HELL.

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Where can I buy a bike in Cincinnati? The place near UC has bikes ranging from like 600-3000, unfortunately I'm looking for something in the vicinity of CHEAP AS HELL.

I would recommend used before buying a "department store" bicycle.  Those Wal*Mart-price bicycles get out of tune quickly.  Look into a "single speed" if you ride somewhere with scant hills.  You will save a lot of money and the bike won't be attractive to thieves.

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Where can I buy a bike in Cincinnati? The place near UC has bikes ranging from like 600-3000, unfortunately I'm looking for something in the vicinity of CHEAP AS HELL.

BioWheels moved out to Milford or something.

They had $200 - 300 bikes

After that there is always Schwinn.

There is also the Queen City Bicycle co-op which appears to have a dead website. They are in the West End I believe.

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Where can I buy a bike in Cincinnati? The place near UC has bikes ranging from like 600-3000, unfortunately I'm looking for something in the vicinity of CHEAP AS HELL.

I would recommend used before buying a "department store" bicycle.  Those Wal*Mart-price bicycles get out of tune quickly.

 

I'll second that! Department-store and discount-store bikes are often made with inferior materials that won't hold up, and sometimes they come right out of the box with mismatched components that will never fit right or work right.

 

Shop the name-brand bikes in reputable bike shops to get some idea what you would really like to have, and then see how close you can come to it in a used bike from the classifieds or from a bike shop that takes trade-ins. Once in a while you can get lucky and score something really nice from a thrift store for a cheap price if you know what you're looking for and your timing is right. With spring coming, you might even find someone who is graduating or leaving school and wants to sell a bike.

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Improving Cincinnati's bike scene

BY RANDY A. SIMES | URBANCINCY

November 14, 2007

 

CINCINNATI - Cincinnati is great...it's a very walkable city that has interesting streetscapes that do not completely bend over backwards to accommodate the automobile. I also feel that Cincinnati has a pretty strong bicyclist contingent... but with that said, I also think we should be doing a lot more to provide safe bicycle networks and parking facilities.

 

Portland is a city that is often thrown around as a poster child for a lot of things. But you know what...they simply do a lot of things right, and bicycling is one of those. You can request free bike racks, from the city, and even check out their standards if you so choose to install your own. Portland even has a master bike plan that has routes and parking facilities mapped out.

 

Now this has me asking myself...what could be done in Cincinnati to improve the bicycle situation here. Sure we have racks installed randomly, but Cincinnati's existing bicycle plan seems to be lacking. Furthermore I don't believe I've ever seen a covered bicycle parking facility in this city, or even a plan to install one. With Portland's bicycle parking options you can actually even request to have a facility installed that would provide on-street bike parking...taking up roughly 1.5 on-street parking spaces, and it would provide parking for 12 bikes.

 

All in all, it seems like something worthwhile for the city to pursue. You could reduce traffic congestion, air pollution, improve fitness levels, offer greater amounts of parking options and just make the city a more attractive place for those who choose to travel by bike. Given the recent progress of streetcars it would seem to be an attractive opportunity for the city to pursue.

 

Bicycling in Cincinnati:

MoBo Bicycle Co-op

Bike Trails in the Tri-State

Trail Yeah

Trek Cincinnati

Morning Glory Bike Ride

 

bike_oasis.jpg

Bike Oasis Covered Bicycle Parking Facility

www.streetsblog.org

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While that is very nice and should be implemented in the future, I think money should be spent first on getting a wealth of bike racks in the city. Improvements can be handled after a central core of racks are installed, such as shelters that can be constructed over existing racks, and so forth.

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While that is very nice and should be implemented in the future, I think money should be spent first on getting a wealth of bike racks in the city. Improvements can be handled after a central core of racks are installed, such as shelters that can be constructed over existing racks, and so forth.

 

According to the City of Cincinnati's website there are 200+ bike racks currently installed in the city.  This is pathetic when you compare this to Portland's 2,000+ (and rapidly growing) bike racks.

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What I think would work better is a good mix of bike racks (for short term users) and bike lockers for downtown workers.... not to mention places where you can shower and change clothes.

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True. Do you (or anyone) see them occupied much during the day?

 

It depends where you're at...Uptown area (UC, Medical Campus, Clifton, etc) = yes...Downtown = somewhat.  It really just varies on a neighborhood by neighborhood basis.

 

What I think would work better is a good mix of bike racks (for short term users) and bike lockers for downtown workers.... not to mention places where you can shower and change clothes.

 

Yeah, the bike lockers seem like an especially good idea.  Not only do they protect your bike from the elements, but they also provide an added security bonus.  You feel much more comfortable leaving your bike in one of these lockers than you do when you simply chain it to something.  They also do not take up all that much space.

 

Here are a couple examples...some are just downright hideous, but when done tastefully they can actually look quite nice.

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Well, I have the standard "u-lock" for my bike and they can only be removed with a plasma torch. The locks are insured so that if your bike _is_ stolen with the lock in use, the company will fund a full replacement.

 

They make a "u-lock" for a moped which is a cheap $40. Secure it to your wheel and to a post.

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Well, I have the standard "u-lock" for my bike and they can only be removed with a plasma torch. The locks are insured so that if your bike _is_ stolen with the lock in use, the company will fund a full replacement.

 

This is true...but a bird could still sh!t on it, or a drunk college kid could puke on it, or someone could take pieces of it off for scraps.

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^^ Oh my, thank you for sharing that! I'm very jealous right now.

 

2way_%20street1bikelane.jpg

 

That is some beautiful brick streets. Great use of striping. It reminds me of what they did to the Arena District in Columbus.

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Well, I have the standard "u-lock" for my bike and they can only be removed with a plasma torch. The locks are insured so that if your bike _is_ stolen with the lock in use, the company will fund a full replacement.

 

They make a "u-lock" for a moped which is a cheap $40. Secure it to your wheel and to a post.

 

you can split them open with a hydrolic jack

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Well, I have the standard "u-lock" for my bike and they can only be removed with a plasma torch. The locks are insured so that if your bike _is_ stolen with the lock in use, the company will fund a full replacement.

 

This is true...but a bird could still sh!t on it, or a drunk college kid could puke on it, or someone could take pieces of it off for scraps.

 

I know of a case where a thief hacksawed through a sign post to steal a bike that was locked to it with an unbreakable lock. I've heard of the same thing with parking meter posts and small trees. In a downtown area you'd think people would take notice and challenge the thief, but they don't. The don't want to get involved, and it's not their bike.

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Those numbers don't surprise me at all- they're leaving bikes out on the street, 24/7, for all to use.  I would expect significant, continued loss of bikes from the system.  It sounds bad, but it is really a sort of operating cost.  One to be minimized of course, but it will probably always be significant none the less.  I would imagine those funding the program would understand that as well.

 

It would be cool to see something like this in Cleveland.

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I recently got a new bike, a Specialized Globe, which is designed and marketed as a commuter bike.  I paid $520 for it, a similar Specialized model with front shocks sells for $100 more. 

 

P1300340.jpg

 

 

It replaces my mountain bike I bought in 2002 which was borrowed but never returned by the shady friend of a shady roommate.  I rode over 100 miles a week for years when I had no car and even though I have since bought a car I prefer biking anytime, anywhere. 

 

I really like this new bike.  I was initially skeptical of a dedicated commuter bike, but was quickly sold when I rode it.  The frame is very lightweight and the components are excellent.  Accelleration and climbing hills is much easier on this lighter bike.  It's sold stock with narrow road tires which seem rugged enough.  For theft prevention it is sold with no quick release on either the front tire or seat post.     

 

This bike is sold stock with flat pedals, I am definitely going to get clips soon.  The lack of clips makes curb jumping difficult.  This along with the lack of shocks prevents aggressive riding.  I find the forward seating position to be unstable for fast coasting downhill, I have to lift up and back of the seat to stay in control at high speed.  I anticipate that this instability will be reduced or eliminated with toe clips.  I've had toe clips since I was 12, in a lot of common situations (fast braking, etc.) I find myself about to fall off the thing since I forget I don't have them.       

 

The bike was not comfortable in the store when I sat on it but I was immediately sold when I took it for a spin around the parking lot.  With the exception of the pedals, all the stock components are excellent on this bike so I consider it a good buy.   

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Good choice! It will be a lot easier on the road than a typical road bike, given that the tire profile is slightly larger and the wheels a little more heavy. You will so desire clips -- it makes pedaling, especially on grades, a lot easier, and gives you a greater workout. I can't tell what seat you have on there, but you may consider a lightweight component seat that won't absorb water -- it's a little pricey, but it saves weight and won't hold liquid.

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nice choice.  you might want to add some fenders too.  a true commuter must ride home in all weather.  or in the case of cleveland...most weather.  blizzard biking is not recommended.  the pedals are likely cheap wellgo jobbers that they put on all new bikes, even the super expensive ones.  it is an assumed upgrade.  and if you don't own one already...buy a helmet!  cars are made of metal, you are not.

 

oh, and have fun.  there is nothing like the feeling of pedaling home after a long day at work.   

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Luckily where I work I can bring the bike inside so the wet seat is not so much of an issue, although I went 4 years without a car so I rode plenty of times in the rain.  Everyone hates getting caught in summer thunderstorms while on paved trails, I've never understood why they can't build little shelters every mile or two.  One time I hung out in the cab of an abandoned Ford pickup waiting for the rain to end. 

 

This year I want to ride between Cincinnati and Columbus at least once.  Putting the bike on the front of the Fields-Ertel express bus gets you about 22 miles in the right direction (and avoids most of the major hills to be encounted on the route), after which it's about a 90 mile flat ride on U.S. 22 with plenty of towns to take breaks and get food and drinks.  Easily doable in 8 hours.   

 

I'm also thinking about taking it on Amtrak, although I haven't been able to find whether The Cardinal still allows roll-on biking.  The whole boxing matter is a bunch of rubbish, it turns taking the bike into a big hassle.  If not for the boxing, I could simply coast down to the train station at 2am, roll it on, and roll off in Washington, DC and/or New York.  With the boxing nonsense you have to literally strap the box to your back while riding to the station, partially disassemble the bike in the station, then reassemble it at the destination while keeping the box intact for the return trip.  Now when you do get home you can just throw out the box and ride home, but still, what a hassle.  Of the four trips to and from the stations, only one trip is unencumbered by the box.     

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Cin Weekly in Cincinnati just ran a feature on alternative commutes...the writer biked one day and complained about the Delta Ave. "hill", saying she had to get off and walk.  It's about a 3% grade for one mile, totally weak compared to any of the city's real hills or the monsters across the river in Kentucky.  I haven't walked my bike up a hill since I was about 7.  I grew up in a hilly neighborhood where you were heckled if you walked your bike up hills or showed any strain while climbing them so at an early age you learned to keep a cool face.  I remember as a kid when we were riding in packs the show-offs would loop back down under younger kids riding up the same hill just to pass them two times.       

 

I refute the argument that Cincinnati is a bad biking town...it's just the opposite.  And since people here hate bikes and there are hardly any bike lanes, you don't ride with any expectation that people notice you, meaning you ride more defensively.  In a lot of towns I've found the bike lanes to be more dangerous than simply riding in traffic since you run such a risk of being doored by parked cars.  And people really get made if your ride in traffic instead of the bike lanes where they exist.     

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Commuting by bike in Cincinnati shifts into gear

http://www.soapboxmedia.com/features/27bikeadvocacy.aspx

 

Bicycle commuting isn’t inherently something you think about in hilly Cincinnati, but the topic got a huge awareness boost recently when the city’s Park Board announced a bicycle center as part of its new Riverfront Park. It would allow for secure parking, showers, clothes-changing and storage.

 

And now, the possibilities of commuting are being pursued with renewed enthusiasm on several fronts, helped by rising gas prices and increasing green consciousness.

 

Ideas are emerging or being reenergized about commuting routes – shared roadway lanes as well as dedicated trails – along rivers in Ohio and Northern Kentucky, down relatively flat city parkways, even through the woods of Ault Park to an existing trail along Red Bank Expressway.

 

There are also new ideas for programs in support of commuting – putting secure bike storage in office buildings and city parking garages; getting employers to pay a mileage reimbursement to commuting cyclists.

 

This comes at a time when a count by Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments of bicyclists during peak commuting hours – at two locations on single day in May – showed a marked increase from 2007. There were 40% more in O’Bryonville and a 15% increase at Pete Rose Way downtown. (A third count, in Clifton, was at an intersection not surveyed in 2007.) “We’re observing a lot more people cycling,” says Don Burrell, OKI’s bicycle/pedestrian coordinator.

 

Some of the new ideas are “blue sky” stuff, true. But until very recently so was the idea of a downtown bike center for commuters (and recreational users) in Cincinnati.

 

But the Park Board is now planning to break ground at 10 a.m. on Sept. 29th for the first phase of its ambitious Riverfront Park, the 40-acre “front yard” of the city being built in tandem with The Banks. And the bike center will be part of it, tucked into space under and near the Walnut Street Fountain and Grand Stairway and the East Event Lawn & Stage. It is tentatively scheduled for 2010 completion. (Riverfront Park, itself, will have a dedicated bike trail running its length and connecting to an in-the-works Ohio River Trail.)

 

“Our goal is to be one of the first in the area to have a bike center, because there are a lot of people who ride bikes to work,” says Marijane Klug, manager, financial services, for the Cincinnati Park Board.

 

The decision to build it resulted from trips that Klug, Director of Parks Willie F. Carden Jr., and Steven Schuckman, superintendent of planning & design, took in 2006 to Manhattan’s new shoreline bike trails and Chicago’s Millennium Park. In Chicago, they were delighted to see the park’s Bike Station, built to encourage commuting to downtown from along the Lake Michigan shore. The heated indoor center has 300 bike parking spaces plus lockers, showers, a snack bar, repair shop and rental area.

 

“That’s when we said we have to build a bike center,” Schuckman says.

 

Actually, many other cities want or have bike stations, too. Washington, D.C. plans to open a 150-bike facility by spring next year at its Union Station commuter hub. Denver has one for 150 bikes, plus showers and storage, near a trail connecting downtown with suburbs. And a Long Beach company called Bikestation has facilities in five California cities and Seattle.

 

Cincinnati’s bike center, as it is now envisioned, will have two desks – one for general information about the park, the other for rentals of bikes and Segways. (Borrowing an idea from Louisville, the Park Board may also put bike-rental racks in various parks, accessible by swiping credit cards, so visitors can get around without driving.

 

Two subsequent rooms would have half-size lockers, toilets, three shower stalls each, and storage space for bikes. This could change, as the Park Board gauges demand. Regular commuters will be able to buy memberships to use the center. The Park Board already is planning a second, much-larger bike center by the Vine Street Fountain and Grand Stairway, planned for a later phase of Riverfront Park development.

 

If the enthusiasm of one bike commuter is any indication, demand will be keen. “I think it will be huge,” says Rob Currens, 52, who rides from near Ault Park to his job at Longworth Hall, just west of the Brent Spence Bridge near downtown. He travels mostly along relatively Eastern Avenue/Riverside Drive, along the river, and passes near the future site of the bike center. “That’s the kind of thing that makes a world-class city – having progressive ideas about bicycling as a viable form of commuting,” he says.

 

While various problems still are being thrashed out with the unbuilt portions of the projected 16-mile Ohio River Trail, from Theodore M. Berry International Friendship Park east along Eastern Avenue/Riverside Drive, some real progress is being made further out.

 

The city is set to accept bids for a ½-mile connector from the five-mile Lunken Playfield Loop Trail to Kellogg Avenue at Carrel Street in Columbia-Tusculum, where it eventually will connect with the Ohio River Trail. Construction will start after some sewer-line work, says Jim Coppock, of Cincinnati Transportation and Engineering Department’s Bicycle Transportation Program.

 

The city also has earmarked $2.2 million to design for bikes a bridge over the Little Miami River at Kellogg Avenue to take bikes from Lunken to the future southern terminus of the Little Miami Trail being planned by Hamilton County Parks District.

 

Meanwhile, Anderson Township has received funding to build a 3.1-mile extension of the well-used Little Miami Trail from its current Newtown terminus south to Clough Pike. It plans to start construction in 2012.

 

Anderson also will start construction next year on a 1½-mile spur of the Ohio River Trail – which is ultimately planned to connect Cincinnati with New Richmond – along Kellogg between Sutton and Five Mile roads.

 

Linking the Little Miami, Lunken and Ohio River trails is believed crucial for cycling’s future in Cincinnati, which is why various agencies are trying so hard to get it done.

 

“We have 100 people right now who commute by bike from Anderson Township to the city,” says Tom Caruso, the township’s trails coordinator, who says they mostly ride on streets along the river. “We anticipate when all this is built as an off-road corridor, a lot more people will commute.

 

“And we also believe people will come here to ride the bicycle corridor. So there’s a lot of economic benefit, environmental benefit and just physical well-being at stake in this.”

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Lack of vision, planning and investment have made Cincinnati a 'bike unfriendly' city

http://citybeat.com/gyrobase/Content?oid=oid%3A145988

 

It's difficult to ride a bicycle in Cincinnati, and not just because it's hilly and the weather sucks and our neighborhoods sprawl 30 miles away into another counties and states.

 

It's not because there are few bike racks and even fewer bike lanes. It's not because each neighborhood presents its own set of problems for planners and engineers or the fact that Cincinnati hasn't had a planning department since 2002.

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About the Cincy article, it looks a bit too negative. A lot of the same could be said for Columbus, but going from urban neighborhood to neighborhood is quite easy particularly on side streets. Looking at google maps, Cincinnati seems to have the same deal and the roads that are bad for bikes are those going over highways or a river, since you basically have to go on a major road. Our downtowns are both isolated by highways with few options that beginners would want to take. But much like I said earlier, going between different neighborhoods isn't a challenge and getting around within an urban neighborhood is very easy.

 

If you're serious about it, you can easily fit it into your routine, but the article would rather bitch about what's not there while not mentioning any of the positives which will just scare off more people from cycling. Corryville is an urban neighborhood and as such bike-lanes are out of place there. I can't believe that a senior engineer and an "avid cyclist" would be implementing wider lanes. Wider lanes = cars passing within a foot. I've learned too many times from personal experience that on wide roads cars will not use that extra room to pass safely, you have to be right in front of them. He mentioned that forcing cars to change lanes is risky, but there's always a risk since you're not encased in thousands of pounds of steel. Why you'd want cars to pass in the same lane and turn right in front of you at intersections is beyond me. If you ride as if there is a bike lane this will happen to you too, which is why I take the lane. And getting a mirror is a good idea.

 

From Orlando Bike Commuter Blog

turningcars.jpg

 

I also blogged on curb-huggers and how bike-lanes don't belong in an urban environment.

 

Here's my pic from DC.

 

2862822801_4a0c021e9a.jpg?v=0

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About the Cincy article, it looks a bit too negative. A lot of the same could be said for Columbus, but going from urban neighborhood to neighborhood is quite easy particularly on side streets. Looking at google maps, Cincinnati seems to have the same deal and the roads that are bad for bikes are those going over highways or a river, since you basically have to go on a major road. Our downtowns are both isolated by highways with few options that beginners would want to take. But much like I said earlier, going between different neighborhoods isn't a challenge and getting around within an urban neighborhood is very easy.

 

If you're serious about it, you can easily fit it into your routine, but the article would rather bitch about what's not there while not mentioning any of the positives which will just scare off more people from cycling. Corryville is an urban neighborhood and as such bike-lanes are out of place there. I can't believe that a senior engineer and an "avid cyclist" would be implementing wider lanes. Wider lanes = cars passing within a foot. I've learned too many times from personal experience that on wide roads cars will not use that extra room to pass safely, you have to be right in front of them. He mentioned that forcing cars to change lanes is risky, but there's always a risk since you're not encased in thousands of pounds of steel. Why you'd want cars to pass in the same lane and turn right in front of you at intersections is beyond me. If you ride as if there is a bike lane this will happen to you too, which is why I take the lane. And getting a mirror is a good idea.

 

I'd say that it's your response that's negative and biased.  I just rode today,as I mentioned, and I did what I could to stay to the very right of the right lane (when there was more than one lane), or I just rode the shoulder line.  Cars and trucks either went around me or used the other side of the lane to get around.  Riding around Corryville, Walnut Hills, Clifton, Northside...it's all the same.  Sure, I've run into a few individuals who will honk, but it's really seldom.  I think that if you're showing that you're willing to share the road just as much as you expect them, things tend to work out.

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One more thing.  Are you advocating more for designated lanes rather than bike-exclusive lanes?  They most certainly have them in Chicago and Bloomington, to name a couple.

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Cincinnati needs those bike lifts on steep hills that they have in Norway. Here's an award for the steepest bike ride in San Fran with a grade of 38%, I get nervous just thinking about it. Looking at 127 in downtown Mt Healthy I would take the lane without hesitation. You may feel safer along the curb, but that's a false sense of security since riding on the curb opens the door various dangers that don't exist when riding in the middle of the lane, ie acting like a car. No ifs, ands, or buts. I'm having trouble seeing exactly where on 127 you start, but from the park northbound it looks like there are side streets which I would take over a main road whenever possible.

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I heard some talk that they wanted to put one of those lift elevators on Sycamore St., which is a serious hill with a grade around 15% and a lift of 200+ feet.  If I'm on a short ride, I can haul up the whole thing in a middle gear.  Unfortunately the top isn't the top and you're stuck still climbing for another quarter mile at a milder grade. 

 

Pittsburgh actually has the steepest hill in the US, with a 37% grade for one block.    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canton_Ave

 

I think I read the steepest street in Cincinnati is about 19% for one or two blocks, but there are definitely steeper and higher climbs across the river in Kentucky.     

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Cincinnati needs those bike lifts on steep hills that they have in Norway. Here's an award for the steepest bike ride in San Fran with a grade of 38%, I get nervous just thinking about it. Looking at 127 in downtown Mt Healthy I would take the lane without hesitation. You may feel safer along the curb, but that's a false sense of security since riding on the curb opens the door various dangers that don't exist when riding in the middle of the lane, ie acting like a car. No ifs, ands, or buts. I'm having trouble seeing exactly where on 127 you start, but from the park northbound it looks like there are side streets which I would take over a main road whenever possible.

 

What I didn't include earlier is that I take the sidewalks through Fairfield, until I get past 275.  Then I take the lane until about NCH.  Mostly I just want to avoid the crazy people getting on and off Cross County.  I rejoin the road before I hit Mt. Airy.

 

My route is at the city and county buildings in Hamilton, to the bike trail, down to Joe Nuxhall Dr.  Then crossing over to Pleasant Ave (US 127) to Clifton on Ludlow.

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If I remember correctly, a preliminary plan called for the paths to connect to the rail trails to the east?

 

Plan ties paths for walking, bicycling

Proposal for West Chester Township

By Amber Ellis, Cincinnati Enquirer, October 16, 2008

 

WEST CHESTER TWP. - A plan is in the works to create new paths and link existing ones for pedestrians and cyclists.

 

The West Chester Connections Plan, which was presented to the public Tuesday night, is a long-term plan that specifies several non-vehicle routes throughout the township.

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Cycling advocates push for better facilities, planning

http://www.soapboxmedia.com/devnews/qcbhearing1028.aspx

 

One-hundred twenty-five cycling advocates attended a meeting of Cincinnati City Council’s Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee last week to discuss how to bring better bicycle facilities to the city and the city's need to update its 32-year-old bicycle plan.

 

Queen City Bike, a collaboration of several local pro-bicycling organizations, led several group rides to City Hall and supplied many of the hearing's 31 speakers.

 

"From the overall perspective of Queen City Bike, we're still working on a formal mission statement, but we basically want greater access to walking, bicycling and mass transit in the region; a reduction in bicycle crashes; and a metro that recognizes bicycling and other non-motorized means as a healthy way to get around," Dan Korman says.

 

Much of the discussion concerned the redesign of Interstate 75 and how it can better accommodate multiple modes of transportation.

 

"We believe the I-75/Hopple St interchange is an example of how Complete Streets legislation is too often denigrated," Joseph Schuchter says.  "We're tired of bike pedestrian infrastructure being an opt-in.  We want plans for I-75, and all public projects for that matter, to include bike and pedestrian infrastructure.  A fight should not be part of the protocol."

 

Queen City Bike members agree unanimously that Cincinnati’s bicycle planning is well behind that of competitive cities.

 

"It's embarrassing that Cincinnati's bicycle plan is 30-years-old and that little has been done to make bicycling a priority in transportation projects," Korman says.

 

"We're playing catch up, and although alternative transportation is being recognized, I’m still unable to say that we're moving at a pace I’d like to see," Schuchter says.  "Until there is a commitment to update our bicycle plan, merge SORTA and TANK into a seamless and truly Metropolitan system, and stop building highways and adding lanes, the synergies of multiple modes of alternative transportation will not be realized."

 

Subcommittee chair Roxanne Qualls has said that input received at the public hearings will be considered by highway designers and planners.

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Group wants more bike-friendly city

http://news.cincinnati.com/article/20090112/NEWS01/301120081/1055/NEWS

 

A committee of local leaders and bicycle advocates has begun working to steer the Cincinnati region onto the national map for bicycle-friendly communities.

 

No Ohio city is on the bicycle-friendly communities list of the League of American Cyclists, a respected bicycle advocacy group based in Washington, D.C., that was founded in 1880 as the League of Wheelmen.

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