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Cleveland: Detroit-Shoreway / Gordon Square Arts District: Development and News

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Sounds like a good reason to start a grassroots petition to do such a thing. Why wait for an elected official who should be thinking of this anyway to do it?

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I agree with the suggestions but lets be honest, the zoning ordinance in Detroit Shoreway is not holding up any new developments.  If a developer puts in the time to buy the property and a viable redevelopment plan is presented, the project will be approved.

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I think the point is that the default policy, for a developer who doesn't care to prepare a variance request, is to develop traditional stand-alone one- and two-family homes set back from the street, with side yards and front yards and back yards and dedicated space to parking. If someone wants to deviate from that formula, they have to make a concerted effort to make a case why.

 

While this might make sense in some neighborhoods, it seems puzzling for places with high demand and proximity to rail. And it seems outright stupefying that developers have to petition for variances to make their properties front the sidewalk or downsize parking downtown or in University Circle. In areas where the private market is dictating more dense development, default zoning should favor dense development. Let the developer who wants a setback or big yards or tons of garage parking be the ones that have to take the time to seek a variance.

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More housing proposal.........

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2012/crr05-29-2012.pdf

 

9:30

Ward 15

Calendar No. 12-79:

5709 Bridge Avenue

Matthew Zone

33 Notices

 

Case Development LLC appeals to construct a building with 6 townhomes proposed to be on consolidated parcels located in a B1 Two-Family District; not permitted by the limita-tions under Section 337.03 and first permitted in a Town Home RA District under Sec-tion 337.031; and contrary to Section 357.04 no front yard is proposed for units 1 through 6 where a front yard of 20 feet is required and under Section 357.15(a) residential build-ings in the same lot are required to be 40 feet apart; and contrary to Section 355.04, a maximum gross floor area of 4,760 square feet is proposed and one half the lot area equals 4,056 square feet; and the building height of 42’-5” exceeds the maximum height of 35’ that is allowed according to Section 352.02 in the Cleveland Codified Ordinances. (Filed 5-2-12)


"Fascism begins the moment a ruling class, fearing the people may use their political democracy to gain economic democracy, begins to destroy political democracy in order to retain its power of exploitation and special privilege." -- Tommy Douglas, Scottish-born Canadian Baptist minister and the seventh Premier of Saskatchewan

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I think that is the Waverly Station proposal we've been discussing, no?

 

Aha! Yes, it is... http://townhomescleveland.com/

 

But I thought they were building more than six housing units?


"Fascism begins the moment a ruling class, fearing the people may use their political democracy to gain economic democracy, begins to destroy political democracy in order to retain its power of exploitation and special privilege." -- Tommy Douglas, Scottish-born Canadian Baptist minister and the seventh Premier of Saskatchewan

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Might just be phase I.  Their web site shows a build-out close to 20 units.

 

That makes more sense.


"Fascism begins the moment a ruling class, fearing the people may use their political democracy to gain economic democracy, begins to destroy political democracy in order to retain its power of exploitation and special privilege." -- Tommy Douglas, Scottish-born Canadian Baptist minister and the seventh Premier of Saskatchewan

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by the way... and I don't want to take this any further off topic than necessary... but over and over and over again I see complaints against zoning. As someone who works with the Cleveland zoning code almost every day. I just want to say.... it is really not a very big deal. Is our zoning code ridiculous in many areas? Sure. But you either have zoning or you don't. Having zoning is just a way to keep a check and balance system on making sure you know what is happening and that bad stuff doesn't happen. And it is a pretty easy process. Submit your plans, they get reviewed. The city rejects for whatever reasons and they schedule your hearing. And if as noted above it is a worthwhile project... it passes. It is about a 2-3 week delay which in the overall timeline of developments (which are substantially longer than when people find out about them) its a really insignificant roadbump, and most always often accounted for from the start. Carry on. :)

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by the way... and I don't want to take this any further off topic than necessary... but over and over and over again I see complaints against zoning. As someone who works with the Cleveland zoning code almost every day. I just want to say.... it is really not a very big deal. Is our zoning code ridiculous in many areas? Sure. But you either have zoning or you don't. Having zoning is just a way to keep a check and balance system on making sure you know what is happening and that bad stuff doesn't happen. And it is a pretty easy process. Submit your plans, they get reviewed. The city rejects for whatever reasons and they schedule your hearing. And if as noted above it is a worthwhile project... it passes. It is about a 2-3 week delay which in the overall timeline of developments (which are substantially longer than when people find out about them) its a really insignificant roadbump, and most always often accounted for from the start. Carry on. :)

 

Form-based code.

 

Couldn't help myself

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by the way... and I don't want to take this any further off topic than necessary... but over and over and over again I see complaints against zoning. As someone who works with the Cleveland zoning code almost every day. I just want to say.... it is really not a very big deal. Is our zoning code ridiculous in many areas? Sure. But you either have zoning or you don't. Having zoning is just a way to keep a check and balance system on making sure you know what is happening and that bad stuff doesn't happen. And it is a pretty easy process. Submit your plans, they get reviewed. The city rejects for whatever reasons and they schedule your hearing. And if as noted above it is a worthwhile project... it passes. It is about a 2-3 week delay which in the overall timeline of developments (which are substantially longer than when people find out about them) its a really insignificant roadbump, and most always often accounted for from the start. Carry on. :)

 

We should continue this conversation in the zoning thread: http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,25222.msg558323.html#msg558323

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by the way... and I don't want to take this any further off topic than necessary... but over and over and over again I see complaints against zoning. As someone who works with the Cleveland zoning code almost every day. I just want to say.... it is really not a very big deal. Is our zoning code ridiculous in many areas? Sure. But you either have zoning or you don't. Having zoning is just a way to keep a check and balance system on making sure you know what is happening and that bad stuff doesn't happen. And it is a pretty easy process. Submit your plans, they get reviewed. The city rejects for whatever reasons and they schedule your hearing. And if as noted above it is a worthwhile project... it passes. It is about a 2-3 week delay which in the overall timeline of developments (which are substantially longer than when people find out about them) its a really insignificant roadbump, and most always often accounted for from the start. Carry on. :)

 

Don't disagree. But it's also not all that complicated to amend zoning to reflect changing priorities around how we encourage particular types of development. As we see more and more people seeking variances to make their developments more "urban", it seems like moving that 2-3 week delay onto developers who want more suburban stock, instead of creating a barrier (however small) for people like Ari Maron, might be worthwhile :)

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Ribbon-cutting caps building renovation in Cleveland's Detroit Shoreway neighborhood

 

 

CLEVELAND - There were dignitaries, speeches and a ribbon-cutting. The renovated building dated to the late 1920's and the event was much anticipated by everyone in the area.

 

No, this was not the Horseshoe Casino -- but Monday's grand re-opening of the historic Sylvia apartment building in Cleveland's Detroit Shoreway neighborhood.

 

Mayor Frank Jackson and community leaders dedicated and toured the $3 million, 18-unit apartment building project, and proclaimed it the "jewel" of Franklin Avenue.

 

http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/news/local_news/cleveland_metro/Ribbon-cutting-caps-building-renovation-in-Clevelands-Detroit-Shoreway-neighborhood#ixzz1vXTZMCaI

 

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^Do you consider the local CDC to be a slum landlord? The building was renovated using low-income tax credits. This was hashed out at some length upthread.

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Per this Crain's article the funding came from federal historic tax credit and the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP), not LIHTC (http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20111010/FREE/310109948), though I don't know how much that matters.  It's not clear from the coverage what level of affordability the units are set at, but most likely, given NSP requirements, they have to be affordable to housheolds making 50 percent of [metro] area median income, which is equal to something like $22-$31k, depending on family size.  All to say, unless I'm totally missing something (very possible) these are likely to be lower middle class, employed people, not the poorest of the poor.

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This is a fun update from DSCDO

 

Detroit Shoreway luring retailers by offering free rent for top plans

 

The Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization (DSCDO) recently got some ink in Crain's Cleveland Business for its recently launched business plan competition. The competition offers free rent in increments of three months, six months and a year to the winners, who will fill vacant storefronts in the Gordon Square Arts District.

 

"When people go shopping, they are looking to stop at more than one or two stores," Jeff Ramsey, executive director of DSCDO, told Crain's. "They want a selection of stores to visit. We're trying to expand the mix of businesses here."

 

For more information on the business plan competition, contact Nick Fedor, Director of Marketing and Economic Development, at nfedor@dscdo.or or 216/961-4242. 

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Cleveland-area planners to consider sending $27 million to West 73rd Street project

Published: Saturday, June 02, 2012, 5:45 AM

Tom Breckenridge, The Plain Dealer By Tom Breckenridge, The Plain Dealer

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio — The region's top planning body will vote on plowing $27 million into a new West Side link with the lakeshore.

 

The five-county agency could vote as soon as Friday to send federal money to the West 73rd Street underpass, long planned in the Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood.

 

An approval from the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency would be good news for city officials and neighborhood residents.

 

ODOT earned their scorn by announcing in January that $30 million for the project could be delayed until 2026, despite saying for years that funding was in place.

 

The project would extend West 73rd north as a tunnel under an active rail line. The street would then jog to the east and connect with an existing tunnel under the West Shoreway, leading to Edgewater Park.

 

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2012/06/post_25.html

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Waverly Station has begun to dig.  I'm going to email them to see if the garages in the front with the current set-up are set in stone.  I'm really interested in them, but that one thing is a deal breaker!

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I love this story!  Was reading about this guy a while back that had aspired to bring this production "home", but now he has bought an old industrial building in Gordon Square for this very cool production.  Its like a return of manufacturing on the neighborhood level.  Now if we could only make those parts here again.

 

Cleveland CycleWerks to move motorcycle production to Cleveland from China (video)

Published: Saturday, June 16, 2012, 12:00 PM    Updated: Saturday, June 16, 2012, 12:11 PM

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- It's just a dilapidated industrial site now, but Scott Colosimo sees what should be there by the end of the year - a high-tech factory pumping out Cleveland CycleWerks motorcycles by the thousands.

 

The floors will be painted concrete. The ceilings will be covered with enough lights to make the place glow. The walls? CycleWerks' chief executive Colosimo, 31, plans to leave the aged red bricks in place, a reminder that his new work space near the Gordon Square Arts District made industrial rubber for nearly a century.

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2012/06/cleveland_cyclewerks_to_move_m.html

 

 

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Cleveland's unique offer: $5K discount on new town home if you volunteer in the community

CLEVELAND - Developer Michael DeCesare and his wife Nancy have come up with a unique way to get new Cleveland home buyers to get involved in their communities.

 

DeCesare is calling the concept the "Shoreway Vision Program," giving buyers of his new town houses a $5,000 discount on the purchase price, if they give at least 40 volunteer hours to their community.

 

DeCesare made the offer available at his "Town Houses at Courtland" project on West 54th in Cleveland, and he's now extending the discount to his new "Waverly Station" project, at West 58th and Bridge Avenue.

 

"There's always been incentives to purchase," said DeCesare. "Nobody has ever heard of an incentive to purchase that requires you to give back time in your community."

 

The offer has sparked plenty of interest in the 22-unit Waverly Station project. Construction at the site has not yet started, but already, all but three units have been bought up in the project's first phase.

 

Read more: http://www.newsnet5.com/dpp/money/consumer/troubleshooter/clevelands-unique-offer-5k-discount-on-new-town-home-if-you-volunteer-in-the-community#ixzz1ywe96DDF

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^proposal looks great but that building's had more facelifts than Joan Rivers....  I hate to see another restaurant come in, spend thousands on renovations, and then not get the business to support it.  I think this is the 5th business at this location in 4 years...  Spice Kitchen/Roseangel/LaBoca/CheddarMacs/Snickers....

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Indeed they run their succesful catering business out of there.  I know the main guy there has quite the fan base as well, but I havent heard much about the restaurant thus far or how business is going on that end. 

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A bit of cross-posting from Transportation -- but I think this applies to both

 

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2012/06/post_34.html

 

 

Cleveland's pursuit of West 73rd underpass could delay other road projects

 

.....

 

NOACA said Friday that pots of federal cash for dozens of road and bridge projects can bear a $27 million hit for the West 73rd project, only if Cleveland puts off millions of dollars of improvements on six projects until at least 2016.

 

That includes $5.7 million for work on Triskett Road; $3.8 million for Woodland Road; and $1.8 million for Larchmere Boulevard.

 

An unhappy Robert Brown, Cleveland's planning director, told a NOACA committee Friday that Cleveland does not want to delay those three projects.

 

They are "well advanced" and "ready to go," he said.

 

The city is willing to push back work on Waterloo Road and on bridges near Tower City, he said. And the city could possibly delay replacing an East 79th Street bridge, Brown said......

 

The funding tussle could come to a head July 13, when the NOACA board is scheduled to vote on the underpass project.

 

 

 

 

 

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Great news for the Templin-Bradley building at 5700 Detroit Ave: "The Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization, together with the City of Cleveland and several local arts and business organizations, is using the Our Town grant to design an affordable artist live/work space in Gordon Square. The 24 artist live/work units will be developed in the historic Templin Bradley Building, a site in downtown Cleveland that has been vacant for decades."

http://freshwatercleveland.com/inthenews/placemakinggrant071912.aspx

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That's awesome! These are super competitive grants that require a joint proposal from a municipality and a community organization. Congrats to Detroit Shoreway and the city!

 

Between this and the $500,000 ArtPlace grant in Collinwood (http://blog.cleveland.com/architecture/2012/06/clevelands_collinwood_neighbor.html), Cleveland's going gangbuster with the national arts-based community development dollars :)

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Great news for the Templin-Bradley building at 5700 Detroit Ave: "The Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization, together with the City of Cleveland and several local arts and business organizations, is using the Our Town grant to design an affordable artist live/work space in Gordon Square. The 24 artist live/work units will be developed in the historic Templin Bradley Building, a site in downtown Cleveland that has been vacant for decades."

http://freshwatercleveland.com/inthenews/placemakinggrant071912.aspx

 

This is really positive. This building (right next to Latitude 41 IIRC) is an eyesore, surrounded by barbwire fencing.

 

p.s. Anyone want to make any predictions as to whether/when continued street improvements will continue east or west of Gordon Square?

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That's awesome! These are super competitive grants that require a joint proposal from a municipality and a community organization. Congrats to Detroit Shoreway and the city!

 

Between this and the $500,000 ArtPlace grant in Collinwood (http://blog.cleveland.com/architecture/2012/06/clevelands_collinwood_neighbor.html), Cleveland's going gangbuster with the national arts-based community development dollars :)

 

Exactly...  And its about time Cleveland Orgs started applying and getting their fair share..  Thats why I started sending the RFP's out directly to Cleveland orgs last year (and 8Shades, why I started to engage Valerie at CPAC) 

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