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The Official *I Love Cleveland* Thread

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Yes, Cleveland really does rock

 

There is no stopping the tide. Cleveland’s once gritty industrial landscape lost its manufacturing base years ago, and people left town. Today, they’re moving back home. Generation Y and millennials are charging up their own economic engine. High-tech jobs, world-class health facilities, and a revived cultural scene are giving this once Rust Belt city an exciting new look.

 

There’s a newfound optimism and local pride, a can-do attitude. The city will host the Republican National Convention next year, and they’re still celebrating the return of basketball superstar LeBron James. (His “Second Coming” homecoming banner is back up on the side of the Cavaliers’ stadium).

 

But it’s more than LeBron and the GOP. Clevelanders are rejoicing in their own homecoming. They see their city as a vibrant, future-forward metropolis making the most of its new found stature.

 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/travel/2015/03/21/cleveland-rocks-city-makes-comeback/vjYMflq7YdCoffMNJraG3H/story.html

 

After today's story from a certain sports reporter from the Globe about Cleveland, I went back to look at this article and noticed that it has since been removed "because the reporting practices did not meet Globe standards."

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After today's story from a certain sports reporter from the Globe about Cleveland, I went back to look at this article and noticed that it has since been removed "because the reporting practices did not meet Globe standards."

 

What did it say that was so bad? Is it cached somewhere? Who is the author--I can try to find a cached version.

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^ boarded up downtown, we have nothing but our hope for our basketball team, economy runs on lottery tickets, horsehoe casino is atlantic city on the Cuyahoga.  His points don't even make sense, what the hell is wrong with a $3.00 PBR at Flannerys?  Plesae disregard all the $6.00 beers that we make in our city are better than anything in the state of Massachusetts.  PBR is a drinkable cheap beer, I don't understand.

 

Look, im all about sharing an opinion.  Maybe he says, "Cleveland is still working on its revitalization and still has more room to go, but progress is noticeable" or even " you don't have to go far to see where issues exist in Cleveland".  That seems like an objective opinion (even if you don't want to talk about the successes).  But this is just plain lazy pot shots. There is not an ounce of research, investigation or questioning going on to elaborate on anything he wrote.

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^ That's regarding the article that was posted today which can be found here: https://www.bostonglobe.com/sports/2015/04/20/cavaliers-are-cleveland-best-and-only-hope-for-title/msYnc9rGbHpZndaA1mnrNO/story.html.

 

As for the previous article from a few weeks back:

 

After today's story from a certain sports reporter from the Globe about Cleveland, I went back to look at this article and noticed that it has since been removed "because the reporting practices did not meet Globe standards."

 

What did it say that was so bad? Is it cached somewhere? Who is the author--I can try to find a cached version.

 

There were just a lot of inaccuracies in it, as were mentioned on this thread a couple pages back. Here are just a couple examples:

 

"The city’s free trolley service operates daily and can drop you off at the Sweet Moses Soda Fountain and Treat Shop for classic sundaes with its own homemade ice cream."

 

"The Cle (as the locals say) has always been a cultural powerhouse, financed by the city’s pioneering industrialists — John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie — who spent lavishly to give it treasures for the ages."

 

I'm glad to hear that RTA extended the trolley system to Detroit-Shoreway and that Andrew Carnegie was actually from Cleveland and not Pittsburgh like I had mistakenly always believed...

 

 

 

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While it did have some gross inaccuracies it does seem shady that rather than correct the issues they pulled the positive article about CLE at the same time that this article totally ripping the city was published.  Guess they changed their minds about "Cleveland Rocking" once LeBron rocked the Celtics.

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In more happy news...positive press from Forbes...FORBES!!!

 

Great Urban Weekend Escapes: Cleveland

 

By Larry Olmsted

Contributor

 

LeBron James isn’t the only one suddenly rediscovering Cleveland these days. Increasingly it’s showing up on various hot lists for cities, attractions and dining, while enjoying a Downtown renaissance. Landing the 2016 Republican National Convention anchors a slew of additional urban redevelopment and new hotels, while a surprisingly impressive slate of tourist attractions already draw visitors. Ohio’s prodigal NBA son is only one example of what is known locally as the “Cleveland Boomerang,” with many once displaced natives returning home, lured by the combination of dramatic quality of life improvements and low cost of living.

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/larryolmsted/2015/04/21/great-urban-weekend-escapes-cleveland-oh/

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First off, I think the author of that article should be sanctioned in some way.  A lot of it seemed like an attack against poor people generally, which is gross.

 

Although one point he raised, about evenings and weekends, is one that has been discussed here in the last couple days.  I've encountered the same (strong) opinion myself from visitors who were otherwise impressed with the city.  Too much of our downtown is only open for weekday lunches.  It isn't possible to have full-scale evening and weekend streetlife unless the businesses along those streets are willing to play their part in it.  I recall this being one of the major planks of Philadelphia's plan to rejuvenate their own downtown... lights must be on and doors must be open when people expect them to be.

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While it did have some gross inaccuracies it does seem shady that rather than correct the issues they pulled the positive article about CLE at the same time that this article totally ripping the city was published.  Guess they changed their minds about "Cleveland Rocking" once LeBron rocked the Celtics.

 

Well, to be fair, I only just noticed it today. It may have been taken down days/weeks ago. I don't know.

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His article does not at all reflect what's happening in Cleveland.  He should read the recent article from the Boston Globe that wrote about Cleveland being a great city to visit with much to see and do.  Very bizarre and cheap article by Shaughnessy but the bottom line is it really doesn't matter what he thinks.

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America’s Best Cities for Sweet Tooths

 

http://www.travelandleisure.com/slideshows/americas-best-cities-sweets-desserts/9

 

No. 9 Cleveland 

The Rust Belt city gets to have it both ways, ranking in the top 10 for both old-style bakeries and cool bars.  Playing to the city’s heartland mojo, vintage-inspired soda fountain Sweet Moses, in the Gordon Square Arts District, specializes in house-made root beer and pharmacy-style phosphates and egg creams.

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How many mentions (and even a link to) the Hastily Made Cleveland Tourism video can you spot in the comments?  Thanks, Mike Polk.

 

Mike Polk deserves every douchebag WTAM listener in his fandom.  May they forever suffer in the boredom of Khaki pants, fat wives and exurbia. 

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How many mentions (and even a link to) the Hastily Made Cleveland Tourism video can you spot in the comments?  Thanks, Mike Polk.

 

I've said this before:  he's the anti-Drew.  He's today's equivalent of the "comedy" writers from here who went to LA and started writing Cleveland jokes.

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I never understood "come and see both of our buildings" ignoring the existence of Terminal Tower. 

 

Saw him do standup once, most of it was about how people at Walmart are trashy.  It came off mean-spirited so I've never been a big fan.  I prefer the punching-upward style of humor.

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First off, I think the author of that article should be sanctioned in some way.  A lot of it seemed like an attack against poor people generally, which is gross.

 

Although one point he raised, about evenings and weekends, is one that has been discussed here in the last couple days.  I've encountered the same (strong) opinion myself from visitors who were otherwise impressed with the city.  Too much of our downtown is only open for weekday lunches.  It isn't possible to have full-scale evening and weekend streetlife unless the businesses along those streets are willing to play their part in it.  I recall this being one of the major planks of Philadelphia's plan to rejuvenate their own downtown... lights must be on and doors must be open when people expect them to be.

 

I agree.  Yes, despite the tremendous growth we've experienced downtown in recent years, there are times, esp some weeknights and on Sundays, where entire blocks are empty along Euclid and Prospect while most E. 4th St. restaurants are chairs up.  (It's interesting to note that Ohio City, esp. Market Sq, often seems to have a more 24/7 presence than downtown).  But we know that as it gets warmer, activity will intensify -- as for Friday and Saturday nights, Shaughnessy is nuts, because downtown street life is very vibrant...  No downtown Cleveland is not comparable to Boston -- but how many cities are -- we still more than hold our own.

 

But to belittle working families, particularly his stupid casino comments, was despicable and, even though I hate it when Clevelanders are too thin-skinned at the usual river-burning ribbing, this article merited a rebuttal -- I applaud Armond Budish and others for responding.  To me, Shaughnessy's haughty, condescending mindset is parallel to (despicable) ESPN's disgraced Brit McHenry's.   

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Boston writer Dan Shaughnessy misses mark about Cleveland

By George M. Thomas

Beacon Journal sports writer

published: April 21, 2015 - 02:07 PM | Updated: April 22, 2015 - 09:41 AM

 

I’ve never met Dan Shaughnessy. I believe I have seen him milling about Quicken Loans Arena.

I recognize him, but I suspect he won’t want much of Northeast Ohio to do so, given the column he wrote in the Boston Globe that essentially makes the area sound as if it’s filled with a bunch of desperate mongrels howling for scraps.

In essence, Shaughnessy wrote that Cleveland, and by osmosis Northeast Ohio, has been suffering since Moses returned from Mount Sinai.

“They come downtown and they see a diminished city where commerce and activity once thrived, before the foreclosures and rampant unemployment,” he wrote.

 

He went on to say that “LeBron and the Cavaliers are important because Cleveland is dead or dying, and there hasn’t been a team to make the city feel good about itself since Lyndon Baines Johnson was in the White House.”

 

http://www.ohio.com/sports/cavs/boston-writer-dan-shaughnessy-misses-mark-about-cleveland-1.585171

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I agree.  Yes, despite the tremendous growth we've experienced downtown in recent years, there are times, esp some weeknights and on Sundays, where entire blocks are empty along Euclid and Prospect while most E. 4th St. restaurants are chairs up.  (It's interesting to note that Ohio City, esp. Market Sq, often seems to have a more 24/7 presence than downtown).  But we know that as it gets warmer, activity will intensify -- as for Friday and Saturday nights, Shaughnessy is nuts, because downtown street life is very vibrant...  No downtown Cleveland is not comparable to Boston -- but how many cities are -- we still more than hold our own.

 

Downtown Boston proper isn't exactly bumping at 8 pm on a Tuesday, either.  It's a CBD like any other.

 

^what do you expect? People in Boston are so arrogant and provincial at the same time.

 

+ 1,000,000.  It's such a frustrating combination

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^You may be right... I can't speak with total authority on downtown Boston on weeknights  these days -- my aunt, who lived in Back Bay, sadly passed a decade ago... I've since then been to Beantown once 3.5 years ago, but it was on the weekend, and the sidewalks were packed (there are times when Boston feels like a mini-Manhattan, esp with all the density, heavy foot traffic, and the old-school T-subway system) esp in the Newbury Street-Copley Square area with all the trendy shops, restaurants and 19th Century brownstone apartments... One thing that's very weird in Boston, even on weekends, is that the streets totally empty out by 11-11:30p; the restaurants and bars shutter and downtown literally becomes a ghost town.  And Sunday morning in downtown Boston, much like in downtown Cleveland, is pretty quiet (although ours is quiet-er, except on Browns' Sundays) ... But on weekend nights, Downtown Cleveland at least keeps things lively until 12:30-1p ... with some joints over in the WHD going strong even till 3p -- like Panini's IIRC.

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Cleveland's downtown is CBD where businesses operate during normal business hours so it is not surprising that if you stroll from W. 6th to E. 9th onthe weekend that you find very little going on unless there is a sporting event or something bringing non-residents downtown. Neighborhoods of downtown Cleveland, most notably Tremont and Ohio City, are more residential with more restaurants and retail and therefore have a more lively vibe on weekends and during non-work hours. This is consistent with any larger city in the US with only a few exceptions (most notably mid-town NYC, a CBD but also residential and a tourist attraction).

 

That said, I am surprised how dead the warehouse district is on weekends during the day. For the population density in those couple blocks, you would think that there would be more people out and about. I attribute this to a few things:

 

1) Weather - pretty self explanatory. People don't want to be outside if it's freezing or raining.

 

2) Living space per person - this is interesting and perhaps explains why even when it's nice weather, you don't see hoards of people congregating outside in the Warehouse District. Even with the rent increases over the past several years, it is still extremely affordable to live in downtown Cleveland relative to other cities with a downtown residential. Market rents are on average $1.30 psf per month and are still only $2 psf at the very high end (the 9, Fl EB, etc). At these prices, 2 young professionals can afford to live in a 1,500 sf double with a sizable common areas to entertain, central air and in some cases outdoor balconies! If you are a little short on cash but still want to hang out with your friends, you can comfortably host 10 people rather than meeting up somewhere. This is not a reality in larger cities. I hypothesize that the livability and affordability of our downtown residential actually detracts from the downtown vibe.

 

3) Concentration in Warehouse District - With so many people living in the same 2 buildings that are essentially connected (Bingham/Bridgeview) or within 100 yards of those, there isn't a whole lot of need to make plans with your fellow downtowner to meet in a common middle ground to catch-up over dinner/drinks or hang-out and day drink on the weekend. You just walk down the hall and take an elevator from unit 610 to unit 1201 within the Bridgeview.

 

Would love to hear other people's thoughts on this.

 

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^ One correction, Tremont and Ohio City are not part of "downtown." When talking about more active "neighborhoods" of downtown, I'd say look to Gateway (including E 4th) and the Warehouse District.

 

As a resident of the Warehouse District, I'll speak to your point about lack of activity on the weekends. I don't often find myself out and about the WHD because I don't really like the WHD. Specifically, it is not a very enjoyable place to walk around or hang out because of all the surface parking lots. Besides W 6th between Lakeside and St. Clair, the neighborhood is not at all intimate. Whenever I leave my apartment, I find myself headed to other parts of downtown, Ohio City, UC, Tremont, etc.

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Quite true on Tremont/Ohio City not being part of downtown proper. Just trying to differentiate between areas that are more closer town city center versus further out but still part of Cleveland the city. For example, University Circle is not consistent with what I was considering as reasonably near downtown to be part of the discussion.

 

I have to agree that the surface lots across from Naughty Mermaid and the like are an eyesore and so is the one across from Chop. Although there is not a surface lot on West 6th between Lake and St. Clair, I cannot go as far as calling it intimate.

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^ One correction, Tremont and Ohio City are not part of "downtown." When talking about more active "neighborhoods" of downtown, I'd say look to Gateway (including E 4th) and the Warehouse District.

 

As a resident of the Warehouse District, I'll speak to your point about lack of activity on the weekends. I don't often find myself out and about the WHD because I don't really like the WHD. Specifically, it is not a very enjoyable place to walk around or hang out because of all the surface parking lots. Besides W 6th between Lakeside and St. Clair, the neighborhood is not at all intimate. Whenever I leave my apartment, I find myself headed to other parts of downtown, Ohio City, UC, Tremont, etc.

 

... by foot? trolley? HL? Rapid? or (egad) automobile?... just curious....

 

btw, I share your pain about the WHD's open space/surface lots.  As a non-WHD resident, I have hoped upon hope this area would see some kind of major infill project to fill those (many) voids (including the infamous 'hole' on Public Square), but alas, downtown priorties are currently centered on Gateway, the Flats and Civic Center districts -- all of which, ironically, have considerably less surface parking area viz-a-viz their buildnig densities than does the WHD... So it goes.

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^I certainly consider Back Bay in downtown Boston ... If we consider CSU part of our downtown, then Back Bay makes an even stronger case for being within theirs.  We're used to having office buildings and no people living in downtown, but East Coast Colonial cities (as well as Chicago and San Fran further west) have, for more than a century, at least, had residential neighborhoods considered downtown...

 

The ONLY reason I wouldn't necessarily consider Ohio City or Tremont downtown is the huge gulf the river and Flats area create physically separating them from the CBD.  However, I've heard some planners and others, in recent years, refer to Ohio City as downtown.  This is no doubt driven by OC's strong growth as a restaurant/retail district that happens to be nearby, and with it's strong bridge and superior mass transit connection to our Public Square downtown core, I can see an argument for this thinking ... just sayin'...

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Cleveland Play House wins coveted 2015 Regional Theatre Tony Award in its 100th year

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The Cleveland Play House, America's first regional theater, which will celebrate its centennial season this year, has won the 2015 Regional Theatre Tony Award, one of the most prestigious and coveted honors in the entertainment industry.

 

The announcement was made Friday by the Tony Awards Administrative Committee. The group selected the downtown Play House for the accolade based on a recommendation of the American Theatre Critics Association.

 

"This is extraordinary for this company and for this community," said Play House managing director Kevin Moore. "I think about the 100 years of plays and people, the artists and theatergoers. This company is astounding."

 

http://www.cleveland.com/onstage/index.ssf/2015/04/cleveland_play_house_wins_cove.html#incart_m-rpt-1

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Another view....

 

Cleveland needs a thicker skin

Blog Entry: April 26, 2015 4:30 AM    |    Author: JOHN CAMPANELLI

 

Last week, Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy, in town for the Cavs-Celtics series, turned his watch back 40 years and wrote a column bashing Cleveland. You might have heard about it.

 

“Downtown Cleveland is a sad space with many vacant buildings and boarded-up stores.”

 

“It feels like the local economy runs on lottery tickets.”

 

“Horseshoe Casino ... it's not Ocean's Eleven. It's more like Atlantic City-on-the-Cuyahoga.”

 

All that was missing was a rehash of the “what's the difference between Cleveland and the Titanic?” joke. (Answer: Cleveland's orchestra is better.)

 

After reading the piece, I felt sick.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150426/BLOGS08/304269984/cleveland-needs-a-thicker-skin


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Another view....

 

Cleveland needs a thicker skin

Blog Entry: April 26, 2015 4:30 AM    |    Author: JOHN CAMPANELLI

 

Last week, Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy, in town for the Cavs-Celtics series, turned his watch back 40 years and wrote a column bashing Cleveland. You might have heard about it.

 

“Downtown Cleveland is a sad space with many vacant buildings and boarded-up stores.”

 

“It feels like the local economy runs on lottery tickets.”

 

“Horseshoe Casino ... it's not Ocean's Eleven. It's more like Atlantic City-on-the-Cuyahoga.”

 

All that was missing was a rehash of the “what's the difference between Cleveland and the Titanic?” joke. (Answer: Cleveland's orchestra is better.)

 

After reading the piece, I felt sick.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150426/BLOGS08/304269984/cleveland-needs-a-thicker-skin

 

Twenty-five years ago when I was at Ohio State, a preacher named Brother Jed would set up shop on the Oval on sunny spring days and shout at sinner students as they walked past. Sometimes a kid would stop and try to debate the guy, but it was pointless.

 

Brother Jed used to say the words "Devil" and "Hell" in a kind of long and drawn out, Roy Orbison manner, the likes of which I have not heard since.

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I get the gist of the article and I largely agree.  But there is something to be said for setting the record straight.  Slander unchecked can be adopted as fact if met with silence, and that happens a lot when people talk about Cleveland.  So yes, we do have a lot of legitimate reasons to be silently confident (and more everyday) but there is some utility in loudly proclaiming the facts.  And the facts favor the vibrancy of Downtown and do not support the lotto-ticket wasteland bullsh*t.  Perception influences people's choices and if we want to be on the right side of perception, we may have to work a little to make our case.

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I like and agree with the article but even like and agree with sixth city s response even more.  We do need to get to a point where we just don't care what other places think. Portland Oregon usually gets cracked as the inferior little brother of the west coast, but the general mentality is they don't care, if you don't like it, beat it. Now they have a much different history than us and we are trying to grow so we don't want people to beat it, but I agree silent confidence does have legs in getting approval.

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but whining from the masses over a sports column isn't doing the city any favors.

 

Amen.  Hold your heads high Cleveland.  The Celtics are swept.  He can right his trashy column about the Red Sox now.

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but whining from the masses over a sports column isn't doing the city any favors.

 

Agreed.  The more the Cavs win the more angry sports writers will trot out old lines about Cleveland.  It's the nature of sports and the trash talking that will ensue between cities.  In our case it's just particularly sensitive because we've historically been the brunt of not-so-fun natured trash talk about our city, and we're working hard to change perceptions right now.  Just wait until Chicago's Joekim Noah comes back to town... :drunk:

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Forbes gives love to a resurgent Cleveland. Read up for why you should visit! #ThisisCLE http://t.co/AYlYwWefK5


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Another view....

 

Cleveland needs a thicker skin

Blog Entry: April 26, 2015 4:30 AM    |    Author: JOHN CAMPANELLI

 

Last week, Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy, in town for the Cavs-Celtics series, turned his watch back 40 years and wrote a column bashing Cleveland. You might have heard about it.

 

“Downtown Cleveland is a sad space with many vacant buildings and boarded-up stores.”

 

“It feels like the local economy runs on lottery tickets.”

 

“Horseshoe Casino ... it's not Ocean's Eleven. It's more like Atlantic City-on-the-Cuyahoga.”

 

All that was missing was a rehash of the “what's the difference between Cleveland and the Titanic?” joke. (Answer: Cleveland's orchestra is better.)

 

After reading the piece, I felt sick.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150426/BLOGS08/304269984/cleveland-needs-a-thicker-skin

 

Twenty-five years ago when I was at Ohio State, a preacher named Brother Jed would set up shop on the Oval on sunny spring days and shout at sinner students as they walked past. Sometimes a kid would stop and try to debate the guy, but it was pointless.

 

Brother Jed used to say the words "Devil" and "Hell" in a kind of long and drawn out, Roy Orbison manner, the likes of which I have not heard since.

 

oh yeah i remember him. not just osu -- he traveled around many college campuses doing that schtick with his wife sister cindy (or waifu? not sure relationship there ha) for many years. they sure took a lot of abuse.

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Another view....

 

Cleveland needs a thicker skin

Blog Entry: April 26, 2015 4:30 AM    |    Author: JOHN CAMPANELLI

 

Last week, Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy, in town for the Cavs-Celtics series, turned his watch back 40 years and wrote a column bashing Cleveland. You might have heard about it.

 

“Downtown Cleveland is a sad space with many vacant buildings and boarded-up stores.”

 

“It feels like the local economy runs on lottery tickets.”

 

“Horseshoe Casino ... it's not Ocean's Eleven. It's more like Atlantic City-on-the-Cuyahoga.”

 

All that was missing was a rehash of the “what's the difference between Cleveland and the Titanic?” joke. (Answer: Cleveland's orchestra is better.)

 

After reading the piece, I felt sick.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150426/BLOGS08/304269984/cleveland-needs-a-thicker-skin

 

Twenty-five years ago when I was at Ohio State, a preacher named Brother Jed would set up shop on the Oval on sunny spring days and shout at sinner students as they walked past. Sometimes a kid would stop and try to debate the guy, but it was pointless.

 

Brother Jed used to say the words "Devil" and "Hell" in a kind of long and drawn out, Roy Orbison manner, the likes of which I have not heard since.

 

oh yeah i remember him. not just osu -- he traveled around many college campuses doing that schtick with his wife sister cindy (or waifu? not sure relationship there ha) for many years. they sure took a lot of abuse.

 

That guy is/was crazy as hell.

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Brother Jed had a lineup of kids, dressed like it was 1870, who would spout off Bible verses on command.  It always bothered me how he subjected those kids to the abuse he was bringing upon himself, calling every passerby a "fornicator" right in front of them.  That was 20 years ago... I wonder how the kids turned out.

 

Just like our favorite Boston Globe columnist, Brother Jed only made himself look bad in the end.

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I went to Indiana U in Bloomington in the late 80s for one year and then left there to finish up at Miami OH.  I know I saw him at IU, and I think at MU as well. 

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