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Indianapolis: Developments and News

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Lucan Oil Stadium

 

HKS, Inc. is the architectural firm credited with the stadium’s design, with Walter P. Moore working as the Structural Engineer of Record. The stadium will feature a retractable roof and window wall, allowing the Colts to play outdoors. The elements of Kinetic Architecture will provide for quick conversion of the facility to accommodate a variety of events—allowing for increased use of the building and increased return on the investment.

 

Features:

  • Retractable Roof
  • It is scheduled to host Super Bowl XLVI in 2012
  • 63,000 football capacity (5k more than RCA Dome)
  • 70,000 capacity for SuperBowl (built to be expanded for SuperBowl)
  • The basketball configuration will exceed the 40,000 minimum seating capacity required to host the NCAA Final Four. Unlike most basketball contests played in dome facilities, the court at Lucas Oil Stadium will be placed in the center of the facility instead of one of the end zones.
  • 2 massive Daktronics high definition scoreboards (97 ft wide and 53 ft tall)

 

Mechanized retractable roof

Lucas Oil Stadium has a retractable roof designed by Uni-Systems that divides lengthwise into two retractable panels weighing 2.7 million pounds each, with each half sliding down the sloping roof of the stadium into the open position. The stadium roof is gabled, with the peak running north and south down the center of the field, paralleling the sidelines. A cable drum drive system drives the retractable roof panels up and down the sloped track. Rather than dragging the 32 1-1/2" diameter galvanized cables across the fixed roof, this system’s patented design lays the roof cable down, and then picks it back up. In nine minutes, the roof panels will simultaneously move to the open position at the touch of a button. To guard the stadium’s interior from weather conditions the roof is designed with a large cap that will run the length of a sealed overlap between the parting roof panels. Just beneath the sealed overlap will be a large trough, finalizing the retractable roof’s layers of protection. This retractable roof is the first ever that divides lengthwise[7].

 

The Lucas Oil Stadium retractable roof system is operated by 32 cables 1-1/2” diameter galvanized right and left hand lay. They were manufactured specifically for this project by Wire Rope Corporation of America and furnished by The Tway Company Inc. located in Indianapolis. The lengths vary from 232’6” to 245’ and include a Johnson Wedge Socket installed on one end that terminates the cables at the roof peak 285’ above the stadium floor.

 

Moveable window wall

A large windowed gate at one end of the stadium allows additional light while closed and allow for a more open feel while open. It is the largest movable glass wall in the world. The transportable window wall is 214 feet (65 m) by 88 feet (27 m), and composed of six 88 ft (27 m) × 38 ft (12 m) glass-clad panels. Each panel rides on a steel rail while the wall opens and closes, and is supported by two hardened steel wheels. The window separates at the center, with three panels amassed on each side when in the open position. The six wall panels move simultaneously during opening and closing in only six minutes. Window seals were installed, fully shielding spectators from any weather conditions. When in the closed position, the perimeter of each wall panel is sealed with rain-tight, air-tight seals.

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I really like this venue...very cool, and it plays to the fieldhouse design that Indiana is known for.

 

1.

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2.

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3. Basketball set up

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4.

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5.

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6. Football set up

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7. Concert set up

Lucas-Oil-stadium-chesney_tn.jpg

 

8.

projects-lucasoil-small.jpg

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every time i travel to or even see another new football stadium I get very very angry about Cleveland Browns Stadium.  Of course that is what you get when you have a "trust" running your team and building your stadium.... a generic concrete turd.

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This is what $720M gets you...roughly $300M more than award-winning Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati.

 

But this one has a retractable roof and therefore it will be hosting NCAA championships and superbowls. You'd also need to adjust the PBS price tag for inflation.

 

As far as domes go, this is a vast improvement on the prior Colt home.

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I thin PBS looks better than this, though I will admit I'm not a fan of the indoor stadiums for football or baseball, and I don't think that just because the roof can open means that they're playing "outside".

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What is great about this facility is its ability to be in use throughout the year. Basketball, NCAA events, concerts, etc... Its also been designed to double for extra convention center space and will be connect to the soon to be expanded convention center (on the old RCA dome site). If you are going to spend this type of money it might as well be used for more than 11 football games each year, so the community can see a much bigger return on its investment. This also can help spur more activity and development around the facility since it function a lot more than a single use stadium.

 

The design is very much in line with the history of Indiana.

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What is great about this facility is its ability to be in use throughout the year. Basketball, NCAA events, concerts, etc... Its also been designed to double for extra convention center space and will be connect to the soon to be expanded convention center (on the old RCA dome site). If you are going to spend this type of money it might as well be used for more than 11 football games each year, so the community can see a much bigger return on its investment. This also can help spur more activity and development around the facility since it function a lot more than a single use stadium.

 

Agreed on all points, well done Indy.

 

This is what $720M gets you...roughly $300M more than award-winning Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati.

 

But this one has a retractable roof and therefore it will be hosting NCAA championships and superbowls. You'd also need to adjust the PBS price tag for inflation.

 

I know...I just wanted to throw that number out there though.  You know, see if I could stir the pot at all.  :evil:

 

As far as domes go, this is a vast improvement on the prior Colt home.

 

Absolutely...I couldn't believe that the RCA dome only held 58,000.  I'm even more surprised that this isn't bigger than 63,000.  Although the capacity for basketball will be truly impressive.

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I thin PBS looks better than this, though I will admit I'm not a fan of the indoor stadiums for football or baseball, and I don't think that just because the roof can open means that they're playing "outside".

 

You would be if you went to Opening Day in Cleveland in 07'.  14" of snow and 29 degrees in April...ARGH.

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How is this building "built to be expanded" to 70,000 for the SuperBowl?  Are the renderings the 63,000 capacity or 70,000?  I just don't see room for it to be expanded from the renderings...

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^Home field advantage...I don't see the Patriots and Packers complaining when the snow piles up on their fields.

 

C'mon, were talking baseball.  Cleveland had to send their first 5 home games to Milwaukee and frofeit the homefield for the opening series and part of the second series.

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^Didn't they only send the LA series to Milwaukee??? 3 games?  And the Seattle series was split between Cleveland and Seattle if I remember right.

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Now I remember about last season being the Indy Colts final season in the ole Hoosier/RCA Dome.  That puffy domed roof was really cutting edge technology back in the 80's!

 

This is the first I've seen of the new Lucas Oil Stadium in detail.  Very impressive.  Very expensive too.  But that multi-use capability is a really good idea.  Unusual for a primarily football stadium.

 

Great thread.  Thanks for posting UncleRando.

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It looks like a damn barn. I hate NFL domes, they're blasphemous. I don't mind retractable roofs, unless they are opened every game EXCEPT when it rains and the opening is wide enough to even justify the "retractable" part (which this one doesn't look like it does, but I've never seen it in person or on TV).

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I love it.  I'm normally not a fan of domes (football should be played outdoors) but Indy's not a stupid city (NCAA HQ, Superbowls, etc) and this does match their fieldhouse heritage.  Fantastic job (love the symmetry towards Monument Circle).

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It looks nice and all, but I for one have one major issue: its too big compared to its surroundings.  I work really close to the damn thing and get to stare at it all the time.  It actually dwarfs downtown Indy and makes dt Indy look smaller than the stadium itself.  It is too big.  It would be like going into OTR and building a large and in charge office building or something that diminishes the quality of the surrounding neighborhood.  Ya know, the reason for form based zoning.  Am I off base here?  But I gotta tell ya, these Indy folk sure love this thing and act like its the coming of Jesus. 

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It looks nice and all, but I for one have one major issue: its too big compared to its surroundings.  I work really close to the damn thing and get to stare at it all the time.  It actually dwarfs downtown Indy and makes dt Indy look smaller than the stadium itself.  It is too big.  It would be like going into OTR and building a large and in charge office building or something that diminishes the quality of the surrounding neighborhood.  Ya know, the reason for form based zoning.  Am I off base here?  But I gotta tell ya, these Indy folk sure love this thing and act like its the coming of Jesus. 

 

Hopefully what develops around it will help the scale of the facility fit more into the area.

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But I gotta tell ya, these Indy folk sure love this thing and act like its the coming of Jesus.

 

What's new...with all the stories of "Indy is better than Cincy" "Indy is the best this" "convention center blah, blah, blah.  Most Indy people, that I've met, think everything that Indy does is wonderful and the best thing since sliced bread.  Sure, Indy has done some good stuff over the past 10-15 years, but hell it's not faring much better than Cbus, Cincy, and is about even with Minneapolis.  So it's good by Midwest standards...that ain't saying much.

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Did anyone else see the Lucas Oil Stadium on last night's NBC Sunday Night Football game? 

 

The nighttime aerial shots were quite impressive.  Mostly focused on the Lucas Oil Stadium with the roof open.  The neighboring AAA ballpark was lit up for the occassion.  The old RCA Dome across the street from the Lucas was not.  Also, some aerials of their downtown's Monument Circle looked great.

 

Indy's got a "stadium district" going on here with Lucas, RCA dome and the AAA ballpark.  Is the Pacers Fieldhouse near here too?  This seems mostly good, except for what looks like a large amount of surface parking in the area.

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RCA Dome Roof Deflated

 

More than 24 years after it opened its doors, the RCA dome began its slow demise to demolition.  Wednesday morning at 10:47, former Indianapolis mayor Bill Hudnut gave the command to turn off the 16 fans keeping the dome roof inflated.  Crews are now cutting away the 250-ton dome roof.  Once it's removed, they'll continue to prepare the dome for its implosion.  Only the upper half of the dome will be imploded.  The blast is not expected to be as dramatic as when Market Square Arena fell.  Once the rubble of the dome is gone, work will begin on a $ 275 million expansion of the Convention Center.

 

TIME LAPSE OF ROOF DEFLATION: http://www.wibc.com/video/wibctv.aspx

 

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Indy was a blast during Super Bowl XLVI last week.  I spent a lot of time hanging out downtown.  Unlike most recent Super Bowls, all of the major events were concentrated in the heart of downtown.  Over 1.1 million people came downtown over ten days, enjoying the fantastic Super Bowl Village along three blocks of Georgia Street - which has been converted into a pedestrian focused corridor (like 200,000 "pedestrians" on Friday night).  Two stages were set up with packed concerts filling the streets pretty much every night.  Bands ranged from local groups to LMFAO, The Village People, Morris Day and the Time, En Vogue, Patty LaBelle, and many others.  Other huge parties were going on all over the downtown area including one with Katy Perry and another one with Lupe Fiasco.  Buddy Guy was playing at the Slippery Noodle.  Lots of Fun.  Amazingly - the late January through early February weather was unbelievably, unseasonably warm and sunny -- with high temps mostly in the 50s and low 60s.  There were also 4 Zip Lines running for about two blocks over Capitol Avenue next to the Convention Center.  Oh yeah --- then there was the game at Lucas Oil Stadium (which is why I posted this here).

 

Everything was exceptionally well run.  The Giants scored in the last minute to take the four point lead that they barely held onto until the clock expired as a Hail Mary pass from Tom Brady fell a foot or so from a diving Rob Gronkowski.  Many positive comments were sent out fromsports writers and other journalists from across the US and from other places around the world.  Things have now returned to normal -- but hopefully the successful hosting of this huge event will help Indy continue to land many more huge sporting events and large conventions for the next several decades.

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I also went and it was fantastic.  Indianapolis did a bang-up job and should be commended.

 

I was there as well and I thought that was you!  I would recognize your......ah...well. 

 

I'm jaded, and I thought Indi was just "OK".  That was the most Gay people in INDI ever!

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Playing catch-up with Indianapolis.

 

Developers of $50M Mass Ave project drop billboard from design

 

Montage_rendering_NEW_no_board_440px.jpg?1467989144

 

Developers of a $50 million mixed-use development to be built on Massachusetts Avenue have dropped a controversial three-story electronic billboard from the project’s design. They also changed the building's name.

 

Desma Belsaas, an architect at Schmidt Associates, the designer of the residential-retail development formerly known as Montage on Mass, informed the Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission of the decision Wednesday.

 

New plans, which IHPC approved unanimously, now call for a “glazed feature” made of glass in the rectangular space on the facade that was previously reserved for the “digital canvas,” Belsaas said.

 

“It became clear that ‘the billboard’ was not something the commission would approve, so we still have this rectangle to get approval from the commission,” she told IHPC members.

 

More below:

http://www.ibj.com/articles/59350-developers-of-50m-mass-ave-project-drop-billboard-from-design

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Firm redeveloping ex-Coca-Cola plant faces daunting preservation challenges

 

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The stately campus of art deco buildings adorned in terra cotta along Massachusetts Avenue east of College Avenue once churned out 2.3 million Coca-Cola bottles a week as the largest bottling facility in the world.

 

Today, the plant designed by Rubish & Hunter and built starting in 1931 represents one of the city’s trickiest preservation challenges.

 

It has been maintained with few alterations since the late 1960s by Indianapolis Public Schools, which used it as a warehouse, bus garage and central kitchen. But the property’s purchaser, Wisconsin-based developer Hendricks Commercial Properties, wants to turn the 11-acre site into a $260 million development with apartments, offices, retail space, a hotel and a movie theater—all while incorporating as much of the historic character as possible.

 

More below:

http://www.ibj.com/articles/59310-firm-redeveloping-ex-coca-cola-plant-faces-daunting-preservation-challenges

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High-end retailer West Elm plans Mass Ave hotel

 

West Elm, the housewares brand owned by Williams-Sonoma Inc., said Monday that it plans to open a boutique hotel with at least 120 rooms and a rooftop bar in the former Coca-Cola bottling plant on the north end of Massachusetts Avenue.

 

Brooklyn, New York-based West Elm said the hotel is one of five it plans to open starting in late 2018 as part of a diversification beyond running its 93 retail stores. The other hotels will be in Detroit, Minneapolis, Charlotte, North Carolina; and Savannah, Georgia.

 

More below:

http://www.ibj.com/articles/60545-high-end-retailer-west-elm-plans-mass-ave-hotel

 

hendricks-2_1464136220691_38897896_ver1.0_900_675.JPG

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Phoenix Theatre raises $5.1M toward new complex

 

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The Phoenix Theatre has raised $5.1 million toward the $8.5 million it needs to fund construction of a new theater building at the northwest corner of Illinois and Walnut streets in downtown Indianapolis, Phoenix officials announced Wednesday.

 

Officials said they are launching a capital campaign to raise the other 40 percent of the funds. They also unveiled designs for the project by Indianapolis-based Ratio Architects.

 

More below:

http://www.ibj.com/articles/60690-phoenix-theatre-raises-51m-toward-new-complex

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