Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest seicer

A dying medium: newspapers

Recommended Posts

In Baltimore, No One Left to Press the Police

By David Simon, Washington Post, March 1, 2009

 

BALTIMORE In the halcyon days when American newspapers were feared rather than pitied, I had the pleasure of reporting on crime in the prodigiously criminal environs of Baltimore. The city was a wonderland of chaos, dirt and miscalculation, and loyal adversaries were many. Among them, I could count police commanders who felt it was their duty to demonstrate that crime never occurred in their precincts, desk sergeants who believed that they had a right to arrest and detain citizens without reporting it and, of course, homicide detectives and patrolmen who, when it suited them, argued convincingly that to provide the basic details of any incident might lead to the escape of some heinous felon. Everyone had very good reasons for why nearly every fact about a crime should go unreported.

 

Click on link for article.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My initial reply:

 

Truly sad.

 

Some can state that the death of newspapers is the fault of the Internet and its associated blogs and media, and who can fault the millions of daily readers of online aggregate news sources, CNN.com, and so forth that provide free information available at our fingertips? There is no cost to find a wealth of news, some of it more reliable than others, that can provide multiple viewpoints and opinions and engage the reader in so many different ways. No longer do readers wait for a day or two to perhaps have their chance at fame in the "Letters to the Editor" section, highly dependent, of course, on the editor's point-of-view. Comment away on the wholly unrestricted commenting sections devoted to each news article, where moderation is all but non-existent.

 

But where is the reliability and the in-depth coverage?

 

The Herald-Leader (Lexington, Ky.) just recently broke news that the local Bluegrass Airport was engaging in disparaging activities. Charging items such as Nintendo Wii's and prostitutes to the corporate account. Dining out at expensive restaurants in other locales. Buying lavish items for personal pleasure and use. The list goes on. As the Herald-Leader continued to break the stories, the state became involved and the matter has led to the resignation of the entire board and president. Criminal investigations are just now starting.

 

The Herald-Leader took the credit for this. After months upon months of research and digging through records made public, they had what they needed. But where was the new media in this? They reported on the same matter after the Herald-Leader broke the story, linking to various news articles that either supported the same story or was adjusted to fit a particular point-of-view. No critical commentary, no in-depth coverage, no investigative reporting. Nothing more than an aggregate of something else that someone else more thoroughly covered and investigated.

 

It is very rare find to stumble across a blog that will do the same in-depth investigations of that a major newspaper. They simply don't have the resources, time or money to compete. Their impact is also far smaller; a fraction of those that read a newspaper will stumble upon one particular blog amassed in a drawer of millions.

 

What about television networks? Outside of your local television stations that may report on a matter of interest, they simply do not have the time or resources to persue... say, criminal topics that the example provided. Time is money, unfortunately.

 

Many news-oriented blogs depend on newspapers or other reliable sources of media for their daily coverage. Many are passive-blogs, their writers failing to do any original research of their own or failing to spend the money and time to do any real investigative work. Instead, we try to counter with our own point-of-view, our own summary of what really happened, when in reality, we would be clueless without the aid of a reliable source.

 

I'm sad to see the newspaper medium slowly fade away. Without a pillar of investigative reporting, you'll see less reporters keep the heat on the local police. You'll see less in-depth or breaking coverage of a particular event. And there will be a loss of true community news that a newspaper (thus far) can only provide in terms of quality and quantity.

 

Sorry for the long post, but it was a post that I had long needed to type but had no outlet for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone who has tried to get a job at a newspaper (many papers are adding web video), I've seen this up close and personal. Papers are making their staffs work harder for less pay and/or benefits. People are being laid off in mass. The competition of college grads in this field is fierce. The news industry may be America's must brutal industry, second to possibly only the auto industry right now.

 

Keep in mind when your bottom line is determined by ad revenue, and the economy is in the crapper like this, you can't sell many ads. And that's on top of a declining readership base.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

printed media has slowly changed with the lifestyles of it's readers.

 

  • How many of you under 30 sit a home and read the paper while having breakfast?
  • How many of you under 35 have two or more magazine subscriptions?
     

 

In the age of the internet, PDAs & iPods as well as video games, lifestyles are different.  People are on the go, they want to be able to download their own content and read it at their leisure, not carry around a newspaper.

 

However, premium content and/or archived information is rarely free at most newspapers/magazines/internet sites. 

 

It's never the same and people no longer have to buy a book.  You can get it on a reader or download it have just listen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually subscribe or read to at least 10 magazines a month -- Kentucky, Southern West Virginia, West Virginia, Greenbrier Quarterly (my favorite), Huntington Quarterly, Charleston Monthly, Cincinnati, Blue Ridge Country, etc. They are engaging and full of content that I'd unlikely find anywhere else, and are well staffed and produced.

 

Magazines have not been hit nearly as hard, but it is dependent on the customer and the aim. For magazines like Time, Newsweek and so forth, they are becoming fast irrelevant, obsoleted by the new media and blogs that can effectively regurgitate the news just as well, sans some of the fancier graphics and more elaborate commentary. In fact, it is either U.S. News or Newsweekly that is reinventing itself as more of a opinion-oriented magazine to kick up some fresh vibe in an otherwise declining part of the magazine (and newspaper) industry.

 

But if it pertains to a locale or a region, sales are either flat or up. They offer diverse, dynamic content that you can't find anywhere else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually subscribe or read to at least 10 magazines a month -- Kentucky, Southern West Virginia, West Virginia, Greenbrier Quarterly (my favorite), Huntington Quarterly, Charleston Monthly, Cincinnati, Blue Ridge Country, etc. They are engaging and full of content that I'd unlikely find anywhere else, and are well staffed and produced.

 

Magazines have not been hit nearly as hard, but it is dependent on the customer and the aim. For magazines like Time, Newsweek and so forth, they are becoming fast irrelevant, obsoleted by the new media and blogs that can effectively regurgitate the news just as well, sans some of the fancier graphics and more elaborate commentary. In fact, it is either U.S. News or Newsweekly that is reinventing itself as more of a opinion-oriented magazine to kick up some fresh vibe in an otherwise declining part of the magazine (and newspaper) industry.

 

But if it pertains to a locale or a region, sales are either flat or up. They offer diverse, dynamic content that you can't find anywhere else.

 

You're inaccurate in that.  Those "old school" magazines are having a difficult time attracting readers your age[ 20-25].  Our magazines are multi-platform and have more distribution points. TIME, SI & the Fortune magazine are (cnn, headline news or (local content) like NY1) and can be access via AOL or have direct forum/opinion input via TWC.  IN addition lots of content is shared between People, Essence, EW, TIME via their own websites and CNN & TMZ.  Which all have varied target audiences.  TIME magazine is the fifth most recognized brand in the world and the most trusted name in printed news.  It's an american Icon.  Special interest and boutique magazines (i.e. mens vogue  :x ) along with Books are taking a much harder hit.

 

US News is garbage and has been hemorrhaging for years.  Newsweek has a partnership with NBC which helps them, but their editorial content and management is lacking.

 

Magazine must learn to work in a new media world.  But getting some to put down a hard copy magazine or getting some to buy a hard copy magazine is difficult, when they have a PDA/mobile device or ipod in one hand. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see the medium changing (distribution of pulp), but don't be surprised if periodicals make a comeback with the advent of electronic reading devices. Amazon is doing some pretty amazing things with electronic book publishing (see the Kindle technology) and has just opened up it's e-book technology to outside developers (you can buy a book on the iPhone now).

 

It's only a matter of time before this trickles down to the newspaper / magazine industry. I don't want to lug around a bunch of magazines, and newspapers, but if I can download them directly to a portable device, that's visually satisfying to read, then I'll do it. And I'll pay for the service. Publisher's win with significantly reduced distribution costs, and I win by getting (hopefully) a well published periodical, with quality content, and increased interactivity and improved convenience.

 

True journalists / reporters are an important part of a free society. I'm hoping that we're in a transitional phase and that ultimately we can get back to the "paper" providing that content again, just in a different way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see the medium changing (distribution of pulp), but don't be surprised if periodicals make a comeback with the advent of electronic reading devices. Amazon is doing some pretty amazing things with electronic book publishing (see the Kindle technology) and has just opened up it's e-book technology to outside developers (you can buy a book on the iPhone now).

 

It's only a matter of time before this trickles down to the newspaper / magazine industry. I don't want to lug around a bunch of magazines, and newspapers, but if I can download them directly to a portable device, that's visually satisfying to read, then I'll do it. And I'll pay for the service. Publisher's win with significantly reduced distribution costs, and I win by getting (hopefully) a well published periodical, with quality content, and increased interactivity and improved convenience.

 

True journalists / reporters are an important part of a free society. I'm hoping that we're in a transitional phase and that ultimately we can get back to the "paper" providing that content again, just in a different way.

 

And the iPod folks just released a app for the kindle, get it while it's free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am truly over the hill now.  I cannot see the appeal in the slightest of a kindle or something similar. I like to look at magazines and books, I don't want to read them on a tiny electronic screen. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am truly over the hill now.  I cannot see the appeal in the slightest of a kindle or something similar. I like to look at magazines and books, I don't want to read them on a tiny electronic screen. 

thats the difference between us and the whippersnappers!

 

They want everything in the palm of their hands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot see the appeal in the slightest of a kindle or something similar. I like to look at magazines and books, I don't want to read them on a tiny electronic screen.

 

I agree.  There is something about flipping through pages.  My husband and I have about four magazine subscriptions total.

 

Another reason I would be hesitant about buying a kindle is that I would feel locked into a sort of "contract."  I don't buy all my books from Amazon, and with a Kindle, I would be locked into Amazon.  I still like walking into a bookstore and leaving with what I want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read a micropaper on the subway every morning, but if it wasn't free, I would just wait until I got to work and read their website.

 

To its credit, I still read Cleveland.com everyday for local Cleveland news.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to subscribe to so many magazines it was getting so I couldn't keep up with them.  Now I've had to drop some of them because I am literally too old for their targeted readership.  Stuff like Jane and Marie Claire, it's like another world to me.  If I wore big, thick, colored knee socks and strappy sandals and 4 different colors of clothes on top of it to work, they would think it was time for me to visit the looney bin, they are just too far removed from my real life for it to make any sense anymore.  All the articles are about how you can tell if a guy likes you or what to do with your roommate problem and shit like that, I'm just too old for it.  There are very few decent mags for women my age that aren't full of crafty, annoying, stay-at-home-mom junk that I will never be interested in like scrapbooking or decorating your kid's high chair to look like a turkey at Thanksgiving time, it's just claptrap.  Hence, fewer subscriptions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, I'm 23 and look forward to my magazines in print! I can't stand kindles or other electronic devices for reading.

 

Me too. I prefer just being able to take it around with me anywhere and not cry a river if I lose it. I'm old-school. I like the magazine and newspaper websites, but I do most of my reading the old-fashioned way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will never be interested in like scrapbooking or decorating your kid's high chair to look like a turkey at Thanksgiving time, it's just claptrap.  Hence, fewer subscriptions.

 

Just wait until your child is the only one without a turkey high chair at thanksgiving, and all the other play group mothers judge you. Oh, then you'll be wishing you had that issue of 'Mommy's weekly". You can't just macrame on a whim, you know. It takes planning.

 

I am truly over the hill now.  I cannot see the appeal in the slightest of a kindle or something similar. I like to look at magazines and books, I don't want to read them on a tiny electronic screen. 

thats the difference between us and the whippersnappers!

 

They want everything in the palm of their hands.

 

Bah, first of all, I'm pretty sure I'm older than RnR (not MTS...NOBODY's older than MTS  :wink:)

 

Secondly, the kindle's screen is big, and they've come up with a screen / font that reads very comfortably like a book. And at just under $400, it's a steal!

 

KindleKing_270x267.jpg

 

Just look at how happy this woman is!

 

say-hello-450px._V251249381_.jpg

 

I don't know when I turned into a shill for Amazon, but hey, I thought the technology was cool. Besides, if Star Trek TNG is any indication, we'll soon be reading all of our materials in hand held 'readers'....that, and drinking out of impractical square glasses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will never be interested in like scrapbooking or decorating your kid's high chair to look like a turkey at Thanksgiving time, it's just claptrap.  Hence, fewer subscriptions.

 

Just wait until your child is the only one without a turkey high chair at thanksgiving, and all the other play group mothers judge you. Oh, then you'll be wishing you had that issue of 'Mommy's weekly". You can't just macrame on a whim, you know. It takes planning.

 

I am truly over the hill now.  I cannot see the appeal in the slightest of a kindle or something similar. I like to look at magazines and books, I don't want to read them on a tiny electronic screen. 

thats the difference between us and the whippersnappers!

 

They want everything in the palm of their hands.

 

Bah, first of all, I'm pretty sure I'm older than RnR (not MTS...NOBODY's older than MTS  ;) )

 

Secondly, the kindle's screen is big, and they've come up with a screen / font that reads very comfortably like a book. And at just under $400, it's a steal!

 

KindleKing_270x267.jpg

 

Just look at how happy this woman is!

 

say-hello-450px._V251249381_.jpg

 

I don't know when I turned into a shill for Amazon, but hey, I thought the technology was cool. Besides, if Star Trek TNG is any indication, we'll soon be reading all of our materials in hand held 'readers'....that, and drinking out of impractical square glasses.

 

I'm 28½!  Thats my story and I'm sticking too it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here's a observation about magazines we have been talking about in our house lately.

 

my spouse subscribes to home stuff like elle decor, house beautiful, vogue, lucky, domino (which just went out of biz), & a few other popular magazines. she stacks them up afterward to go thru them again later. what's amazing is that looking down the pile they all went from thick to razorthin in just a few months. it's a nerve rattling weird sign of the tanking economy -- no ad revenue!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two of my favs have shrunk dramatically (Car and Driver and GQ). I also go big for the general interest/intellectual - Atlantic, Harper's, Mother Jones. One Catholic mag (America), an urban magazine (City Journal), a few academic history journals. I subscribe off and on to a few others depending on my mode and paycheck. I love sitting with a magazine or journal. It is so much more pleasant to read than online (though most of these I'd be happy to read on the Kindle). However, GQ and Car and Driver are too picture driven for those instruments right now.

I've subscribed to daily newspapers even when they aren't worth the money (I'm looking at you Newport News Daily News, the Cincinnati Post after 2003, Cincy Enquirer after 2005). I even subscribed to the Philly Inquirer when I lived there for two months. Oh yeah, I get WSJ in print form as well. I read the local newspaper in the morning with breakfast.

 

Maybe I'm just an addict. Subscribers anonymous. My name is dmerkow and I have a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bah, first of all, I'm pretty sure I'm older than RnR (not MTS...NOBODY's older than MTS  :wink:)

 

I'll have you know, I'm older than MTS. Older than you, too. Dang near older than the both of you put together, for that matter, so let's have some respect!

 

It doesn't seem that long ago that almost everyone in my neighborhood subscribed to at least one of Fort Wayne's two daily papers, but now I think I'm probably the only one on my block who gets a paper. If the day comes when I can't have my morning paper with my coffee, I don't know what I'll do. I've become so accustomed to it that it would be an awful adjustment to make.

 

I enjoy my Trains Magazine, Smithsonian, and National Geographic, too. If I doze off and drop them on the floor, no big deal. One of those newfangled electronic doo-dads might not take so well to that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sherman has a real good point about the difficulty of bloggers doing the kind of investigative work full-time reporters used to do, particularly if one has a full time job and is sort of freelancing, without the time to develope contacts.

 

I found this out doing research on campaign contributions.  The financial reports for local races are not online, and in Ohio the employer or industry doesnt have to be reported, so it takes an few hours at the board of elections to research their files to see who was contributing to who, and one has to be somewhat savvy as to who the names are and what they mean about patterns of influence.  A reporter has the time to do this research, a blogger not so much.

 

Although believe it or not I was actually contacted by a reporter who wanted to interview or source me on some industrial/economics stuff I blogged on.  I told him thanks, I appreciate the complement, but I am an amateur and not a legit source, and to contact academics at UD or WSU as professional sources.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I doze off and drop them on the floor, no big deal. One of those newfangled electronic doo-dads might not take so well to that.

 

I usually fall asleep reading a magazine or book and usually drop them on the floor as well.  It would be upsetting to wake up and realize that I had dropped a $400 device.  :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

They want everything in the palm of their hands.

If I doze off and drop them on the floor, no big deal. One of those newfangled electronic doo-dads might not take so well to that.

 

I usually fall asleep reading a magazine or book and usually drop them on the floor as well. It would be upsetting to wake up and realize that I had dropped a $400 device. :(

 

Completely agree.  I have to print electronic readings out I get from school.  It just doesn't feel right when you recline on the couch and have a clunky and noisy laptop.  The screen hurts my eyes after awhile too. 

 

Yeah I've tried, and YES, I have dropped the computer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other thing newspapers have that bloggers don't is lawyers and the presumption of bully pulpit that has the ability to shame public figures into more openness. Obviously, it isn't perfect put an amateur newsgatherer lacks that umbrella of institutional propriety.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other thing newspapers have that bloggers don't is lawyers and the presumption of bully pulpit that has the ability to shame public figures into more openness. Obviously, it isn't perfect put an amateur newsgatherer lacks that umbrella of institutional propriety.

 

That and deep pocket research groups and archives. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hardly ever look at magazines anymore.  I can't find the articles for the advertisements.

 

Printed or digital mags?

 

I was talking about print, but I think it applies to both to a degree.  I actually prefer reading print, too.  The fallout inserts and all the thick page ads that make it impossible to flip through a magazine and find an article easily have turned me off to magazines in a big way.  Just the same I won't revisit any site that features lots of pop ups or redirection.  I'm sure there's a science to determining the right balance of bringing in every possible drop of ad revenue and driving people away.  I must fall to the wrong side of the bell curve on that one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

They want everything in the palm of their hands.

If I doze off and drop them on the floor, no big deal. One of those newfangled electronic doo-dads might not take so well to that.

 

I usually fall asleep reading a magazine or book and usually drop them on the floor as well.  It would be upsetting to wake up and realize that I had dropped a $400 device.  :(

 

Completely agree.  I have to print electronic readings out I get from school.  It just doesn't feel right when you recline on the couch and have a clunky and noisy laptop.  The screen hurts my eyes after awhile too. 

 

Yeah I've tried, and YES, I have dropped the computer!

 

Mock me now, but you'll see...you'll all see. A kindle in every library and square glasses in every kitchen...that's my motto.

 

Personally, I actually do a lot of my newspaper reading (Crains, WSJ and NYT) through my cell phone. Two reasons...1) I'm usually out of the house before the paper gets delivered, and 2) I move around alot for my jobs, so it's just easier to read a couple articles while I'm waiting for a meeting, or in between projects.

 

If papers are scaling back to cut costs, I have to think that part of what's driving it is declining demand for local news coverage. What I'm guessing might happen is that you see more and more local papers disappear, and there's going to be a consolidation to a few national papers, or maybe 'super-regional' papers, that cover entire states, or sections of the US. You'll get some general coverage of local events from a couple local staffers, but content is driven from some centralized office which may or may not be in your city. Kind of like what's happened with radio in many markets.

 

What do you guys think of that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

They want everything in the palm of their hands.

If I doze off and drop them on the floor, no big deal. One of those newfangled electronic doo-dads might not take so well to that.

 

I usually fall asleep reading a magazine or book and usually drop them on the floor as well.  It would be upsetting to wake up and realize that I had dropped a $400 device.  :(

 

Completely agree.  I have to print electronic readings out I get from school.  It just doesn't feel right when you recline on the couch and have a clunky and noisy laptop.  The screen hurts my eyes after awhile too. 

 

Yeah I've tried, and YES, I have dropped the computer!

 

Mock me now, but you'll see...you'll all see. A kindle in every library and square glasses in every kitchen...that's my motto.

 

Personally, I actually do a lot of my newspaper reading (Crains, WSJ and NYT) through my cell phone. Two reasons...1) I'm usually out of the house before the paper gets delivered, and 2) I move around alot for my jobs, so it's just easier to read a couple articles while I'm waiting for a meeting, or in between projects.

 

If papers are scaling back to cut costs, I have to think that part of what's driving it is declining demand for local news coverage. What I'm guessing might happen is that you see more and more local papers disappear, and there's going to be a consolidation to a few national papers, or maybe 'super-regional' papers, that cover entire states, or sections of the US. You'll get some general coverage of local events from a couple local staffers, but content is driven from some centralized office which may or may not be in your city. Kind of like what's happened with radio in many markets.

 

What do you guys think of that?

 

I would disagree about the declining demand for local news coverage. I think if anything it's that the big city dailies are not able to provide the kind of "hyper-local" news and event info (to steal a recently coined term) and segmented local coverage that people seek. Ask yourself why you are reading urbanohio? One reason is the constant flow of information (that you just won't in the local newspaper) related to the relatively narrow local news vertical -- urban issues and development. There are websites for people to follow whatever local thing they are in to in greater detail than the daily paper can provide - the food and restaurant scene, entertainment, specific community websites, and on and on.

 

So I don't think it's declining demand for local news as much as rapidly changing consumer habits, especially in the younger demos, and the large news ops are having trouble adapting to the change, although they are trying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To follow on with redbrick, the problem is not declining demand for local news (in fact purely local papers are doing okay), but rather that catch all parts of the big dailies - that it where folks will just read the NYTimes or WashingtonPost instead of AP feed the local paper gives you. The other problem is that once a paper starts to cut back and does worse on local news then it becomes less worthwhile to subscribe and then it all snowballs. I wouldn't mind regional papers if they keep the investment in reporting, but otherwise, well that's just depressing.

 

The rise of Craigslist has been disastrous for the newspaper industry. Often 40 percent of revenue came from classified ads - Craig Newmark will spend some time in hell for this.

 

At the national level, I think the country would do fine with 5 or so truly national papers (we've got three right now - WSJ, NYT, USAToday, and the WashingtonPost is kinda of national but still pretty local).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 10 Major Newspapers That Will Either Fold or Go Digital Next

By 24/7 WALL ST. – 34 mins ago

Douglas A. McIntyre

 

Over the last few weeks, the newspaper industry has entered a new period of decline. The parent of the papers in Philadelphia declared bankruptcy as did the Journal Register chain. The Rocky Mountain News closed and the Seattle Post Intelligencer, owned by Hearst, will almost certainly close or only publish online. Hearst has said it will also close The San Francisco Chronicle if it cannot make massive cuts at the paper. The most recent rumor is that the company will fire half of the editorial staff. That action still may not be enough to make the property profitable.

 

 

List:

1. The Philadelphia Daily News.

 

2. The Minneapolis Star Tribune

 

3. The Miami Herald

 

4. The Detroit News

 

5. The Boston Globe

 

6. The San Francisco Chronicle

 

7. The Chicago Sun Times

 

8. NY Daily News

 

9. The Fort Worth Star Telegram

 

10. The Cleveland Plain Dealer

 

Click on link for article.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/time/20090309/us_time/08599188378500

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree with most of those. Zuckerman will go to the poorhouse before closing the Daily News. Boston does actually have a second newspaper - The Boston Herald (irony of ironies, it is the 'conservative' paper in town).

 

The Chronicle and Plain Dealer are the ones that economics point to collapse, but I wonder if they would be essentially closed down and then opened back up with a minimal staff and no debt. These are essentially monopolies and while Cleveland is down, it is still one of the largest metros in the country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd agree with most of those. Zuckerman will go to the poorhouse before closing the Daily News. Boston does actually have a second newspaper - The Boston Herald (irony of ironies, it is the 'conservative' paper in town).

 

The Chronicle and Plain Dealer are the ones that economics point to collapse, but I wonder if they would be essentially closed down and then opened back up with a minimal staff and no debt. These are essentially monopolies and while Cleveland is down, it is still one of the largest metros in the country.

 

The PD is not in as bad shape as some papers but it negative news has affected advertising badly.

 

I've said it before.  Clean house and start over.  Not an excuse, but I see the SF Chron, PDN, the Miami Herald to Close before the PD.

 

What you all don't know is that if a major Paper closes a TV station will follow behind shortly.  That was left out of the original story.  Not sure why, (I can't ask about editorial content) but I have a feeling that other media outlets will be spotted later.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...