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Cincinnati: Pendleton: Development and News

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With the streetscape improvements and activity brought by the Horseshoe Casino, were starting to see activity with some of the abandoned buildings. This is in the 500 block of E 12th Street:

 

This building is part of the Model Group's projects in Pendleton and will be low income last I heard. I would estimate they own about 20% of Pendleton buildings, including most of the 1100-1200 block of Broadway, which was supposed to begin transformation into 60+ market rate apartments this fall. Hopefully this is still the plan.

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By some miracle, I still wish they've develop something on those gigantic, ugly parking lots across from Diner on Sycamore.

 

Those things are hideous.  They're always parked to capacity during business days though, so I'm sure it would take a pile of cash to get whomever owns them to sell.  In a perfect world, a good size mixed use development would do wonders in connecting Pendleton to the rest of OTR.  If Old Woodward ever does end up becoming a Marriott boutique, I can't imagine they'd be content with that mess as a front yard.

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$26M Development Coming Near Horseshoe Casino

 

The first phase of Broadway Square, which received $10.2 million in new markets tax credits in September, will include 40,000 square feet of residential space — 26 one-bedroom and 13 two-bedroom units — and about 11,000 square feet of retail space. At least 39 apartments will be included in the second phase, Maly said.

 

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2013/10/02/26m-development-coming-near-horseshoe.html

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This project is pretty massive. Pendleton has so much potential to be a more family-oriented, slower, quieter portion of the core and I think the mix of one and two bedrooms here will hopefully support that.

 

Random question, but does that sunflower lot still exist? I haven't been over there in quite some time and always thought that was a great use of a vacant property.

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Random question, but does that sunflower lot still exist? I haven't been over there in quite some time and always thought that was a great use of a vacant property.

 

Still there. The sunflowers didn't do as well this year, but the community garden was well used. It likely won't be a vacant lot by the end of next year - plans have been in the works for some time.

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^Yeah I thought I remembered that that husband-wife team that built those townhomes nearby owned it and planted the sunflowers as a nice holdover until later development plans came through.

 

It'll be sad to see it go but maybe it can move elsewhere since there are certainly plenty of other vacant lots that could use some sunflowers. I love creative uses for vacant lots while they wait for development. Something temporary and community driven.

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good news, just seeing that picture of the location makes me hope that this will help with the vibrancy of the neighborhood and encourage infill and new growth in the neighborhood with all those huge parking lots surrounding the area.

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By some miracle, I still wish they've develop something on those gigantic, ugly parking lots across from Diner on Sycamore.

 

Those things are hideous.  They're always parked to capacity during business days though, so I'm sure it would take a pile of cash to get whomever owns them to sell.  In a perfect world, a good size mixed use development would do wonders in connecting Pendleton to the rest of OTR.  If Old Woodward ever does end up becoming a Marriott boutique, I can't imagine they'd be content with that mess as a front yard.

 

The AC Hotel at the old SCPA sounds pretty official now. So it's possible that they could buy up those parking lots and build a garage.

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^I'm thinking the AC Hotel and this project are just those projects. I actually have a feeling that this area is going to be really useful for getting people with kids and slightly older people back into the area. It is more suited to a quieter, more private lifestyle which will be more enticing to people who aren't sure about raising kids in a place like OTR or Downtown. It'll help create more diversity in choice.

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Should be noted.  New construction town homes to be built on Pendleton at the end of the street, and also several on Spring.  Access will be through Ray Alley.  Project will include two rehabs. Very exciting.

 

1401659_4.jpg

 

1401659_3.jpg

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Standing in the new Spring Street Plaza, all of the construction around it is really impressive.  The weird angles on the buildings opposite the church have the potential to be a really unique border to the space.  I'm hoping Model Group paints them all different colors to bring attention to the angles.

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I am a big fan of the way the plaza has been redone. It reminds me of similar plazas in front of churches in Europe and I hope that there is some effort in the future to program the space in a way that would compliment the new development and the event center in the church.


“All truly great thoughts are conceived while walking.”
-Friedrich Nietzsche

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<a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2014/07/21/horseshoe-casino-cincinnati-expands.html">Horseshoe Casino Cincinnati expands</a>

 

Barrett J. Brunsman

Staff reporter - Cincinnati Business Courier

Jul 21, 2014, 12:14pm EDT

Construction has begun on the foundation for an 8,700-square-foot expansion to the Horseshoe Casino in Cincinnati’s Pendleton neighborhood.

The project will create a covered patio with a bar, which is expected to cater to smokers of tobacco.

 

That space along Reading in between the street and the parking lot always seemed awkwardly empty, so it's nice to hear that they're filling it in. This should improve the streetscape along Reading and make it feel less like the building's backside.

 

 

 

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Standing in the new Spring Street Plaza, all of the construction around it is really impressive.  The weird angles on the buildings opposite the church have the potential to be a really unique border to the space.  I'm hoping Model Group paints them all different colors to bring attention to the angles.

 

I actually hope they don't paint them.  I hope more developers stop painting rehabs in OTR.  As a homeowner in OTR I've realized that while everyone loves painted buildings at first, they are INCREDIBLY horrible and hard to deal with about 5-7 years in.  The paint fades, peels, chips, and the buildings start to look crappy.  Peeling paint is a code violation in Cincinnati and you can be fined and repainting your standard 4 story building in OTR can easily cost over $10K. 

 

The Good Fellows building on Main is 4 years old and the paint is already peeling and looking horrible.  Many of these buildings were never painted historically, and if you're going to paint the very front facade, for the sake of the gods please don't paint all four sides. Thankfully my building is only painted on the front facade but the ones next to me are from only 2007 and are peeling like crazy on all sides. 

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Standing in the new Spring Street Plaza, all of the construction around it is really impressive.  The weird angles on the buildings opposite the church have the potential to be a really unique border to the space.  I'm hoping Model Group paints them all different colors to bring attention to the angles.

 

I actually hope they don't paint them.  I hope more developers stop painting rehabs in OTR.  As a homeowner in OTR I've realized that while everyone loves painted buildings at first, they are INCREDIBLY horrible and hard to deal with about 5-7 years in.  The paint fades, peels, chips, and the buildings start to look crappy.  Peeling paint is a code violation in Cincinnati and you can be fined and repainting your standard 4 story building in OTR can easily cost over $10K. 

 

The Good Fellows building on Main is 4 years old and the paint is already peeling and looking horrible.  Many of these buildings were never painted historically, and if you're going to paint the very front facade, for the sake of the gods please don't paint all four sides. Thankfully my building is only painted on the front facade but the ones next to me are from only 2007 and are peeling like crazy on all sides. 

 

Actually most of the buildings were painted historically because our bricks aren't as strong as in many other brick-heavy cities.  Our bricks have a tendency to chip and turn to dust.  Painting every five years is definitely a pain, but it's a necessary evil.  In the meantime we're left with a very colorful and beautiful city.

 

For the record, these are the buildings I'm talking about.  Most are already painted and will probably be repainted.  I'm just hoping that they choose some fun colors when they do:

NhoodCasino5.JPG

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It would definitely be interesting if each surface was painted a different color on all those buildings. It could really add some dynamism to the new plaza. And who doesn't like a bit of color?

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Bricks that have been sandblasted need to be painted or sealed at the very least since the hard outer "shell" has been removed, exposing the softer spongier core.  Even so, our orange common brick is very soft and brittle to begin with, not to mention porous.  It really does need to be painted unless it's well protected by overhangs.  Usually only the more expensive and harder face brick on the facade is protected by a cornice, so the exposed common brick on the sides and rear need paint to protect it from the elements.  St. Louis has a lot of great red common brick, and Chicago is known for its buff common brick that looks great after you remove the soot stains it gathers over time.  They're harder and don't need to be painted for the most part.  I'm not sure if it's a matter of the clay used, the type of firing, or a combination of the two that makes up the difference, but it is an important difference. 

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I hear you on the sandblasted brick needing to be painted. Plus it just plain looks better. I need to do that myself.

 

but I'm confused on the whole subject of painting and soft brick. in my area of OTR, which I assume is not unique, it seems that almost every building is not painted on sides and rear, and has never been painted (meaning - it's definitely not been sandblasted, and I can't seen any remnants of even little paint flakes). And the main problem with these buildings seems to be the need for re-tuck pointed head joints, not the brick face. Also, just from memory, it seems that the times that sides of buildings were painted was often when it was on a corner facing a street or alley. One building I own had the front painted and the side facing an alley, but the rear was never painted.

 

So I'm just confused about this being an issue of brick integrity.

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I agree with Jim. MANY OTR buildings have never been painted and many of the ones that are painted were regular brick until redevelopment.

 

Having an HOA of 7-10 condos try to do a $12,000 paint job every 5-8 years because some developer wanted to cover the building in a pretty color is foolish. Paint jobs look amazing at first, but it will hurt the long term value. Like I said, Good Fellows is 4 years old & the paint is horrendous. They don't know what to do because a full paint job is nearly $10K.

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It's not so common in OTR but on the hillsides and in "newer" neighborhoods, there are often two different types of brick -- a façade brick, which usually has very little visible mortar, then a utilitarian brick that has the sloppy-looking mortar.  Toward Hyde Park you will see houses from the late 1800s that have the higher quality "façade" brick on all sides. 

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Don't the historic preservation guidelines actually encourage painting in OTR?

 

Don't know.  But painting a previously unpainted brick house is not permitted in Newport's historic districts.  I can't imagine the bricks are that different.

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The OTR guidelines take a pretty sensible approach...

 

9. Painting: Repaint buildings that were historically painted. Most buildings built before 1890 in Over-the-Rhine were originally painted. Paint is part of the aesthetic design of these buildings and should be maintained. Paint also protects porous nineteenth century masonry and masks alterations and inappropriate repairs. Masonry that has not been painted in the past should not be painted. Because color can have a significant impact on the neighborhood, use paint colors that are appropriate to your building's age and style. Historically, most paint schemes were relatively simple. The Historic Conservation Office can provide owners with color combinations that are appropriate for a building’s age and style. Varying the choice of color between neighboring buildings is preferred.

 

I honestly don't know how long it would take for painted brick left to its own devices to completely shed the paint.  I do think that it probably is possible though, given enough time, or some scrubbing or pressure washing.  Plus there's also the differences in paint types used throughout history...lead, oil, latex, etc.  Off the shelf latex paint of today can act as a vapor barrier, trapping moisture that migrates its way from the inside of the building outwards in winter, then freezing as it gets trapped at the paint, causing peeling and spalling.  One thing though that's pretty universally ok to do to brick is whitewash it.  It cures via chemical reaction rather than simply drying, and it bonds with the brick surface, actually hardening it to some extent.  It's more like applying thin plaster than paint.  I don't know how common that was in OTR though, because it's generally been regarded as a poor man's paint substitute.  Plus white or very light pastels are your only real color choices, and the only color I've ever heard of is pale blue that gets chalkier over time.

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Thanks for the guidelines.  I thought that the undertsanding was that historically, most OTR brick buildings had originally been painted. 

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One other thing to consider is that there was no need to paint the side walls between buildings since obviously they were hidden.  But when one of them was demolished, for whatever reason, the unpainted wall of the building next door was then exposed.  We see a lot more of these side walls now than was ever intended. 

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I don't know how long it takes for paint to completely wash off brick.  I think at least 30 years. 

 

The two buildings on either side of the Findlay Market parking lot entrance were painted neon green in or around 2003 and as you can see 10 years later they have faded to a faint pea green.  The group of buildings at 13th & Sycamore just south of SCPA were all painted candy colors around 1998 and now they are very faded. 

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I agree with Jim. MANY OTR buildings have never been painted and many of the ones that are painted were regular brick until redevelopment.

 

Having an HOA of 7-10 condos try to do a $12,000 paint job every 5-8 years because some developer wanted to cover the building in a pretty color is foolish. Paint jobs look amazing at first, but it will hurt the long term value. Like I said, Good Fellows is 4 years old & the paint is horrendous. They don't know what to do because a full paint job is nearly $10K.

 

HOA fees?

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Most HOA's in OTR don't have $20K-$25k reserves. Especially that you could refill in just a few years.  I know 4 hoas in OTR that have wanted to repainting but can't afford it.

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Speaking of painting, two of the buildings in this photo just got new paint jobs (the orange and purple ones). The paint on the blue one is a few years old but still looks new.

 

14676603479_2bd66a2589_c.jpg

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