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Cleveland: Detroit-Shoreway / Gordon Square Arts District: Development and News

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Some photos from today.

 

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The old Lou's furniture, with scaffolding removed and new windows, Detroit and W. 67th.

 

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The back of Lou's from W. 67th, with Near West Theatre's site in the foreground.

 

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The P.J. Shier building. Future home of M% Gallery. Detroit between 65th and 67th.

 

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The Kennedy building, on the far corner, will be the new home to Gypsy Beans & Baking. Detroit and W. 65th.

 

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The unique Muriel Building, part of the Gordon Square Homes project, Detroit and W. 70th.

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so, who's going to come up with the money for them to bury those power lines?  I know that a sidewalk widening may be in the works for this busy intersection and it would be a shame to miss out on an opportunity like that.  Though, I hear it's quite expensive to do...

 

Thanks for the shots, B12!  Exciting stuff!

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MGD, power line burial is supposedly part of the streetscape plan. Though streetscape is budgeted at about $4 million, which seems low to include new sidewalks, lighting, street narrowing AND burial. Who knows.

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The planning Commission approved a plan last Friday that will bury the power lines in the Kamm's Corner area.

It was on the summary calendar, so there was no discussion.

 

I wonder if there has ever been a study comparing the cost of underground and overhead utilities.

I would think that the periodic cost of replacing poles hit by vehicles, storm damage, and normal wear and tear would be higher over time then the upfront cost of burying.

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^Good question regarding relative costs.  The one down side of burying is the jack-hammering (which apparently must be at 7:30am right outside my apartment) required to repair/replace cables.  I'm still for it though.  Looks sooooo much better.

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I like having overhead wires crisscrossing the city streets.  Visually it gives the street a bit of a ceiling and adds to the clutter of urban streetscapes.  I say leave them.

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I don't think the area around W65th and Detroit is going for the pristine, cosmopolitian look that certain parts of downtown should maybe be going for.  Stripping away layers of urbanity doesn't make a more enjoyable setting, just take a look at what has happened to Coventry.  It's a shell of it's former self urbanistically.

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MTS...WHERE is your sense of urbanism!?!?!  We should keep all the wires, and while we are at it...give residents free pairs of shoes to toss over the wires as well!  Keep the wires so Cleveland can look like the neighborhoods in NYC...wait...I mean Chicago...uh, wait....I mean DETROIT!  :)

 

As a firefighter, I hate those poles, wires, and above ground utilities...they get in the way of fire ground operations.    Beyond that though, they just look plain ugly and pose potentia hazards.

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I've never thought of utility poles as "layers of urbanity".  Maybe we could bury the wires, and then put up non-functioning public art designed to look like wires and poles.  Then we would be considered forward thinking by the architectural press.

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"The same can be said of East 4th Street."

 

As someone who remembers the former Wig Walk *ahem* East Fourth Street before it was rehabbed, sorry - it was hideous back then. Hideous with a capital F. Urban? Yeah... wig stores are definitely going to attract urbanites with disposable income.

 

"just take a look at what has happened to Coventry.  It's a shell of it's former self urbanistically."

 

That's because the people who made Coventry what it was have since moved on, for things like... employment.

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W 28th...I think you're defining "urbanistic" in a different way than some of us here.  And not that aesthetic beauty is "urban," but I think Coventry is much more picturesque today than it was 2, 5, 10, 20 years ago.  Sure, the retail mix and clientele is a little different, but what they've done with streetscaping is pretty outstanding...from the decorative elements to the pedestrian crossings...I give 'em an "A!"

 

I can't really speak to E. 4th, because I didn't really frequent it in the past, but I do remember walking by or down the street and thinking that it was something special...and too bad there's no reason for me to come here!

 

Gordon Square is unique because it has such fantastic and intact architecture, but the sidewalks are so narrow that you can barely pass a pedestrian going the opposite direction.  And Detroit is no E. 4th...it's a busy street!  I'm not sure how or if they'll widen the sidewalk (taking away on-street parking will be a challenge), but there needs to be something done to make the pedestrian experience better.  I have no doubt in my mind that the cdc is working diligently on this!

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Mister Good Day, I'm fine with the fact that our definitions may differ, that's what makes this site interesting and why I continue to post.

 

I just enjoy seeing the city as a space that doesn't have to be prepared for visitors to come and enjoy.  Now it may be utility poles that are removed first because people don’t like overhead wires, next it is old school paintings on buildings you see on the buildings along Fleet Ave because people will say the area looks faded or rundown, then traffic lights are removed to speed traffic because people have to drive right? (Little Italy’s light at Murray Hill and Mayfield was removed, and with it ease of crossing Mayfield for pedestrians and the hustle and bustle of stop and go traffic, not good for commuters, but we should be worrying about the pedestrian here) etc, etc.  Then what?  We are left with a poorly planned, suburban visitor friendly, homogenized version of what something once was.  I realize the nature of cities is that of change, but it should be change for the better, and hopefully if these utility lines are buried something progressive is designed and built there to properly replace the old.  I guess what I’m saying is that we need better planning at a city level, (if they got some of us here from urbanohio, I think we’d be getting better results, or at least some arguments).

 

Also, if these utility wires are buried, what will the new lamp posts look like?  Hopefully "new" is the operative word for their appearance, and that the city doesn't see this as a place to install neoclassical light posts.  It would be great if we, gulp, had a DESIGN COMPETITION for new lamp posts replacing the old ones here in Cleveland.

New York City had one a few years ago and the results are pretty cool:

 

http://www.nyc.gov/html/ddc/html/citylights/

 

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I agree, w28th, that sharing different perspectives and opinions is what this site is all about.  I hope you understood that that was what I meant to say in line one of my preious post...

 

I also agree that we, as a city/region/citizenry, could do a lot more to push the design agenda in our places.  Competitions like the one you mentioned above can do nothing but positive things for the future of our cities by increasing participation, awareness and potentially, the output.  Tokyo has several districts that are distinguished by their street lighting.  I was there for only two weeks, but I began to recognize where I was because of the unique design found in each neighborhood.  Whether this was intentional or just a great side effect, I don't know!

 

In Gordon Square, I might support something more old-fashioned, merely because that's what was there originally and the buildings at the main intersection (65th & Detroit) were all built prior to 1920.  There's also something to be said for desiging lights that are pedestrian oriented versus street oriented.  You can have more than one lamp on a single post...one at a height of 20 feet or so, for the street, and another at a height of 12 feet or so, for the sidewalk.

 

I, however, disagree that these efforts are done to make the place friendly primarily to visitors.  Coventry, West 25th, Mayfield, Wade Oval...these are spaces that visitors will certainly enjoy and be more likely to return to than if the sidewalk experience was unimproved, but they are also much greater amenities for neighborhood residents who walk those streets every day...not just once a week/month.  And they are most often the product of neighborhood and stakeholder meetings/workshops that produce the basic ideas that go into the design.  I'll give you that they could be more inclusive, but the initial effort is usually there.  Sometimes it just takes a champion to keep the public involved.  If no one is interested in coming to the meetings, then they'll stop having them.

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I understand your point to possibly seeing older styled lighting/traffic signals at W65th and Detroit because of the surrounding context, but there is a lot of merit to utilizing the idea of exposing the contrast between new and old as a dynamic design gesture.  It reveals the intricacies and detail of the old (buildings, in the case of W65th & Detroit) vs. the smooth or angled of the contemporary (lighting/signals), playing off the idea of the city being a multilayered organism.  This idea could be used throughout the city in a variety of different programs. 

 

In a previous thread somebody brought up the idea of using the grain silos near the Center Street swing bridge as some ultra contemporary condominium complex.  I love that.  Imagine how interesting this would look if some weird shaped addition to those silos was designed onto it.  Maybe it engages the river somehow.  It’s just an example, but it can be applied to almost anything.

 

We need to define the time that we’ve had control of the city, and there is no other way to do that than to always be forward thinking when it comes to urban planning and design.  We should be saying, “let’s use what’s left of this old industrial city to be the most progressive city in the world, aesthetically, and then one would hope at some point, socially.”

 

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In a previous thread somebody brought up the idea of using the grain silos near the Center Street swing bridge as some ultra contemporary condominium complex. I love that. Imagine how interesting this would look if some weird shaped addition to those silos was designed onto it. Maybe it engages the river somehow. It’s just an example, but it can be applied to almost anything.

 

Thanks! See...

http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php?topic=9270.msg104135#msg104135


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Yes, I love the grain silo idea...it's been done more than a couple times and in a variety of ways.  I'll post my fave later...

 

"there is a lot of merit to utilizing the idea of exposing the contrast between new and old as a dynamic design gesture.  It reveals the intricacies and detail of the old (buildings, in the case of W65th & Detroit) vs. the smooth or angled of the contemporary (lighting/signals), playing off the idea of the city being a multilayered organism.  This idea could be used throughout the city in a variety of different programs."

 

Though I do think that historically appropriate fixtures would be nice in certain places, I do agree with w28th that a program like this could yield some fabulous results!  I think we'd benefit a great deal from something like this and I think it could be a wonderful success (or a colossal failure, who knows?) and why not try?  Cleveland Public Art, local design schools (CIA, UDC, Levin, etc) and the utility companies could run a year-long charette or competition and everyone would end up paying more attention to the little things they pass by each day.  Who could complain about that?

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http://www.wkyc.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=54852

 

Cleveland neighborhood gets makeover

 

Reported by  Tom Beres 

Created: 7/26/2006 9:07:23 AM

Updated:7/26/2006 9:43:41 AM

 

CLEVELAND -- Something exciting is going on in an old Cleveland neighborhood.

It's getting a makeover and becoming a hip place to live and visit.

 

We're talking about Gordon Square -- along Detroit Avenue between West 58th and West 73rd Streets.

 

From new and remodeled theaters to galleries and shops, our Senior Political Correspondent Tom Beres shows us the new booming arts district.

 

Click the "Play Story" link to watch Tom Beres' report.

 

(Here's the link to the video http://www.wkyc.com/video/player.aspx?aid=25280&bw=)

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Gypsy coffee moving business near Shoreway

Thursday, October 05, 2006

By David Plata

West Side Sun News

After two decades as a wholesale coffee operation in a Fulton Road warehouse, Gypsy Beans & Baking Co. is moving to the Detroit Shoreway neighborhood.

 

And while the wholesale coffee sales, serving restaurants in the Greater Cleveland area and beyond, will continue, the new venue also will include a neighborhood coffee house.

 

I've always been an urban pioneer of sorts, said Niki Gillota, who is spending some $200,000 to move the business and open at the new location.

 

I love being in a community, added Gillota, who has lived in Lakewood about a year but is looking to move back to Cleveland. I think Cleveland is so great for having these little pockets of community that grow and expand and develop around some key players.

 

The new business covers 2,200 square feet at the southeast corner of West 65th Street and Detroit Avenue, in a former Dollar Store, vacant about two years.

 

It's awesome, said Councilman Matt Zone, D-17, noting the key players Gillota referred to include the 1point618 art gallery and a new Mediterranean-style restaurant, yet to be named, to be opened by chef Marlin Kaplan _ all of them next to Cleveland Public Theatre.

 

The project is aided by some $30,000 in city loan and grant funds, including $20,000 routed through Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization, which owns the building.

 

Matt Wiederhold, the group's commercial development director, said the property was kept vacant until the right project came along.

 

Nothing really fit with the arts district we wanted to do there _ until Niki's proposal, he said.

 

The fix-up was designed by architect Eli Mahler.

 

It was pretty much bare-bones space, Gillota said. We had to remove the ceiling and put up a fire barrier; we're redoing the hardwood floors, putting new hardwood floors in toward the front; all of the electrical and plumbing _ things like that.

 

Gillota said the business, expected to open the second week of November, will have five employees at first.

 

Hopefully by next summer we'll be up to nine or 10, she said.

 

She described the new venture, seating about 15 on antique oak or Mission Arts and Crafts tables and chairs, as a European-style coffee house.

 

That means cappuccino, espresso, drip coffee, she said. I'm using a variety of beans from around the world. Like your Costa Ricans, your South Americans; different roasts of those blends.

 

Our house blend is going to be a darker roasted mocha java. Mocha javas tend to be smooth and creamier. We want something that's very snappy and palate-cleansing to complement the food and pastries.

 

Gillota said all pastry _ muffins, scones, quickbreads, such as banana, zucchini carrot, cranberry orange and more _ will be baked on-site.

 

 

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Detroit-Shoreway CDO has begun marketing the artists' lofts in the old Lou's Furniture building. They are being called "Near West Lofts." Income restrictions apply; you can't be a full-time student or make more than I think $28,000/year (for a single person). Here are a couple interior photos; the units are quite beautiful and the upper floors have views of the lake! All units have their own washer and dryer.

 

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IMG_0017.jpg

 

Also, Gypsy Beans & Baking is looking sharp. They've got their new windows in featuring a nice, old-timey logo.

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Just as a quick add on to projects in this neighborhood.  Some may have been talked about already.  There is a new art gallery, and a graphic design firm moving into open spaces on south side of Detroit west of 65th.  

 

There is an issue on the ballot for residents of Precinct I(very small area between 58th and 65th and bridge and Detroit) to approve a liquor license for a new restaurant next to Maschke Architects.  Should be a very cool restaurant if approved.  By the chef that is at Walnut One downtown.  

 

There is a new wine bar opening up north of Detroit on 65th called Toast.  

 

There is a new pub called "stone Mad" that is currently under construction north of Detroit on 65th. It will be an Irish pub/restaurant with boccie ball.  It is by the owner of the Tree House in tremont.  He has invested nearly two million dollars in this pub.  It is on the west side of 65th, it is pretty cool looking.

 

And Matt Zone has secured over 2 million dollars in a streetscape makeover for next year which includes burying electric lines, widening sidewalks for outdoor seating and cafe areas, and other various art related add ons (not sure the exact details).

 

Also, down the way, pipe dream sort of, is to renew the capital theater into a three screen indie movie theater, akin to the Cedar Lee.  I was in this space last weekend, it is amazing, falling apart but amazing.  Supposedly they do have some funding and this project will happen, but it seemed to me like it would be down the line.  This is the theater in the Gordon Square Arcade.

 

Lastly is the Near West Theater moving to behind Lou's Furniture, better known as the lofts shown above.  I believe this will happen next year.

 

Most of these are underway or will be soon.  I live in this hood, I'm very excited about things to come, including Battery Park and the new bakery.

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Thanks for the enthusiasm and updates and welcome to the forum!  Much of that info has been posted elsewhere, but it's always nice for the newbies to see a concise run-down of what's going on...

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I tried to up load this from my itunes, for all to enjoy, but I dont think I did it right as it said the file was to large.   Oh well.....back to dance around the house to house music!

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Thanks Musky!

 

Another Traxx Cleveland moment!  People say studio 54 was legendary (they just got more press) ..but Cleveland's Traxx was the shiznit.

 

Straight, Gay, Black, Latin, White, Male, Famale, Drag Queen....when you went to Traxx....everyone had a good time!

 

Ok...back to the topic!!! :wave:

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Thanks Musky!

 

Another Traxx Cleveland moment!  People say studio 54 was legendary (they just got more press) ..but Cleveland's Traxx was the shiznit.

 

Straight, Gay, Black, Latin, White, Male, Famale, Drag Queen....when you went to Traxx....everyone had a good time!

 

Ok...back to the topic!!! :wave:

 

my first night club experience was the Traxx in Dc in 1984...nothing will ever compare so I do not even try any more. NOW back to topic..

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Thanks Musky!

 

Another Traxx Cleveland moment!  People say studio 54 was legendary (they just got more press) ..but Cleveland's Traxx was the shiznit.

 

Straight, Gay, Black, Latin, White, Male, Famale, Drag Queen....when you went to Traxx....everyone had a good time!

 

Ok...back to the topic!!! :wave:

 

my first night club experience was the Traxx in Dc in 1984...nothing will ever compare so I do not even try any more. NOW back to topic..

 

OK Ms. Peabody....saying you went to Traxx in DC....I have confirmation you were a party girl!  Cause Traxx in DC was not in the safest neighborhood, frankly, it was straight up scarey, but once you got inside....it was hot!

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