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Another dumb-a$$ list / Ranking of cities

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(Another flawed silly list)

 

StubHub Reveals America's 20 Most Rockin' Cities of 2008

Marketwire

Nation's Largest Ticket Marketplace Ranks Most Active Markets for Summer Concert Tickets

August 13, 2008: 08:00 AM EST

 

StubHub, the world's largest ticket marketplace, today announced its 20 Most Rockin' Cities for 2008 based on overall gross ticket sales in each market. Over 90 North American cities/regions populate event listings on StubHub. Once again an exceptional line-up of summer tours sent fans rushing to buy tickets to watch their favorite country stars, rock legends and pop acts. Many shows sold out, some within minutes of going on sale, but a record number of fans continue to use the StubHub marketplace to find access and great values. With so many tickets changing hands, StubHub has compiled its third annual list of America's 20 Most Rockin' Cities. Summer concerts in these cities have been the most active sellers on StubHub with rankings based on total sales for concert events only, occurring between May 15th and September 15th. StubHub has also included the three best selling shows in each city for additional perspective.

 

...

 

America's 20 Most Rockin' Cities:

2008 City Rank  (2007 Rank)  Top Selling Shows:

1.  New York          (1)    Billy Joel 7/18, 7/16, Bruce Springsteen 7/31

2.  Boston            (4)    Kenny Chesney 7/26, Bruce Springsteen 8/2,

                              Neil Diamond 8/23

3.  Los Angeles      (2)    Radiohead 8/24, 8/25,

                              Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers 6/25

4.  Philadelphia      (5)    Kenny Chesney 7/19, Jimmy Buffett 6/14,

                              Coldplay 7/25

5.  Chicago          (3)    Kenny Chesney 6/21, Coldplay 7/23,

                              Jimmy Buffett 7/26

6.  SFBay Area        (6)    Kenny Chesney 6/8, Coldplay 7/18,

                              The Police 7/14

7.  Hartford        (10)    Dave Matthews Band 6/14, Coldplay 8/2,

                              Billy Joel 5/31

8.  Detroit          (9)    Kenny Chesney 8/2, Jimmy Buffett 6/10,

                              Bon Jovi 7/7

9.  Richmond        (17)    Jimmy Buffett 8/30, Dave Matthews Band 6/28,

                              Jonas Brothers 8/18

10. Dallas            (7)    Radiohead 5/18,

                              Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers 8/27,

                              Jonas Brothers 7/9

11. Atlanta          (12)    Jimmy Buffett 6/5, Kenny Chesney 7/13,

                              Eagles 5/17

12. Las Vegas        (8.)    Coldplay 7/19, Kenny Chesney 6/6,

                              The Police 5/23

13. Indianapolis    (N/A)    Kenny Chesney 9/13, Jimmy Buffett 7/29,

                              Dave Matthews Band 7/26

14. Atlantic City    (19)    Jimmy Buffett 8/24, American Idols Live 8/2,

                              Killers 8/1

15. Seattle          (16)    Dave Matthews Band 8/30, Radiohead 8/20,

                              Dave Matthews Band 8/31

16. Denver          (13)    Jack Johnson 8/17, Rush 6/25,

                              Jonas Brothers 7/19

17. Houston          (18)    Radiohead 5/17, Kenny Chesney 8/16,

                              Dave Matthews Band 8/15

18. Washington, D.C. (15)    Coldplay 8/3, Eagles 7/26, Pearl Jam 6/22

19. Miami            (11)    Dave Matthews Band 7/12, Pearl Jam 6/11,

                              Dave Matthews Band 7/11

20. Cleveland      (N/A)    Kenny Chesney 5/24, Radiohead 8/4,

                              Jonas Brothers 8/22

*Data based on sales through StubHub as of 8/07/08

 

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Cincinnati has had almost all of the concerts on that list too, with a few exceptions of course. I know we've had Jimmy Buffett, Dave Matthews Band, Tom Petty, Kenny Chesney, Jonas Brothers...no Radiohead, Pearl Jam, or Coldplay though.

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Flawed is right :wtf:

 

Nissan Pavilion is outside of DC (considered in the DC market)

 

Richmond, Virginia took the biggest leap in this year's rankings moving up from number 17 in 2007 to number 9 in 2008. The live concert ticket market in the area was bolstered by performances from Jimmy Buffett, Radiohead, Bruce Springsteen, Jonas Brothers and Dave Matthews Band -- the majority of which took place at Nissan Pavilion. Many fans from surrounding areas traveled to Richmond to see these bands since they did not schedule performances in Washington, D.C.

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it it were the most ro

Hmmm, so the biggest cities have the most ticket sales [edit] through Stubhub.

if it were the most rockin' in the figurative sense, then I am sure Houston would be #1 (or at least top 5)

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Flawed is right :wtf:

 

Nissan Pavilion is outside of DC (considered in the DC market)

 

Richmond, Virginia took the biggest leap in this year's rankings moving up from number 17 in 2007 to number 9 in 2008. The live concert ticket market in the area was bolstered by performances from Jimmy Buffett, Radiohead, Bruce Springsteen, Jonas Brothers and Dave Matthews Band -- the majority of which took place at Nissan Pavilion. Many fans from surrounding areas traveled to Richmond to see these bands since they did not schedule performances in Washington, D.C.

 

to that i can add springsteen actually got his start in richmond. its his oldest fan base outside of the jersey shore. kind of surprising to many people, but he is still huge around there.

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StubHub FanStats(SM) -- StubHub Reveals the Hottest NFL Home Openers

World's Largest Ticket Marketplace Identifies Most Coveted Match-Ups by Average Ticket Price

 

Last update: 4:25 p.m. EDT Sept. 3, 2008

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, Sep 03, 2008 (MARKET WIRE via COMTEX) -- The 2008 National Football League season kicks off Thursday when the reigning Super Bowl Champion New York Giants host the Washington Redskins at the Meadowlands. Giants fans unable to score tickets from the box office have instead turned to online marketplace StubHub, paying on average $301 per ticket to watch their team take the first step at defending its NFL championship. StubHub, the world's largest ticket marketplace, has released its 2008 edition of Top 10 NFL Season Openers, ranking Redskins-Giants #2, based on average ticket selling price, a reliable indicator of fan demand.

 

...

 

Match-up   Date   Avg. Price 2007 Ranking

------ ---------- ------------

1. Green Bay Packers (vs. Vikings) 9/8   $ 355   3

2. New York Giants (vs. Redskins)   9/4   $ 301   2

3. New York Jets (vs. Patriots)   9/14   $ 261   8

4. Indianapolis Colts (vs. Bears) 9/7   $ 253 10

5. Chicago Bears (vs. Buccaneers) 9/21   $ 235   1

6. Pittsburgh Steelers (vs. Texans)   9/7   $ 235   7

7. New England Patriots (vs. Chiefs) 9/7   $ 188   6

8. Cleveland Browns (vs. Cowboys) 9/7   $ 183 NR

9. Philadelphia Eagles (vs. Rams) 9/7   $ 180   4

10. Dallas Cowboys (vs. Eagles)   9/15 $ 177 NR

Source: Sales ranking (as of 9/02/08) based on average ticket price for

each game sold on StubHub.com, with a minimum of 1000 tickets sold per game

to qualify.

 

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Outside Magazine, August 2009

 

Best Towns 2009

America's Best Cities

Healthy. That's the word we kept coming back to. And we don’t mean a fit or skinny population; we’re talking about a city’s cultural vibrancy, economic well-being, and overall quality of life. Presenting our picks for the 10 best cities in America.

 

 

Click on link for more information.

 

10.Charlotte, North Carolina

9.Cincinnati, Ohio

8.Minneapolis, Minnesota

7.Portland, Oregon

6.Albuquerque, New Mexico

5.Boston, Massachusetts

4.Austin, Texas

3.Atlanta, Georgia

2.Seattle, Washington

1.Colorado Springs, Colorado

PLUS: Our 10 favorite small towns

 

http://outside.away.com/outside/destinations/200908/best-towns-america-intro.html?imw=Y

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^ I'll take that first picture to describe Cincinnati's economy. 

 

With its low cost of living and resilient and well-balanced blend of industries (everything from aerospace to advertising), Cincinnati topped our charts for best economy.

 

Edit: Yellow Springs also made their list of top 10 small towns.

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^ I'll take that first picture to describe Cincinnati's economy. 

 

With its low cost of living and resilient and well-balanced blend of industries (everything from aerospace to advertising), Cincinnati topped our charts for best economy.

 

No...more like this list is a load of...

 

BSbutton.jpg

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Believe now I know these lists are just like the picture above, a pile of $hit. I lived in Colorado Springs for 18 years and you would be hard pressed to even call this place a city. The Springs has absolutely NO culture, diversity, neighborhoods, entertainment, great restaurants, exciting and fun people, architecture or urban anything. If you like a little outdoor activity, western typ art, and looking at Pikes Peak day after day, and living amongst some of the 100+ Evangelical Christian groups that are based there and dictate local politics then you will ove this place, otherwise it's a complete DUD of a town. Whoever put this list together is insane, blind, corrupt and incompetent and these must be their good points.

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I actually thought this list was just fine. Outside magazine is for people who like to camp, fish, hike, paddle, etc. So they had to overlay that onto cities that could offer a balance of culture and affordability. All of these cities are gateways to a lot of outdoor activities by virtue of being close to some kind of mountain or hill range, with active rivers and protected forests. Although I don't understand why Colorado Springs was there instead of Denver.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Honestly, this list would make some sense if f$&king Colorado Springs weren't on top!!

 

Minneapolis and Cincinnati? Fair enough, they have rock-solid, depression-proof economies. Also decent populations of college grads by Midwestern standards.

 

Austin? Ridiculous music scene, some very innovative alternative rock throughout the years, strong nightlife, indie film scene, booming economy, makes sense.

 

Atlanta? Good economy, low unemployment. Loads of hip-hop (much of it garbage, but it produced Outkast).

 

Portland? Kind of a give in. It's a Pacific Northwest paradise and a beautiful, pedestrian-friendly city. Everyone loves it when they visit, even conservatives.

 

Seattle? Much sh!ttier weather than Portland, but a strong music scene, very urban, techie/yuppie paradise, beautiful if the sun comes out.

 

Boston? Duh. The hub of New England, solid economy, highly-educated, great history and the buildings/density to back up that history.

 

Charlotte? Total sh!thole, but it's always being bailed out, so the economy is much better than it should be. Also known as an easy place for college grads to find jobs, particularly college grads from Ohio.

 

Albuquerque? What the hell? It's in the middle of nowhere and uglier than sh!t, not to mention basically no historical housing or good architecture to speak of. It gets points for being a Latino hub though.

 

Colorado Springs? Ah, you've got to be sh!tting me...

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Honestly, this list would make some sense if f$&king Colorado Springs weren't on top!!

 

Minneapolis and Cincinnati? Fair enough, they have rock-solid, depression-proof economies. Also decent populations of college grads by Midwestern standards.

 

Austin? Ridiculous music scene, some very innovative alternative rock throughout the years, strong nightlife, indie film scene, booming economy, makes sense.

 

Atlanta? Good economy, low unemployment. Loads of hip-hop (much of it garbage, but it produced Outkast).

 

Portland? Kind of a give in. It's a Pacific Northwest paradise and a beautiful, pedestrian-friendly city. Everyone loves it when they visit, even conservatives.

 

Seattle? Much sh!ttier weather than Portland, but a strong music scene, very urban, techie/yuppie paradise, beautiful if the sun comes out.

 

Boston? Duh. The hub of New England, solid economy, highly-educated, great history and the buildings/density to back up that history.

 

Charlotte? Total sh!thole, but it's always being bailed out, so the economy is much better than it should be. Also known as an easy place for college grads to find jobs, particularly college grads from Ohio.

 

Albuquerque? What the hell? It's in the middle of nowhere and uglier than sh!t, not to mention basically no historical housing or good architecture to speak of. It gets points for being a Latino hub though.

 

Colorado Springs? Ah, you've got to be sh!tting me...

 

Er...it's a list of the best large cities for people who like to do outdoorsy-things. Not a generic list of the best cities.

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^Yeah, but then why Minneapolis, Boston, and Cincy on a list with Portland? It seems like they killed their own argument in terms of "outdoorsy." Half the cities are in areas with average outdoor recreation.

 

It there appears to be one trump card they used, it's economy. The list does look pretty generic and predictable. All these cities have good economies and lots of college grads.

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Actually, Minneapolis is a very large, outdoor-sy city and Boston has plenty of recreational options within a half-hours drive.

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^I guess I forgot about the coast near Boston. Even then, Portland still probably wins. It's got Mount Hood. And where's Chicago with Lake Michigan and their smugness and sense of Midwestern superiority? Or hell, Buffalo is near lots of great things. Why don't they get any love from the media? They've got Lake Erie, Niagara River/Falls, Letchworth, etc. Though I guess no one is going to put Buffalo on a top ten list for anything. It is a more ghetto, more abandoned Toledo, and I think even the economy might be worse, which is saying a lot.

 

And while Minneapolis is known for being outdoorsy, the extra cold ass winters make the lower Great Lakes look like a tropical paradise, and I think Duluth wins in terms of outdoorsy. Minneapolis has a ridiculously good economy and is a nice city, don't get me wrong, but I think their claims on how much outdoor recreation they have are largely the result of great PR and a functioning tourism bureau.

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Boston is definitely an outdoors city - beaches, hiking, camping, biking, boating, kayaking.... I think anyone who has lived there (myself included) would support that it belongs on the list.

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These articles mean nothing to me...  Stats and criteria can be tweaked, manipulated...and a lot based on what someone else's idea of a great place is. As I mentioned in another similar discussion... as for 'nightlife'...Who monopolized the definition of these word? Who carved in stone that such must be associated with, and limited to bars/clubs for twits and 20 somethings? When you evolve and broaden your interests in life...that scene becomes irreverent...and attractive to what is really a minority.. many get tired of it, grow up...leave it..and then ask.. "What's next in life?" I am 41...and if I am still frequenting this scene on a regular basis... I think.. "OMG! Haven't I broadened my horizons and interests..and created/discovered new ways to spend time?".. But that's just me....

 

I can think of a dozen other creative things to do than slurp alcohol all night..or stand around holding a bottle, and believe me.. I did plenty. Again, that's me, though..and many others likely feel the same.....in which case a place boasting that scene does nothing for me or that crowd. I'd rather sit on the roof and observe the heavens with my telescope... Have a special person over too.. A city must appeal to other very important age groups so it doesn't become the "tried it... and now bored with it...So what's next?, scene"

 

Don't get me wrong...there are many great places on that list. I guess what deems 'great' depends upon the person gathering the information, what criteria they chose to use, etc.

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This is only 2 hours from Cincinnati:

RedRiverGorge.jpg

 

And this is only 2 hours from Boston:

18162595.jpg

 

And while nearly everyone in Minnesota has a cabin somewhere on some lake, there are even severe land formations within 2 hours of Minneapolis:

3252489.jpg

 

Here is the most interesting landscape I can drive to in 2 hours in Orlando, the third highest peak in all of Florida:

sugar_mtn.jpg

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Great photos!!... Every place has its beautiful eco-region. Even here, we are no exception, and I feel often underrated, and hence the lack of involvement in helping to promote propper stewardship of what we have ("we only save what we love...and we only love what we know!").

 

Anyway, I plan on creating a thread to showcase some of N.E. Ohio's beauty and wonderful such places within a couple hours more or less.... You just might be surprised.

 

But sadly about Florida... I used to live there in 1973 and most of the natural beauty that was there when I was there...is not rooftop crops. It is sprawling out of control. Even Disney lost its nice buffer zone, that Walt actually wanted to maintain, I believe.

 

 

Here is something less than two hours from Cincinnati..  www.highlandssanctuary.org They call it "woodland sprawl!" :-)

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This is only 2 hours from Cincinnati:

 

See, this is too far for me to consider being part of the metro area at all. I think the cutoff should be at the MSA level for mid-size and large cities, or around 1 hour's drive. Sure every place has attractions beyond that, but how regularly will people use them? It's all about proximity. Two hours is not good proximity and it's stretching for a daytrip, not to mention that's some serious gas costs. In my Pontiac Vibe, I'd rip through a whole tank of gas. That's about $35. Sorry, but that's a ton of money and could buy me a hooker on Cherry Street.

 

That's why I'd argue Portland has a pretty big trump card (say 10,000 feet) over most other places.

 

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I can think of a dozen other creative things to do than slurp alcohol all night..or stand around holding a bottle, and believe me.. I did plenty.

 

I think bars get old in a week (I've always greatly preferred house parties, which rarely exist after college). The thing is, the bar is still sadly one of the best places to meet single people (though generally trashy single people). Bars are a big part of American society, and in many cities, it goes beyond the 20-something crowd.

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I can think of a dozen other creative things to do than slurp alcohol all night..or stand around holding a bottle, and believe me.. I did plenty.

 

I think bars get old in a week (I've always greatly preferred house parties, which rarely exist after college). The thing is, the bar is still sadly one of the best places to meet single people (though generally trashy single people). Bars are a big part of American society, and in many cities, it goes beyond the 20-something crowd.

 

Why do you speak in such general terms??  Why couldn't you say, "I've always greatly preferred house parties, which rarely where I live." or "I've always greatly preferred house parties, which rarely exist after college in my experience."

 

Because based on my experience that statement is bupkis!

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This is only 2 hours from Cincinnati:

 

See, this is too far for me to consider being part of the metro area at all. I think the cutoff should be at the MSA level for mid-size and large cities, or around 1 hour's drive. Sure every place has attractions beyond that, but how regularly will people use them? It's all about proximity. Two hours is not good proximity and it's stretching for a daytrip, not to mention that's some serious gas costs. In my Pontiac Vibe, I'd rip through a whole tank of gas. That's about $35. Sorry, but that's a ton of money and could buy me a hooker on Cherry Street.

 

That's why I'd argue Portland has a pretty big trump card (say 10,000 feet) over most other places.

 

 

I don't know about that.  New York City heavily uses the Adirondacks and they are more than 2 hours from The City.  San Francisco uses Reno/Lake Tahoe like a Thai hooker on the weekends and that's a 2+ hour drive.  Same with the Carolina Crescent with the Smokies, etc.  2 hours is reasonable to be "included" in a metropolitan area's "natural beauty."  I mean, really, Portland ain't got shit on Seattle (Mount Rainier, Olympic Rainforest, the Sound, the deserts of central Washington, Mount Adams, blah blah) or even Los Angeles.

 

I personally can see why Colorado Springs got listed ahead of Denver (Garden of the Gods, Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, all right next door; not 20 minutes away like Denver) but to place it over places like Seattle, Salt Lake City, Honolulu, or Los Angeles is kind-of suspect.

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^I still love that picture. It looks like it has motion blur now. It was a joke. I do in fact live in an area with fairly strict noise ordinances, and it's a huge problem. It's like night and day compared to Harvard on the Hocking (obviously, I was speaking from experience).

 

Good cities allow people to party. It's good for the alcohol business, which is going to be America's backbone here pretty soon. :wink:

 

We'll probably start seeing "Best Cities to Get Drunk and Forget We're in a Depression" lists...

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This is only 2 hours from Cincinnati:

 

See, this is too far for me to consider being part of the metro area at all. I think the cutoff should be at the MSA level for mid-size and large cities, or around 1 hour's drive. Sure every place has attractions beyond that, but how regularly will people use them? It's all about proximity. Two hours is not good proximity and it's stretching for a daytrip, not to mention that's some serious gas costs. In my Pontiac Vibe, I'd rip through a whole tank of gas. That's about $35. Sorry, but that's a ton of money and could buy me a hooker on Cherry Street.

 

That's why I'd argue Portland has a pretty big trump card (say 10,000 feet) over most other places.

 

 

I don't know about that.  New York City heavily uses the Adirondacks and they are more than 2 hours from The City.  San Francisco uses Reno/Lake Tahoe like a Thai hooker on the weekends and that's a 2+ hour drive.  Same with the Carolina Crescent with the Smokies, etc.  2 hours is reasonable to be "included" in a metropolitan area's "natural beauty."  I mean, really, Portland ain't got sh!t on Seattle (Mount Rainier, Olympic Rainforest, the Sound, the deserts of central Washington, Mount Adams, blah blah) or even Los Angeles.

 

I personally can see why Colorado Springs got listed ahead of Denver (Garden of the Gods, Pikes Peak, Manitou Springs, all right next door; not 20 minutes away like Denver) but to place it over places like Seattle, Salt Lake City, Honolulu, or Los Angeles is kind-of suspect.

 

I'm not saying stuff at two hours drive isn't a big plus, I just think in terms of average usage, stuff within one hour will see more substantial patronage from its nearest city. It probably also will catch a wider range of incomes. I bet the further you go, the wealthier the patrons (because more overnight stays, gas use, etc.). I'm not familiar at all with Tahoe, but I bet there's more rich people there than say, at Put-in-Bay.

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