Jump to content
oneglove

Cincinnati: Pendleton: Development and News

Recommended Posts

Yeah, neighborhood/community councils are obnoxious NIMBY collectives everywhere. 

 

As far as this appeal goes, though, that is pretty common in historic preservation. I worked for a bit in preservation for the city of LA, and I dealt with many appeals for infill projects or additions to homes. If the historic review staff wrote their findings well, and can support the basis for the approval, this project shouldn't have any problems. The community council that the project is in supports the project, and appeals are really supposed to look at the merits of the project and how it conforms to the preservation guidelines or secretary's standards. The fact that the OTR CC doesn't feel included enough in the process shouldn't be enough to win an appeal. Now, if they can uncover some sort of technicality, like a mandatory noticing requirement that wasn't followed, that could spell trouble. But based on what I've read about this project and its appeal, I think it should go forward. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, JYP said:

 

You can't get rid of them but if you live in the neighborhood you can join and have voting privileges for the low cost of $3.

 

http://otrcommunitycouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/OTRCCMembershipForm2017.pdf

 

I tried getting involved in the OTRCC.  I was a board member of the Downtown Residents Council for two years and thought it could be a bit of a mess sometimes.  However, the culture at the OTRCC is toxic to the extreme.  You literally have people shouting at each other and grabbing microphones out of the peoples' hands.  If you value your sanity stay away from that hot mess.  It's no wonder anyone who wants to make a difference in the community does their best to avoid them.


"Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago." - Warren Buffett 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

The Zoning Board of Appeals unanimously voted to grant the motion to dismiss the Over-the-Rhine Community Council’s appeal of the Historic Conservation Board’s approval for a $40 million mixed-use project in Pendleton.

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2019/01/17/zoning-board-makes-decision-on-appeal-of-40m.html?iana=hpmvp_cinci_news_headline

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm so happy this project won't be delayed. It's a massive development for Pendelton and OTR.

 

We can debate the design back and forth for ages, but the bottom line is that otr needs dense residential units.

 

OTR is far to dead on the weekdays at night. Just stroll through main Street at midnight and it's like a ghost town, compare to how the street is flooded on the weekends. Hell, even pins closes at midnight last night because there was no one there.

 

Plain and simple we need more people living in otr, and we need ALOT more people. It's not just about allowing these businesses in otr thriving on weekends but also on week days as well. 

 

Plus, more residents means more "eyes" on the street which will allow the bad apples who still thrive in drug dealing and there bad criminal behavior to realize that they have to go to price Hill or Avondale to do there new criminal activites.

 

When the streets are dead, crime thrives. Plain and simple. We need people who live in otr to deter crime and support businesses regardless of how appropriate the design may or may not be.

 

 

 

Edited by troeros

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that density is necessary, but will never happen if NIMBYs want to keep all the buildings at 3 stories. 5 even and we will never get there.

Edited by Yves Behar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this will be a great project in addition to the Urban Sites project if they can get that one figured out in adding more critical mass. My other wish lists for next two years: The area of Main and Central Parkway (Salvation Army Site) and of course the Elm and Liberty Project. Then you hope the other big lot next to this projects gets built and then eventually the Kroger redevelopment encompassing that large area which hopefully at that time, the Liberty Street Project is finished and you can have a nice size development in the Grammar's area hugging up to the reduced street size.

Edited by IAGuy39

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the Salvation Army building as an unlikely disrupter of an otherwise large street wall.  At some point almost all of these halfway-nondescript med-century buildings are going to be gone across the United States. 

 

Also, remember that skyscrapers of basically the same style are being built in 200+ cities around the world.  U.S. cities are unusual not just for typically having old skyscrapers, but also having ones built between 1960 and 1990.  In addition, we have small and oddball mid-sized buildings in our cities built between those years that no city in Europe or Asia or the Middle East will ever have. 

 

So stuff like the Salvation Army building is actually important to keep if we want the story of the city's evolution to remain. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's exactly why some groups are trying to get buildings like the Salvation Army building on Central Parkway and the Peaslee building on 14th labeled "historic" in an attempt to precent them from being demolished and redeveloped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah nobody thought anything of the Washington Park school when it was demolished.  There were tons of those schools but they're being demolished left-and-right all across the country. 

 

A lot of suburban public school districts have torn down their 1950s/60s school buildings.  This has put places like LaSalle and McAuley and St Xavier in the odd position of being the last survivors of that era of suburban school construction. 

 

The Colerain library on Galbraith Rd. was a circa-1960 gem that was superficially similar to the Salvation Army.  That thing was torn down around 2010 and replaced by a blob.  That circa-1960 library had a "Los Angeles Brady Bunch" style to it, with a peaked roof and green tilework that you can't get anymore. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, jmecklenborg said:

Yeah nobody thought anything of the Washington Park school when it was demolished.  There were tons of those schools but they're being demolished left-and-right all across the country. 

 

A lot of suburban public school districts have torn down their 1950s/60s school buildings.  This has put places like LaSalle and McAuley and St Xavier in the odd position of being the last survivors of that era of suburban school construction. 

 

The Colerain library on Galbraith Rd. was a circa-1960 gem that was superficially similar to the Salvation Army.  That thing was torn down around 2010 and replaced by a blob.  That circa-1960 library had a "Los Angeles Brady Bunch" style to it, with a peaked roof and green tilework that you can't get anymore. 

 

Here's a 1965 Gem. My middle school in Cedar Rapids, IA

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.0265083,-91.6509964,3a,75y,148.32h,88.28t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s5LehcCPJwZ4mGOzLv7kY4w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jmecklenborg said:

I like the Salvation Army building as an unlikely disrupter of an otherwise large street wall.  At some point almost all of these halfway-nondescript med-century buildings are going to be gone across the United States. 

 

Also, remember that skyscrapers of basically the same style are being built in 200+ cities around the world.  U.S. cities are unusual not just for typically having old skyscrapers, but also having ones built between 1960 and 1990.  In addition, we have small and oddball mid-sized buildings in our cities built between those years that no city in Europe or Asia or the Middle East will ever have. 

 

So stuff like the Salvation Army building is actually important to keep if we want the story of the city's evolution to remain. 

 

I agree with you about the importance of preserving mid-century architecture, however a lot of the buildings from this time period utilized terrible site plans that make them problematic in urban areas. In the case of the Salvation Army building, there is a moat of parking separating the building from 12th Street. Brutalism and non-residential mid century modern architecture often created sites that either ignore, or are actively hostile to their surroundings, which is part of what makes them difficult for preservationists. See the Terrace Plaza as exhibit A in this discussion...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the EPA is probably the most problematic preservation question, because its bizarre grass moat is as much part of the building as is the building. 

 

It speaks to what is expected of a workplace these days that the Terrace's windowless section isn't even considered Class C office space -- it's basically unrentable to anyone in 2019. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Largue said:

They began taking soil samples on Saturday for the project at 1118 Sycamore. 

20190126_151228.jpg

So glad this is moving forward. This will make a huge difference in that area and really bring OTR and Pendleton together. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is this project taking up the entire surface lot between Sycamore and Bunker Alley?  Or just half the lot?  Either way it's great to see these lots starting to get filled in.  Hopefully this project is so successful it leads to the others in the area getting developed.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The project is up for a vote today in  the budget and finance committee at 1pm. The project is just the entire Central Parking lot from the alley to 12th, it does not include the Arnold S Levine owned lots where the Pedal Wagon garage is located. 

 

See page 197: https://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/council/meeting-agendas-minutes/budget-finance-committee1/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe this project will be roughly the size of the red square on this map. The other parking lots in that area, including the one between this project and Lucious Q, are owned by the Levine family.

IMG_0004.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that sucks.  Does this Levine family not have any interest in developing or selling their parking lots?  They're a complete eyesore to the neighborhood.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, cincydave8 said:

The project is up for a vote today in  the budget and finance committee at 1pm. The project is just the entire Central Parking lot from the alley to 12th, it does not include the Arnold S Levine owned lots where the Pedal Wagon garage is located. 

 

See page 197: https://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/council/meeting-agendas-minutes/budget-finance-committee1/

 

Interesting, this project will be paying into VTICA for 30 years. (It is exempt for the first two years but goes up in year 3 to at 7.5% of the abatement value, jumps in year 5 to 15%, year 7 to 20%, years 16 through 30 back down to 15%, making for an average rate of 15% throughout the project's 30-year abatement.) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Cincy513 said:

Well that sucks.  Does this Levine family not have any interest in developing or selling their parking lots?  They're a complete eyesore to the neighborhood.  

 

They are probably like the Josephs with their downtown lots. Parking revenue is a stream of money that just keeps coming in without you having to do anything. Both are probably also hoping someone comes along and makes them a huge offer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, taestell said:

I believe this project will be roughly the size of the red square on this map. The other parking lots in that area, including the one between this project and Lucious Q, are owned by the Levine family.

IMG_0004.jpg

You are correct, anything that is darker on the screen was either re-paved or sealcoated by the Levine family. The lot that is lighter gray was the lot that was sold for the new development. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Cincy513 said:

So is this project taking up the entire surface lot between Sycamore and Bunker Alley?  Or just half the lot? 

 

image.thumb.png.c27848b68c3e5f4211530cfe86b1a590.png

image.thumb.png.44858a94998742b50ddbbcd74dab4580.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Arnold Levine died last January...his son is the only remaining family member with the law practice. They have a low office in Pendelton so sort of makes sense why they have the lots.

 

I'm sure if this project is a success, they will probably get a high ball offer in the future for the remaining Pendelton lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I missed the Pendleton Neighborhood council meeting last night, but I heard this udpate.  Matthew Andrews from the city came and presented about a 7 lane option for the liberty street road diet.  Essentially keeping the road as is but with pedestrian bump outs.  Pendleton voted in favor of this.  I don't know if this is going in front of OTRCC again or if this is just making up for Pendleton not being included in the presentations for the road diet in the first place.  Seems like with FCC coming in though, the road diet is never going to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, JoeHarmon said:

I missed the Pendleton Neighborhood council meeting last night, but I heard this udpate.  Matthew Andrews from the city came and presented about a 7 lane option for the liberty street road diet.  Essentially keeping the road as is but with pedestrian bump outs.  Pendleton voted in favor of this.  I don't know if this is going in front of OTRCC again or if this is just making up for Pendleton not being included in the presentations for the road diet in the first place.  Seems like with FCC coming in though, the road diet is never going to happen.

 

Update on your update...Council members announced on twitter they have pushed forward a resolution to continue with the 5 lane option and have 6 votes needed to proceed with this plan without further Public input sessions. The 6 votes also allow it be veto proof for mayor cranely. This is scheduled for Wednesday.

Edited by troeros
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/28/2019 at 9:00 AM, Largue said:

They began taking soil samples on Saturday for the project at 1118 Sycamore. 

20190126_151228.jpg

 

I saw another one of these machines in that parking lot yesterday. Must be taking more soil samples.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, taestell said:

 

I saw another one of these machines in that parking lot yesterday. Must be taking more soil samples.

 

What exactly is the purpose of soil samples? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, troeros said:

 

What exactly is the purpose of soil samples? 

 

To get financing there has to be environmental work done to see if there is soil contamination in case the property falls into receivership. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JoeHarmon said:

I know that site used to have an old brewery building on it.  Anyone know if there are tunnels under that parking lot?

Short answer, probably.

 

There is very little documentation about the demolition, but going on past experience at other historic brewery sites there is probably at least the lower lagering cellar still extent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, troeros said:

What exactly is the purpose of soil samples?

 

20 hours ago, wjh2 said:

To get financing there has to be environmental work done to see if there is soil contamination in case the property falls into receivership. 

 

19 hours ago, Traveler Joe said:

Also need to calculate footer size and depth, as well as determine other civil/structural requirements.


The main purpose of soil samples is basically what @Traveler Joe has said. They are using giant augers that that take a sample of the cross-section of earth at specific locations around the site. Engineers use this information to determine the bearing capacity of soil. Is it loose fill? Is there an abundance of unsuitable, organic material? How far down is bedrock? This information dictates the structural foundation type to be used: piles, footers, raft foundation, etc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Snapped some photos the other night of the new BrewDog going in at Reading and Lockport. The architects are DKB out of Columbus. The space definitely has potential to be really nice. 

 

20190418_222419.thumb.jpg.18561672b3542dc3a55197a3566475a2.jpg

 

20190418_222056.thumb.jpg.674339417f290485826dc323ce4db18f.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...