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Locations Revealed for 26 New CoGo Stations

 

The next wave of new CoGo stations are scheduled to be installed this summer, expanding the bike share system’s network farther from the Downtown core and into Bexley, Grandview Heights and Upper Arlington for the first time.

 

Thirteen of the 26 new stations will be located in Columbus, including new docks in Clintonville, Milo-Grogan, the University District and the Near East Side.  Another station could be added on the south side, but that one hasn’t been confirmed yet.

 

MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/locations-revealed-for-26-new-cogo-stations-bw1

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I am surprised there's not one west of 315 in Franklinton.  I mean, at least get ONE!


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Off-Street Trail Planned for Franklinton, Souder Avenue Bridge

 

The City of Columbus is moving forward with plans for an off-street trail that would run north from the Mount Carmel campus in Franklinton to the Scioto River. The trail would then continue across the river on a new separated bike and pedestrian section of the Sounder Avenue bridge.

 

The new connection is part of a larger vision for the area — made up of several individual projects, each with different timelines — that the city is calling the Franklinton Loop Trail.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/souder-avenue-bridge-and-trail-bw1

 

Franklinton-Loop-Trail.png?w=642&ssl=1


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Upgrades to Olentangy Trail to Include New Connection to Bethel Road

 

Two major upgrades are planned for the Olentangy Trail: one that will widen a large section of the trail and another that will connect it to Bethel Road for the first time.

 

The trail will be widened from nine to 12 feet starting at Antrim Lake and continuing south to the spot where Bethel Road dead-ends into State Route 315. The idea is to relieve some of the congestion along the trail, which Columbus Recreation and Parks describes as the busiest in the state.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/olentangy-trail-bethel-road-bw1

 

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Dockless Bike Share Company Looking to Expand to Columbus

 

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Columbus may soon be getting a second bike share operator. LimeBike, a California-based company that currently operates in about 50 different cities and campuses worldwide, is planning to launch here this summer.

 

Unlike CoGo, which features a network of stations where users are required to dock bikes after each use, LimeBike offers a completely dockless, or “free-floating” system.

 

LimeBikes are GPS-enabled and trackable by a phone app. The bikes are also equipped with built-in locks so they can be left virtually anywhere, although the company says it works with local entities and neighborhoods to establish specific guidelines about placement.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/dockless-bike-share-company-looking-to-expand-to-columbus-bw1


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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LimeBike Launching Pilot Program in Dublin on Saturday

 

LimeBike, the dockless bike share company that has been exploring a summertime launch in Columbus, will be coming to Dublin even sooner. Starting on Saturday, 100 of the brightly colored bikes will be placed around the city and will be available for users to rent.

 

The roll-out is scheduled to coincide with the city’s Bike Month Kickoff Event, which will take place from noon – 3 p.m. at the Dublin Community Recreation Center.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/limebike-launching-bike-share-pilot-program-in-dublin-on-saturday-bw1

 

timthumb.php?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.columbusunderground.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2018%2F05%2FLIMEBIKE2.jpg&q=90&w=650&zc=1&


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Hmm... Clintonville makes sense, but not sure I can really see this working in Dublin just yet. Even with all their recent improvements it's still a pretty hostile environment up there to anyone who isn't on the inside of a car

 

OTOH, I wonder if Lime will consider adding electric scooters here like they have in SF and elsewhere?

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Download an app, rent a bike: Lime's bright green dockless wheels roll out in Columbus

 

Limebike-TopArt.jpg

 

A bike-sharing system that doesn't require riders to park at specific docks rolled out in Columbus this week, after debuting in northern suburbs last month.

 

Lime has placed 450 of its eponymous green bikes in the city, divided equally among Clintonville, Linden and the Near South Side by Nationwide Children's Hospital. There are 250 in Dublin and 50 in Worthington.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/06/07/download-an-app-rent-a-bike-limes-bright-green.html


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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^ So I haven't ridden one yet (or seen anyone else riding one for that matter...), but LimeBikes are seemingly everywhere in Columbus now. It looks like they drove up and down some of the main streets and just dumped out bikes about a half dozen at a time every other block. I'm intrigued by the car2go-style free floating system, so it will be interesting to see how they start to move around and distribute themselves throughout the city as people use them. Hoping to give it a try this weekend, though I kinda wish we had gotten the scooters instead

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CoGo Bike Share to Continue Expansion, Add Stations at Easton

 

CoGo Bike Share has announced new bike stations will be coming to Easton as ongoing plans for expansion into Bexley, Grandview Heights, and Upper Arlington are underway.

 

Four CoGo bike stations, including 60 docks and 32 bikes, will be placed at one of Columbus’ most popular shopping and entertainment destinations. Previous plans for expansion already included 26 additional stations and 232 bikes.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/cogo-bike-share-to-continue-expansion-add-stations-at-easton-tm1

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/07/09/cogo-bike-share-coming-to-easton.html

 

cogo.jpg


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Wheels aplenty, but can the region support 2 bike services?

 

You see them in downtown Columbus. You see them in the suburbs. GoGo bikes docked in neat rows. Lime bikes lined up by the curb or scattered outside a restaurant or library.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/07/19/wheels-aplenty-but-can-the-region-support-2-bike.html


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https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/07/19/a-reporter-s-ride-cogo-with-a-splash-of-lime.html

 

Above is a paywalled article and video from a Columbus Business First reporter who took both of the city's bike-sharing services (CoGo and Lime) for a spin around the Arena District - which Business First has their office.  Hopefully the video is available for non-subscribers.  If it isn't, the reporter's overview of both services is thus:

 

-- She preferred the ride quality of the CoGo bike over the Lime bike.  But she preferred the dockless convenience of the Lime system over the docked CoGo system (apparently getting the CoGo bike out of and into the docking station proved difficult for her).

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Proposal Would Close the Gap in the Olentangy Trail

 

Regular users of the Olentangy Trail know that there is only one section of the shared-use path that detours away from the Olentangy River and onto city streets. That happens on either side of the North Broadway bridge in Clintonville, roughly halfway between the trail’s two endpoints, Worthington and Downtown.

 

A new proposal would close that gap by taking the trail over two new bridges and onto the west side of the river for about half a mile. Northbound users would cross the first new bridge at Como Park, which would deposit them onto a new section of trail running past Kohl’s and along the eastern edge of the new OhioHealth office complex. They would then cross North Broadway at grade and continue along the river to the second new bridge, which would connect them back up with the existing Olentangy Trail at Northmoor Park.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/olentangy-trail-bridges-bw1

 

Olentangy-Trail-proposed-full-map-509x620.png


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Work to Start on Bike-Friendly Improvements in Clintonville

 

Work is scheduled to start soon on a long-planned set of improvements designed to encourage biking in Clintonville. New markings will be painted on certain streets and new signs will be installed, with the goal of establishing a bike-friendly network that will connect a variety of destinations in the neighborhood.

 

“This project is intended to offer low-stress biking options throughout Clintonville so that people of all ages and abilities feel comfortable riding,” said Jennifer Gallagher, Director of the city’s Department of Public Service, in a press release.

 

Now called the Clintonville Neighborhood Bikeways project, the plan was first floated by resident Will Koehler, who set up a group called Clintonville Neighborhood Greenways to advocate for and promote the idea back in 2015.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/work-to-start-on-bike-friendly-improvements-in-clintonville-bw1

 

Clintonville-greenways-map-448x620.png


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Will Columbus Ever Build More Protected Bike Lanes? Scooter Users May Have a Say

 

Although there are no current plans to build more protected bike lanes in Columbus, planners and transit advocates point to a recent development that may help to build the case for them: the sudden appearance of hundreds of rentable electric scooters on the streets of Columbus.

 

Both of the companies operating here, Lime and Bird, discourage users from riding on sidewalks. The city also recently proposed legislation to enforce the no-sidewalk rule. In practice, though, if riders don’t feel comfortable on the street — and in Columbus, so far it looks like many of them don’t — the sidewalk is still where they end up.

 

That sets up the potential for conflict between pedestrians and scooters, which, at speeds of up to 20 mph, travel much faster than anything else on the sidewalk.

 

“We have to figure out ways to accommodate these types of uses, that are faster than walking but slower than cars,” said Jason Sudy, an urban planner at OHM Advisors and a member of the Italian Village Commission. “This is a great example of the different types of modes that will be popping up. None of us would have anticipated the speed and popularity of mini electric scooters, and it really underscores the importance of having these kind of medium-speed lanes, where you can have a safe experience (but also) not impede the overall traffic flow.”

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/will-columbus-ever-build-more-protected-bike-lanes-scooter-users-may-have-a-say-bw1

https://www.columbusunderground.com/protected-bike-lane-on-summit-seeing-high-ridership-but-city-not-planning-to-build-more-bw1

https://www.columbusunderground.com/plans-for-better-bike-lanes-bw1

 

scooterbike-1150x550.jpeg


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Will Columbus Ever Build More Protected Bike Lanes? Scooter Users May Have a Say

 

Although there are no current plans to build more protected bike lanes in Columbus, planners and transit advocates point to a recent development that may help to build the case for them: the sudden appearance of hundreds of rentable electric scooters on the streets of Columbus.

 

Both of the companies operating here, Lime and Bird, discourage users from riding on sidewalks. The city also recently proposed legislation to enforce the no-sidewalk rule. In practice, though, if riders don’t feel comfortable on the street — and in Columbus, so far it looks like many of them don’t — the sidewalk is still where they end up.

 

That sets up the potential for conflict between pedestrians and scooters, which, at speeds of up to 20 mph, travel much faster than anything else on the sidewalk.

 

“We have to figure out ways to accommodate these types of uses, that are faster than walking but slower than cars,” said Jason Sudy, an urban planner at OHM Advisors and a member of the Italian Village Commission. “This is a great example of the different types of modes that will be popping up. None of us would have anticipated the speed and popularity of mini electric scooters, and it really underscores the importance of having these kind of medium-speed lanes, where you can have a safe experience (but also) not impede the overall traffic flow.”

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/will-columbus-ever-build-more-protected-bike-lanes-scooter-users-may-have-a-say-bw1

https://www.columbusunderground.com/protected-bike-lane-on-summit-seeing-high-ridership-but-city-not-planning-to-build-more-bw1

https://www.columbusunderground.com/plans-for-better-bike-lanes-bw1

 

Kind of interesting that these rentable electric scooters, derided as frivolous toys, might led to more protected bike lanes because of the scooters popularity and new city rules prohibiting their use on sidewalks.  The scooters popularity is creating a need for medium-speed lanes - faster than walking but slower than driving, as was said in the above article.  These medium-speed lanes are basically dedicated bike lanes, or dedicated bike/scooter lanes if they're used jointly.

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Update on the bikeway improvements in Clintonville - https://www.columbusunderground.com/work-to-start-on-bike-friendly-improvements-in-clintonville-bw1 - and previously posted at https://www.urbanohio.com/forum/index.php/topic,17537.msg936305.html#msg936305 from today's Dispatch.

 

Work is underway on the Clintonville bikeways plan.  But according to the linked article below "not everyone is happy with the new Clintonville bike routes" - because of course, it is still Clintonville.  Also a b/w version of the color bikeways map posted previously in this thread:

 

http://www.dispatch.com/news/20180915/not-everyone-happy-with-new-clintonville-bike-routes

 

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New CoGo Bike Share Stations Installed

 

New CoGo bike share stations are being installed throughout Columbus, as well as in Upper Arlington, Grandview Heights and Bexley.

 

Many of the two dozen-plus new stations are already stocked with bikes, and the attached kiosks – which feature touch-screens that enable users to buy one or three-day pass – are online and ready to be used, according to an updated map on CoGo’s website.

 

The new additions bring the total number of stations to 72. A federal grant secured by the Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission will cover about 80 percent of the cost of the expansion, with each of the four jurisdictions paying the rest.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/new-cogo-stations-installed-bw1

 

cogo-bike-share-1150x550.jpg


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Biker bonus: Proposed Olentangy Trail connector would cross river, edge OhioHealth HQ

 

A proposed final segment taking the Olentangy Trail off city streets would cross the river twice and edge the OhioHealth Corp. administrative campus.

 

To be sure, the multi-use path still would cross busy West North Broadway, but at a new intersection with improved visibility.

 

Columbus Recreation and Parks has applied for a $2.8 million federal grant through the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission toward the $5.3 million project. It's among five trail projects seeking $10.6 million in grants from about $10 million available; the decision comes in March.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/09/21/biker-bonus-proposed-olentangy-trail-connector.html

 

olentangy-trail-como-to-northmoor*750xx1070-1424-113-94.jpg


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A Semi-Truck Driver Confused The Olentangy Bike Path With A Freeway On Ramp And Chaos Ensued

 

Yesterday morning a semi-truck driver mistook an entry point to the Olentangy Bike Trail for an entrance ramp to SR 315.  The driver kept going down that trail until his semi-truck got wedged into one of the freeway bridges that go over the trail.  Here are the details and some visuals of the bizarreness:  https://www.columbusnavigator.com/semi-truck-crash-olentangy-bike-path/

 

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Here's an aerial of the Olentangy Trail entry along Spring Street (aka US-33).  I left a marker where the trail entry point is at.  The driver kept going north on the trail until his truck got wedged into a 670 ramp that passed over the trail:

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Obviously the semi-truck driver made a huge error.  But I do have to give him some credit - that bike trail entry does sorta resemble an on-ramp to the 315 freeway in the background!  And it was wide enough to accommodate the semi.  You can even take a google streetview trip down the Olentangy Trail at https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9660401,-83.0197422,3a,60y,315.89h,90t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sp-kn_l36mZ6_o9Uu_a5Oow!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en

30181876117_565b916a83_b_d.jpg

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Where the semi got stuck WAS the on ramp until about 1993. GPSes are so stupid that they resurrect old alignments ALL THE TIME. Autonomous cars will kill people because of stuff like this ALL THE TIME.

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On 10/5/2018 at 2:17 PM, Columbo said:

A Semi-Truck Driver Confused The Olentangy Bike Path With A Freeway On Ramp And Chaos Ensued

 

Here's an aerial of the Olentangy Trail entry along Spring Street (aka US-33).  I left a marker where the trail entry point is at.  The driver kept going north on the trail until his truck got wedged into a 670 ramp that passed over the trail:

30181873657_09467a38bd_b_d.jpg

 

 

The Dispatch had a little more about this incident:  https://www.dispatch.com/news/20181008/semi-driver-cited-for-trip-on-olentangy-trail

 

"Stephen Tracey, 68, of Dunnellon, Florida, faces one count of reckless operation and another count of failing to obey a traffic control device.  Tracey exited the northbound lanes of Route 315 at Spring Street Thursday morning, only to realize he had made a mistake and needed to get back on Route 315, police said.  He mistook an entrance to the Olentangy Trail for an entrance ramp to Route 315, police said.  The trail entrance is right across the street from the Route 315 exit ramp onto Spring Street."

 

That aerial shows the 315 exit ramp that took him to Spring Street.  Then he crossed Spring Street onto what he thought was an on-ramp back to 315.  But it wasn't an on-ramp, it was a bike trail!  Like we said earlier, that bike trail entry does resemble an on-ramp.  Bad luck for that trucker.  At least there was no damage to the overpass bridge or the trail - which has now reopened.

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On 10/5/2018 at 2:17 PM, Columbo said:

A Semi-Truck Driver Confused The Olentangy Bike Path With A Freeway On Ramp And Chaos Ensued

 

 

 

Obviously the semi-truck driver made a huge error.  But I do have to give him some credit - that bike trail entry does sorta resemble an on-ramp to the 315 freeway in the background!  And it was wide enough to accommodate the semi.  You can even take a google streetview trip down the Olentangy Trail at https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9660401,-83.0197422,3a,60y,315.89h,90t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sp-kn_l36mZ6_o9Uu_a5Oow!2e0!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en

30181876117_565b916a83_b_d.jpg

There is no applicable reason of why the bike way flares out like that at Spring Street. If additional width is needed so vehicles can get back to the pump station, then that can be accomplished with reinforced turf (green pavement)


Formerly "Mr Sparkle"

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Lime-E.jpg

 

First E-Bikes Arrive in Columbus

 

Lime has placed the first rentable e-bikes onto the streets of Columbus.  E-bikes, also called pedal assist bikes, are equipped with a battery that provides a pedal-activated power boost.  Lime started offering the bikes, which it calls Lime-E, as an option in certain markets in January, but Columbus riders until now could only choose between the company’s traditional bikes and its electric scooters.

 

The new Lime e-bikes cost $1.00 to unlock and 15 cents a minute to ride (the same price as a scooter), while non-electric Lime bikes cost five cents a minute to ride.  All three can be located and rented via mobile app and returned anywhere within the service area, which includes most central Columbus neighborhoods.  Lime has also placed bikes in Worthington and Dublin.

 

MORE:  https://www.columbusunderground.com/first-e-bikes-arrive-in-columbus-bw1

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cogo-bikeshare0023.jpg

 

Lyft acquires CoGo bike-share parent Motivate

 

Lyft Inc. has acquired the operator of CoGo bike share in Central Ohio, making it the operator of 80 percent of bike-sharing rides nationally.  Lyft announced Friday it had completed its acquisition of New York City-based Motivate. ... Lyft is parrying its chief rival in automotive ride-sharing, Uber Technologies Inc., which in April acquired bike-share service Jump Bikes.

 

Motivate Inc. has operated CoGo under a contract with Columbus Recreation and Parks since 2013.  Its latest one-year contract expires Jan. 31, after which City Council said it would consider a multi-year extension.  CoGo has about 50 stations with nearly 400 bikes in Central Ohio following an expansion to Easton Town Center this summer.  It also has stations throughout Columbus and in Bexley, Grandview and Upper Arlington.

 

MORE:  https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/11/30/lyft-acquires-cogo-bike-share-parent-motivate.html

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MORPC funding could wipe Olentangy Trail’s gap off map

 

Quote

The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission on Dec. 18 released a list of proposed new transportation projects around central Ohio that could receive federal funding. That list included nearly $3.5 million to close the Clintonville gap in the Olentangy Trail and to build a pair of bridges to connect it to a trail across the Olentangy River.

 

http://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20190107/morpc-funding-could-wipe-olentangy-trails-gap-off-map

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Columbus moving forward on Scioto Trail extension

 

scioto-greenway-recreational-trails.jpg

 

It looks like Columbus wants to start the process of extending the bike trail along the Scioto River.

 

The city's parks and recreation department recently put out a request for proposals for design and engineering to extend the Scioto Trail from its current end point at 5th Avenue to Griggs Park. This project was one of 17 major new projects the department unveiled in 2017 as part of a five-year expansion plan.

 

The Scioto Trail is one of the most prominent of the city's bike trails – about 150,000 people live in a short walk or ride of the path that exists today. It's one of six "green belt" bike trails totaling 92 miles that wind through the city's urban neighborhoods.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2019/04/03/columbus-moving-forward-on-scioto-trail-extension.html


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https://www.dispatch.com/news/20190506/columbus-council-approves-deal-to-widen-build-ramp-on-olentangy-trail

 

Construction will start this summer to widen part of the Olentangy Trail and build a ramp to the trail from Bethel Road on the Northwest Side.  Columbus City Council voted Monday to approve a contract that would pay Complete General Construction as much as $3.7 million for the project.  The Columbus company was the lowest of four bidders.

 

A shared-use path along Bethel Road would link Anheuser Busch Park on Olentangy River Road to a new ramp and tunnel that connects to the trail.  More than a mile of the trail, from Bethel Road to Antrim Park, will be widened from 9 feet to 12 feet.  The project also will include a tunnel to carry traffic between Bethel Road and the trail.

 

Construction will begin in July, with completion expected in May 2020.

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Olentangy Trail Updates: Detour, Widening and Bridge Plans

 

A portion of the Olentangy Trail will be closed from May 13 to July 12 as construction work ramps up on Founders Park, the 20-acre development on former Battelle parking lots in Harrison West.

 

The trail will be closed between West Fifth and West Third avenues, where users will be detoured east to a separated pathway along Perry Street.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/olentangy-trail-updates-detour-widening-and-bridge-plans-bw1

 

Screen-Shot-2019-05-08-at-10.45.11-AM-53


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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New e-bike systems coming to Columbus this summer (plus a few more scooters mixed in).  Probably most notable is Roam Bikes, which locally-owned and features fat-tired bikes with long, cushioned seats to provide a more comfortable ride than traditional bikes:

 

RoamBikes-1-1-620x465.png

 

New Scooter Companies, Local E-Bike Startup Set to Enter Columbus Market

 

Three new “micro-mobility” companies have received approval from the City of Columbus to enter the market and are planning summer launches.

 

Jump, which was acquired by Uber last April for $200 million, will deploy both its rentable e-bikes and scooters, while Spin, which was acquired by Ford Motor Company in November, will soon be rolling out its bright orange scooters.  Roam Bikes, a startup founded by local entrepreneur Kelly James, plans to deploy 200 e-bikes on the streets of Columbus this June, with a total fleet of about 500 in place by the fall.

 

The three newcomers enter a market that already has Bird and Lime — which both launched here last summer — and CoGo, the docked bike share system that was established in 2013 (and that was acquired by Lyft last fall).

 

MORE:  https://www.columbusunderground.com/new-scooter-companies-local-e-bike-startup-set-to-enter-columbus-market-bw1

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Plan for Temporary Bus Lane on Third Street Concerns Bike Advocates

 

The City of Columbus and the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) are moving forward with plans for a demonstration project involving a stretch of Third Street Downtown.  Starting on July 22 and running for two weeks, the far right hand lane of the one-way street, between Long and Mound Streets – which currently holds a striped bike lane, as well as about 24 on-street parking spaces – will be opened up for bus travel during the evening rush hour.  

 

It is the first of several planned “tactical urbanism” projects, in which temporary, low-cost improvements to streets are made in order to try out new traffic patterns, gather feedback and collect data. ... Transit and cycling advocates were excited about this idea, hopeful that it would help build support for something that has rarely occurred in car-friendly Columbus – taking a portion of the public right of way that is used by single-occupancy vehicles and giving it to buses, bikes and scooters instead.

 

But the news that an existing bike lane – and not a car travel lane – would be used for the first of what the city is calling its “shared mobility lane” projects has been met with concern by many in the biking community.

 

MORE:  https://www.columbusunderground.com/plan-for-temporary-bus-lane-on-third-street-concerns-bike-advocates-bw1

 

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On 6/13/2019 at 7:23 PM, Columbo said:

Plan for Temporary Bus Lane on Third Street Concerns Bike Advocates

 

The City of Columbus and the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) are moving forward with plans for a demonstration project involving a stretch of Third Street Downtown.  Starting on July 22 and running for two weeks, the far right hand lane of the one-way street, between Long and Mound Streets – which currently holds a striped bike lane, as well as about 24 on-street parking spaces – will be opened up for bus travel during the evening rush hour.  

 

It is the first of several planned “tactical urbanism” projects, in which temporary, low-cost improvements to streets are made in order to try out new traffic patterns, gather feedback and collect data. ... Transit and cycling advocates were excited about this idea, hopeful that it would help build support for something that has rarely occurred in car-friendly Columbus – taking a portion of the public right of way that is used by single-occupancy vehicles and giving it to buses, bikes and scooters instead.

 

But the news that an existing bike lane – and not a car travel lane – would be used for the first of what the city is calling its “shared mobility lane” projects has been met with concern by many in the biking community.

 

MORE:  https://www.columbusunderground.com/plan-for-temporary-bus-lane-on-third-street-concerns-bike-advocates-bw1

 

 

Okay, I want to give a little opinion and experience run down on this experiment now that it is up and going and maybe ask for bit of info or input. 

 

First, since announcement, I was actually pretty receptive of the concept of creating a Bus/Bike Lane for a possibly quick solution to speed up transit while maintaining current infrastructure. With that being said, having now experienced it two days in a row, I have some major issues and concerns. While I am not ready to call this a failure, I really do not see the current form being successful or safe at all. I am a daily bike commuter, I ride in mixed traffic and bike lanes and with that being said, this is the least safe I have ever felt biking downtown... Its a terrible, absolutely terrible. 

 

Here's why - Busses are large vehicles, I absolutely felt and believe bus drives are very aware, agile, and respectful of bikers and pedestrians (especially downtown), the bus itself sharing the lane never once felt unsafe but what happens with the busses is where the problems started. Downtown busses stop every few blocks, this automatically puts bikers in groups in a way between the busses that are flowing in the lane from stop tp stop. Because of this that means every time a bus stops or gets stacked (which often happens downtown as well) the biker is forced to make a choice to either wait behind the bus (which can be quite a while if stacked or trying to adjust its route timing) or attempt to merge into traffic lanes to go around while also trying to make sure no cars were trying to turn from the second lane since some of the turn lanes have been moved out of the bus lane configuration. 

 

So I guess my question is if there is a solution, or something I am missing because I just don't see how this achieves a whole lot as-is. Overall it felt significantly less safe and functional having to stop, merge, and hope the bus hadn't started moving yet, as opposed to the previous flow. Anyway, just some personal experience for everyone keeping an eye on this stuff. I hope these quirks can be resolved but it feels like a pretty thrown together "looks good on paper" project as it is.  

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It seems the best implementation for bike/bus combo lanes would be on arterial roads outside of downtown in neighborhoods so that buses aren't stacking and there aren't frequent stops due to the many things downtown offers in a dense area. Downtown, it likely needs to be separated into 2 lanes.

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Separation of uses is always the ultimate goal. When the volume of of buses and bikes is low it can work. So much of this kind of stuff is quite volume sensitive.

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On 6/13/2019 at 7:23 PM, Columbo said:

Plan for Temporary Bus Lane on Third Street Concerns Bike Advocates

 

The City of Columbus and the Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) are moving forward with plans for a demonstration project involving a stretch of Third Street Downtown.  Starting on July 22 and running for two weeks, the far right hand lane of the one-way street, between Long and Mound Streets – which currently holds a striped bike lane, as well as about 24 on-street parking spaces – will be opened up for bus travel during the evening rush hour.  

 

It is the first of several planned “tactical urbanism” projects, in which temporary, low-cost improvements to streets are made in order to try out new traffic patterns, gather feedback and collect data. ... Transit and cycling advocates were excited about this idea, hopeful that it would help build support for something that has rarely occurred in car-friendly Columbus – taking a portion of the public right of way that is used by single-occupancy vehicles and giving it to buses, bikes and scooters instead.

 

But the news that an existing bike lane – and not a car travel lane – would be used for the first of what the city is calling its “shared mobility lane” projects has been met with concern by many in the biking community.

 

MORE:  https://www.columbusunderground.com/plan-for-temporary-bus-lane-on-third-street-concerns-bike-advocates-bw1

 

Screen-Shot-2019-06-10-at-2.44.49-PM.png

 

Test finds bike lane helps COTA buses Downtown

 

Preliminary results from a two-week pilot program show that Central Ohio Transit Authority buses traveled more quickly through Downtown on 3rd Street by using a shared bus-bicycle lane.  During the pilot program, the average time dropped from 7 minutes, 45 seconds to 5 minutes, 39 seconds when it ran during evening rush hours — 3 to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays — from July 22 through Aug. 2.  Police were stationed along 3rd Street during the trial period.

 

COTA officials have said the southbound-only street often becomes backed up during evening rush hour, delaying buses by 10 to 25 minutes.  The city’s Department of Public Service contracted with a company to set up camera-based counters to analyze car, bus, bike and scooter traffic.  Preliminary numbers indicated increased bicycle and scooter use during the test.

 

Catherine Girves, a bicycling advocate and executive director of Yay Bikes, said she rode the bus-bike lane and said it could work, but not in a corridor where a bike lane already exists.  She said she has concerns about motorists who are confused and try to pull into the bus-bike lane. ... She said that when she rode, she had no close calls with buses, but she did with cars turning right.  “Let’s add a bus lane in addition to a bike lane,” she said. “Let’s try it, and let’s do it correctly.”

 

Columbus City Council President Shannon Hardin said that the results make him want to test more pilot projects.

 

MORE:  https://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20190817/test-finds-bike-lane-helps-cota--buses-downtown

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