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In other big news, Delta completely overhauled their frequent flyer program. Instead of earning miles based on how many, ahem, miles you have flown; you will now earn "miles" based on how much you paid for your tickets. It probably works out in Cincinnati's favor, having some of the highest fares in the nation.

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In other big news, Delta completely overhauled their frequent flyer program. Instead of earning miles based on how many, ahem, miles you have flown; you will now earn "miles" based on how much you paid for your tickets. It probably works out in Cincinnati's favor, having some of the highest fares in the nation.

 

How is this a "Woe"?  Also did you read the entire statement?  They did not change their entire frequent flyer program, only how miles are calculated.  How you earn status has not changed.  Yet how you use your miles, more options have been added.

 

Earning miles is not solely based on miles flown, but elite status as well.

 

 

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In other big news, Delta completely overhauled their frequent flyer program. Instead of earning miles based on how many, ahem, miles you have flown; you will now earn "miles" based on how much you paid for your tickets. It probably works out in Cincinnati's favor, having some of the highest fares in the nation.

 

How is this a "Woe"?  Also did you read the entire statement?  They did not change their entire frequent flyer program, only how miles are calculated.  How you earn status has not changed.  Yet how you use your miles, more options have been added.

 

Earning miles is not solely based on miles flown, but elite status as well.

 

 

 

Correct, they did not change how elite status is earned (except for the new "MQD" requirement that went into effect this year). But they did completely overhaul how SkyMiles ("frequent flyer miles") are earned. We won't really know if it's a good or bad deal until they reveal how they've changed the other side of the equation.

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Remind me never to fly Spirit Airlines:

 

Dispirited: A business school professor studies the world's worst airline

 

"The contempt is mutual. A significant flight delay prevented a customer named James and his wife from attending a concert in Atlanta, the sole purpose of their trip. James emailed several of Spirit’s top executives to air his complaint. Baldanza [spirit's CEO] made the mistake of hitting reply all, which is how the exchange became public: “We owe him nothing as far as I’m concerned,” Baldanza wrote in response. “Let him tell the world how bad we are,” Baldanza offered. “He’s never flown before with us anyway and will be back when we save him a penny.”

 

Shamelessness has certain advantages. A more succinct expression of Spirit’s credo is truly hard to imagine."

 

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/121548/spirit-airlines-worst-airline-america?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=TNR%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_campaign=Daily%20Newsletter%20-%204%2F17%2F15

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^Note: Must be a WSJ subscriber to read


"It's just fate, as usual, keeping its bargain and screwing us in the fine print..." - John Crichton

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Did airlines collude to cut flights & raise fares to Cincinnati, Cleveland, elsewhere? http://t.co/V5cFrT87a0

 

I can't read the article, but aren't all airlines trying to cut capacity to increase revenue and seat miles?  If there is demand they will have flights. 

 

On a side note--it was cool to see 8-10 737's nudged up to concourse A the other morning when I was leaving town.  Haven't seen that in a while.  US Air, Spirit and Frontier all had mainline jets visible from the highway.

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Thankfully, it was Alaska who bought Virgin America and not one of the Big 4 airlines (Delta, American, United, Southwest). Alaska has solid customer service, so I see it as a good fit. I love Virgin America, and am surprised this happened considering recent growth at Virgin. I have a lot of points with both airlines, so the merger shouldn't hurt me. I just hope they keep the nice cabins on the Virgin planes. That's more what Virgin America flyers are worried about. Both Alaska and Virgin have good customer service, but the planes on Virgin America are the best in the business. I got this email from Virgin America:

 

Virgin America merger with Alaska Airlines

Monday, 04/04/2016

 

On April 4 2016, Virgin America announced that it has agreed to be acquired by Alaska Airlines. We believe that by joining two West-Coast based airlines known for their focus on customer loyalty and operational excellence, we will create a stronger and more competitive airline – and one that offers even more destinations and flights for travelers.

 

How does the merger process work and what does that mean for Elevate members in the short or long term? 

 

An airline merger is a lengthy process that typically takes years – not months – to complete.  The transaction itself is subject to approval by regulators, Virgin America shareholders and other conditions – a process that typically takes upwards of six months or more.  Beyond that, the process to merge the two airlines into a single carrier typically takes an additional 1-2 years. 

 

Until the transaction closes there will be no immediate changes to our flight schedules, the Virgin America product and guest experience, Elevate Status levels or your ability to earn and redeem points.  We will continue to operate as entirely separate airlines – with separate frequent flyer programs.

 

Beyond that, at the point that the Virgin America Elevate program is merged into the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan™ program, there will be no disruption to your rewards.  Both airlines will ensure that your Points balance and Status level will be reflected in Alaska Airline’s award-winning Mileage Plan.

 

This means that you can continue to fly on Virgin America and accrue Elevate Points now until the airlines are combined, and be assured that all of your Points – whether earned prior to or after the transaction announcement – will be reflected in the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan™ program.  When the programs are combined, Elevate members will be able to use their Status levels and earned Points across a significantly expanded network – including 114 destinations in North America and 900 global destinations through Alaska’s Airlines’ robust network of international partners.  Virgin America and Alaska Airlines will keep you updated on the integration of the programs in the months ahead.

 

What happens to my Elevate Status level?

 

First, nothing will happen to your Status level in the short term. The transaction itself is subject to approval by regulators, Virgin America shareholders and other conditions – a process that typically takes upwards of six months.  So in short, during that time, there will be no changes to your Elevate Status levels, the award-winning product and guest experience you’ve come to expect from Virgin America or your ability to earn and redeem points.  During that time, the Elevate program will continue to operate independently.  Beyond that, the process to merge the airlines into one typically takes an additional 1-2 years.  At the point when the Virgin America Elevate program is merged into the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan™ program, there will be no disruption to your rewards.  Alaska Airlines has assured us that your Points balance and Status level will be equitably mapped over and reflected into Alaska Airline’s award-winning Mileage Plan.  This means that you can continue to fly and accrue Points now until then.  And when the programs are combined, Elevate members will be able to use their Status levels and earned Points across a significantly expanded network – including 114 destinations in North America and 900 global destinations through Alaska’s Airlines’ robust network of international partners.

 

What happens on my next flight – should I expect an immediate change?

 

There will be no immediate changes to our flight schedules, the Virgin America product and guest experience, Elevate Status levels or your ability to earn and redeem points.  An airline merger is a lengthy process that typically takes years – not months – to complete.  First, the transaction itself is subject to approval by regulators, Virgin America shareholders and other conditions – a process that typically takes upwards of six months. Until the transaction is officially approved by shareholders and regulators, it will be business as usual and Virgin America and Alaska will continue to operate as independent airlines.

 

We will each maintain separate websites, separate guest service teams and distinct frequent flyer programs. If you book a Virgin America flight, you will fly on Virgin America.  In short, there will be no immediate changes in what you have come to expect from our award-winning booking or flight experience. Beyond that, the process to actually merge the two airlines into one is typically a process that takes an additional 1-2 years.  So you are not likely to see major changes to your flying experience for at least 18 months.

 

Why is Virgin America merging with Alaska Airlines?

 

Although we are proud to have built a successful airline with such a loyal guest following, the fact is we are operating in an increasingly consolidated industry, and we believe by joining forces with Alaska, we will create a stronger foundation for growth and competitiveness. 

 

Today, just four airlines control more than 80% of the U.S. market.  By combining with Alaska – an airline that, like us, has a strong position on the West Coast, a history of operational excellence, and a guest- and employee-focused culture – we are not only creating the best airline in North America, but one with the size and market share necessary to compete in this consolidated environment. 

 

Nearly nine years ago, we set out to build an airline from the ground up with guests like you in mind. Through this merger with Alaska we can continue to deliver on that brand promise.

 

The merger will significantly expand flying options across an expanded network of over +125 destinations in North America.

 

Why now?

 

The airline industry has changed dramatically in the past few years and just four airlines control more than 80% of the U.S. market – which increased pressure on smaller carriers, even successful ones like ours.

 

We believe that by joining forces with an airline that, like us, has a strong position on the West Coast, a history of operational excellence, and an employee and guest-focused culture, we will create a stronger and more competitive airline with a larger network and expanded flying options for our guests.

 

Merging these two strong companies now will allow the combined airline to enjoy a much stronger competitive position and an even better flying experience across a much larger combined network.

 

After the airlines are combined, what benefits will Elevate members have through the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan?

 

At the point when the Virgin America Elevate program is merged into the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan™ program, there will be no disruption to your rewards.  Alaska Airlines has assured us that your Points balance and Status level will be mapped over and reflected into Alaska Airline’s award-winning Mileage Plan.  This means that you can continue to fly and accrue Points now until then.  When the programs are combined, Elevate members will be able to use their Status levels and earned Points across a significantly expanded network – including 114 destinations in North America and 900 global destinations through Alaska’s Airlines’ robust network of international partners.  Some further benefits offered through Alaska Airline’s Mileage Plan include:

 

Alaska Airlines’ Mileage Plan has been ranked the #1 airline rewards program by U.S. News and World Report for the past two years (link to http://travel.usnews.com/rankings/travel-rewards/).

 

Alaska Mileage Plan members can earn and redeem miles on Alaska Airlines and with more than 16 partners to over 900 destinations worldwide.

 

Alaska Airlines’ Mileage Plan Miles don't expire for 24 months after last earn or burn activity.

 

https://www.virginamerica.com/cms/news/virgin-america-merger-with-alaska-airlines

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ALASKA AIR GROUP TO ACQUIRE VIRGIN AMERICA, CREATING WEST COAST'S PREMIER CARRIER

Seattle-based carrier to become 5th largest U.S. airline

 

Highlights:

 

-Deal combines two leading airlines known for outstanding customer service and low fares.

-Alaska Airlines expands its California presence, while creating new opportunities for growth and competition.

-Expanded route network benefits customers, with 1,200 daily departures.

-Transaction is expected to be accretive to adjusted earnings per share in first full year, increases annual revenues 27 percent to more than $7 billion and offers $225 million total net synergies annually at full integration.

-Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan™ to welcome Virgin America Elevate® members.

-Company headquarters to remain in Seattle.

 

 

SEATTLE and SAN FRANCISCO – Alaska Air Group, Inc. (NYSE: ALK), parent company of Alaska Airlines, and Virgin America Inc. (NASDAQ: VA) today announced that their boards of directors have unanimously approved a definitive merger agreement, under which Alaska Air Group will acquire Virgin America for $57.00 per share in cash. Including existing Virgin America indebtedness and capitalized aircraft operating leases, the aggregate transaction value is approximately $4.0 billion. With an expanded West Coast presence, a larger customer base, and an enhanced platform for growth, Alaska Airlines will be positioned to provide more choices for customers, increase competition and deliver attractive returns to investors.

 

The combination expands Alaska Airlines’ existing footprint in California, bolsters its platform for growth and strengthens the company as a competitor to the four largest U.S. airlines. Combining Alaska Airlines’ well-established core markets in the Pacific Northwest and the state of Alaska with Virgin America’s strong foundation in California will make Alaska Airlines the go-to airline for the more than 175,000 daily fliers in and out of Golden State airports, including San Francisco and Los Angeles.

 

For Virgin America customers, service will expand in the thriving technology markets in Silicon Valley and Seattle. The combined airline will also offer more frequent connections to international airline partners departing Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles. In addition, this transaction will open up growth opportunities in important East Coast business markets by increasing Alaska Airlines’ access to slot-controlled airports like Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and the two primary New York City-area airports, John F. Kennedy International Airport and LaGuardia Airport.

 

“Our employees have worked hard to earn the deep loyalty of customers in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, while the Virgin America team has done the same in California. Together we will continue to deliver what customers tell us they want: low fares, unmatched reliability and outstanding customer service,” said Brad Tilden, chairman and CEO of Alaska Air Group. “With our expanded network and strong presence in California, we’ll offer customers more attractive flight options for nonstop travel. We look forward to bringing together two incredible groups of employees to build on the successes they have achieved as standalone companies to make us an even stronger competitor nationally.”

 

David Cush, Virgin America president and CEO said, “Our mission has always been to create an airline that people love – and we accomplished that while changing the industry for the better. Joining forces with Alaska Airlines will ensure that our mission lives on, and that the stronger, combined company will continue to be a great place to work and an airline that focuses on an outstanding travel experience.”

 

“Today’s merger announcement of two great airlines coming together provides both pilot groups with an outstanding opportunity to benefit from the growth of the expanded Alaska Airlines’ route network,” said Captain Chris Notaro, chairman of the Alaska Airlines MEC of the Air Line Pilots Association. “We would like to welcome the professional pilots of Virgin America to the Alaska family and we look forward to a common goal of building a new joint pilot group that will benefit from a stronger and more prosperous airline that we have helped build.”

 

“Alaska Airlines and Virgin America are both known for providing an exceptional in-flight experience, thanks in large part to the dedication of our respective flight attendants,” said Jeffrey Peterson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA Master Executive Council at Alaska Airlines. “The combination of these two award-winning airlines provides an exciting opportunity for our members and for the Virgin America flight attendants, or Inflight Team Members. We look forward to joining together and building on our legacies of customer satisfaction to the benefit of both companies’ passengers.”

 

CONTINUED

https://www.virginamerica.com/cms/about-our-airline/press/2016/alaska-air-group-to-acquire-virgin-america-creating-west-coasts-premier-carrier.html

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Exclusive: Richard Branson Says He Won't Let Virgin America Die

Written by Barbara Peterson  April 06, 2016

In an exclusive interview with Condé Nast Traveler, Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson said he will not allow the Virgin America brand to fade into aviation history.

 

Sir Richard Branson isn't giving up on his baby. “Virgin America will never disappear from the United States,” the Virgin Group founder told us yesterday, following the merger of his beloved U.S. airline with Alaska Airlines earlier this week.. In a phone interview from his home on Necker Island in the Caribbean, the billionaire added that he will back a new airline to carry on the Virgin name, if it comes to that. “People love Virgin with a passion that hasn’t existed since the early days of aviation, and I am certainly not going to let it go to waste, even if it means starting all over again” as a new domestic airline.

 

 

 

CONTINUED

http://www.cntraveler.com/stories/2016-04-06/richard-branson-says-he-wont-let-virgin-america-die

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That's big news indeed.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Virgin America was just a poor aviation business model from the beginning. There's a way to offer a quality product without trying to be hip and having to limit yourself to catering to certain clientele and cities. VA ended up limiting it's revenue base and growth and was never going to be a real player in the US market. JetBlue does what VA did but caters to broader audience and operates on a much larger scale, so VA never really stood a chance. Odds are JetBlue and Alaska will strike a deal in the future.

 

Also, Branson coming out about this cracks me up. His entire Virgin aviation brand is feeling dated. Virgin Atlantic doesn't offer anything better than one could get Emirates, Etihad, Qatar, Cathay, ANA, Korean, Singapore...the list goes on. And many of those other airlines offer a better seat at a lower price.

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United Airlines may be poised to drop one of its hubs.

 

No story about United is complete without a little jab at CLE!  :whip:

 

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/united-airlines-may-be-poised-to-drop-one-of-its-hubs/ar-BBuX8TN?li=BBnbfcL&ocid=msnbcrd

 

This story was originally Motley Fool clickbait, and should be taken as such (as an opinion piece).  The MF has always had anti-United tendencies, and as usual, this op-ed piece demonstrates that, along with generally poor research.  I didn't put any credence to this article after reading it, and neither should anyone else.  Close down LAX?  That would be like United Airlines handing American Airlines it's resignation and intent to liquidate. 

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United Airlines may be poised to drop one of its hubs.

 

No story about United is complete without a little jab at CLE!  :whip:

 

http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/united-airlines-may-be-poised-to-drop-one-of-its-hubs/ar-BBuX8TN?li=BBnbfcL&ocid=msnbcrd

 

The industry lesson from UA dropping CLE is: the traffic didn't migrate to Chicago and Washington, as UA expected; it moved to other airlines.

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Videos Show United Airlines Passenger Dragged Off Overbooked Flight

 

United Airlines is apologizing for overbooking a flight from Chicago to Louisville on Sunday night after a video posted on social media showed a passenger being pulled forcibly from his seat and dragged off the plane.

 

Watch the video here. This is truly unbelievable:

 

I'd like to think of this as more kharma for pulling out of CLE....

 

They do drive me nuts with they way they treat their non-rev passengers.  I have been bumped from an upgrade to seat a commuting crew member.  Doesn't make sense.

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And the statement from United's CEO is shockingly tone-deaf: "I apologize for having to re-accommodate these customers."

 

They should be required to keep bumping up the dollar amount until four passengers volunteered to get off the flight. If people didn't volunteer at $800, they should've kept going. I'm sure that at $1000 or $1200, four passengers would've volunteered to get off the flight. And United paying out $4000 to $4800 would have been a much better outcome than having this video go viral.

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Passengers who are bumped should uniformly receive $2000 in free travel. Business or First class. No matter what.

 

Amen.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Passengers who are bumped should uniformly receive $2000 in free travel. Business or First class. No matter what.

 

I don't believe it should be a flat rate.

 

It's United's problem and they need to pay for it even if it makes the flight unprofitable. Delta recently paid a family siting in Economy $11k to get one of their crews repositioned.

 

You don't say $400 max or we call security. You up the price until you get 4 volunteers. If UA eats $10k to get there, so be it.

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I agree with both of you guys...you keep sweetening the deal until people cant refuse.  That HAS to be the ONLY answer.  Dragging a guy off the plane because a computer picked him is absolutely unacceptable.  Although the guy  who got dragged and the lady in the video acted pretty ridiculous. If you are the guy who was picked, screaming like a little girl is not a good look.  And mind you, i dont think he is in the wrong at all for not getting off the plane.  I just think his reaction was silly. And he was a doctor?  hope his hands arent in charge of me if anything goes wrong on the table.  The whole situation is ridiculous. 

 

If i was traveling alone, i wouldve haggled United into a free first class international ticket. the passengers had all the leverage there, im surprised nobody took advantage of it.

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Passengers who are bumped should uniformly receive $2000 in free travel. Business or First class. No matter what.

 

I don't believe it should be a flat rate.

 

It's United's problem and they need to pay for it even if it makes the flight unprofitable. Delta recently paid a family siting in Economy $11k to get one of their crews repositioned.

 

You don't say $400 max or we call security. You up the price until you get 4 volunteers. If UA eats $10k to get there, so be it.

 

exactly. mega fail by United.  they should be punished for their handling of it

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Although the guy  who got dragged and the lady in the video acted pretty ridiculous. If you are the guy who was picked, screaming like a little girl is not a good look.  And mind you, i dont think he is in the wrong at all for not getting off the plane.  I just think his reaction was silly. And he was a doctor?  hope his hands arent in charge of me if anything goes wrong on the table.  The whole situation is ridiculous.

 

He said that he had appointments with patients in the morning and would have to miss them if he got booted from this flight.

 

Airlines love having doctors on board when there's some medical emergency in the air...maybe they should treat them with more respect on the ground.

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I agree with both of you guys...you keep sweetening the deal until people cant refuse.  That HAS to be the ONLY answer.  Dragging a guy off the plane because a computer picked him is absolutely unacceptable.  Although the guy  who got dragged and the lady in the video acted pretty ridiculous. If you are the guy who was picked, screaming like a little girl is not a good look.  And mind you, i dont think he is in the wrong at all for not getting off the plane.  I just think his reaction was silly. And he was a doctor?  hope his hands arent in charge of me if anything goes wrong on the table.  The whole situation is ridiculous. 

 

If i was traveling alone, i wouldve haggled United into a free first class international ticket. the passengers had all the leverage there, im surprised nobody took advantage of it.

 

I agree about leverage. His behavior blew the leverage he had. So many people don't act smart in that situation. Always act calm.

 

Just remind the station employees that the situation is being recorded. Now pay for my hotel and I'll be staying at an MTS approved facility, not a Super 8. Pay for my meal. Pay for my taxi if the hotel doesn't have a shuttle. Refund my travel. Free First Class International for myself and my family. If they don't like it, let them lose control.

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Totally disgraceful on United's part. Horrible pr both for United and the airline industry in general... Somebody's going to lose their job(s) for this, mark my words.

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I don't think the passengers had much leverage because the gate agents know the airline's policy for how much they can offer. When I was working in Detroit, I would often take the Thursday 5:30pm flight from DTW to CVG, and it would almost always be overbooked. They would offer passengers $400 to volunteer, and often raise it to $600. One time the gate agent offered $800 so I volunteered. When the manager came over to issue the voucher, the employee got scolded because they're apparently not supposed to offer more than $600 for bumping off a domestic flight. So the issue here is really the corporate policy...it needs to be, keep increasing the amount until enough people volunteer.

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Again, deregulation.  Trump could solve this by...regulating. 

 

Regulation has plusses and minuses. In Cincy, you can certainly say goodbye to Cincinnati-Paris in a regulated environment. International routes would be assigned by demand and market size. Lots of larger markets would "need" additional service slotted for them. Cincinnati would get something like same plane service that would stop at Atlanta or Boston for a thru flight to Paris as compensation...initially.

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I don't think the passengers had much leverage because the gate agents know the airline's policy for how much they can offer. When I was working in Detroit, I would often take the Thursday 5:30pm flight from DTW to CVG, and it would almost always be overbooked. They would offer passengers $400 to volunteer, and often raise it to $600. One time the gate agent offered $800 so I volunteered. When the manager came over to issue the voucher, the employee got scolded because they're apparently not supposed to offer more than $600 for bumping off a domestic flight. So the issue here is really the corporate policy...it needs to be, keep increasing the amount until enough people volunteer.

 

Right. There is a limit. I know I'm not going to get that stuff at the gate. But if the video goes viral or even if the threat is there and I'm calm and they're acting like idiots I'll get a hefty compensation when someone at the corporate offices sees what's going on.

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Again, deregulation.  Trump could solve this by...regulating. 

 

Regulation has plusses and minuses. In Cincy, you can certainly say goodbye to Cincinnati-Paris in a regulated environment. International routes would be assigned by demand and market size. Lots of larger markets would "need" additional service slotted for them. Cincinnati would get something like same plane service that would stop at Atlanta or Boston as compensation...initially.

 

Due to deregulation and the subsequent rise of the hub-and-spoke model, prices are deflated in the big cities and inflated everywhere else.

 

For example, looking at Kayak right now, I could book a Mon-Thurs round trip from LA to New York for as low as $366, two weeks from now. Out of CVG, I don't think I have ever paid less than $700 for a round trip to any other city with 2 weeks notice. You can find better deals if you book further in advance but that's pretty uncommon for a lot of business travel.

 

So if we could "put the cat back in the bag" so to speak, and go back to a more regulated business model for airlines, mid-sized cities would see lower fares as well as more direct flights that didn't require a layover. I agree that we would probably lose our one remaining international flight. Detroit would probably lose many of theirs since they wouldn't be a big hub if we shifted away from a hub-and-spoke system.

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I don't think the passengers had much leverage because the gate agents know the airline's policy for how much they can offer. When I was working in Detroit, I would often take the Thursday 5:30pm flight from DTW to CVG, and it would almost always be overbooked. They would offer passengers $400 to volunteer, and often raise it to $600. One time the gate agent offered $800 so I volunteered. When the manager came over to issue the voucher, the employee got scolded because they're apparently not supposed to offer more than $600 for bumping off a domestic flight. So the issue here is really the corporate policy...it needs to be, keep increasing the amount until enough people volunteer.

 

That's Delta's policy. I volunteered once at the $1200 level on an overbooked flight. Ended up getting a seat as there was another no-show passenger, though.

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I don't think the passengers had much leverage because the gate agents know the airline's policy for how much they can offer. When I was working in Detroit, I would often take the Thursday 5:30pm flight from DTW to CVG, and it would almost always be overbooked. They would offer passengers $400 to volunteer, and often raise it to $600. One time the gate agent offered $800 so I volunteered. When the manager came over to issue the voucher, the employee got scolded because they're apparently not supposed to offer more than $600 for bumping off a domestic flight. So the issue here is really the corporate policy...it needs to be, keep increasing the amount until enough people volunteer.

 

That's Delta's policy. I volunteered once at the $1200 level on an overbooked flight. Ended up getting a seat as there was another no-show passenger, though.

 

The other annoying thing is that Delta doesn't allow you to combine multiple vouchers to buy a single ticket. So even though I racked up a handful of vouchers during that project by always buying a seat on that overbooked flight and then volunteering, I could only redeem one at a time. I think I got around this buy booking my next couple of vacation flights as two one-ways instead of a round trip.

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