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That's why people don't accept section 8 tenants. You'll lose your ss[/member] doing that. I remember when my stepdad decided to rent out our house after we moved. The house in Pleasant Ridge was in really good shape and newly remodeled. The RE market started to go down the tubes and he wasn't able to sell it for what he originally paid so he decided to rent. He thought the section 8 route would be good; guaranteed payments of at least $800 and he'd be helping a family who would really appreciate the house. He visited the property a couple months later and the front door had been kicked in and was off the hinges. Holes in the walls. Cigarette burns in the new carpet. Etc. Etc. In TWO MONTHS.

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I wonder how less often renters trash the places in expensive areas. In less-expensive areas, the landlords often avoid raising the rent on current tenants since they know that they aren't going to trash the place, let the pipes freeze rather than pay a $37 gas bill or park a bunch of junk cars in the yard -- unlike a stranger which might do those things. Those things aren't as much of a problem in wealthy areas which empowers landlords to start from scratch with a new tenant.

 

I have never seen a trashed apartment in San Francisco of anyone under 40. Nobody ever wants to get evicted, and usually renters do their own repairs and appliance upgrades on rent-controlled properties (we usually did). That's part of the deal when you have rent control. You never complain to your landlord and you take care of the apartment for them. That way, they are less motivated to evict you and then double/triple the rent to market rate. If you're 50% or more below market rate, you make damn sure your apartment is in good shape.

 

*I imagine people on 6-month or 1-year rotations at tech companies who have their temporary housing paid for in full by corporate are far more likely to trash apartments. I've seen that a few times as places devolved into tech frats or social media marketing sorority party hubs on Ohio University level.

 

**Oakland hipsters still trash apartments and houses on occasion, which risks eviction. The worst place I saw was a large Victorian house of hipsters in Temescal (single-family homes, condos, and duplexes in Oakland are not covered by rent control, so high eviction risk). These hipsters seemed to have all completely given up on life. The carpet in one of the bedrooms was caked in vomit, urine, and sex fluids. The kitchen had spilled beer and cigarettes everywhere. The backyard was littered entirely in trash. The smell of this place was ungodly, and I immediately bailed without finishing my interview. This was like five years ago, so I am 100% sure all of those hipsters are up in Portland now. Any reasonable landlord would have evicted them once rents spiked in Temescal (2013-2016 was the huge spike). This house was as trashed as Mill Street or Palmer Street in Athens...

 

Obviously, Oakland's illegal Burning Man warehouses/art spaces are total hellholes too and major fire hazards. As we saw last year at Ghost Ship, these illegal Burning Man warehouses are deathtraps and pose serious hazards to their surrounding neighborhoods. That's why landlords are trying to tear these warehouses down and build legal housing on the sites in West Oakland and East Oakland. There is no reason for these warehouses to exist anymore and the sites can support much-needed high-rise housing. None of them are particularly historic at this point. But of course, being Oakland, people are violently protesting this housing, or burning it down as warehouses are converted to housing:

 

Suspicious 5-alarm fire tears through Oakland condo project site

 

It's the second fire at the million dollar condo complex under construction, and developers of the project say they are sure it was arson. The fire sent flames shooting high into the sky and sent smoke drifting as far as San Jose. "That's the second time they burn it down. It's unbelievable. It looks like somebody's against us," construction worker Matt Padilla, who worked on the condo project, said.

 

The developer says he will not be deterred. "Whoever is doing this is not going to stop us from building housing. We had two armed guards and 12 cameras," Rick Holliday with Holliday Development said.

http://abc7news.com/news/5-alarm-structure-fire-investigated-in-oakland-/1988484/

 

I thank my lucky stars I've been in a rent-controlled master tenant power position for years. As soon as a roommate crosses the line, I kick them out. I am admittedly more ruthless than the average soft, passive aggressive Oakland type (but I am only ruthless on the filthy rich trust fund kids, which have been most of my roommates). Most of my roommates have been clean and responsible because they know not to mess with me. Oakland's housing crisis is more recent, so people are still learning how to survive in a hyper-gentrified place like Oakland. I learned from being poor in San Francisco how to game the system and legally protect yourself from bad roommates. I make sure I always give myself eviction rights in roommate contracts. I only give one warning for contract violations. After the second violation, I kick them out!

 

Of my last dozen roommates, only one has been dirty or damaged the flat. The bigger issues are always with relationships as roommates try to move in significant others since they can't find/afford their own place. I've had to warn two roommates about that and my right to evict them. They both left on their own once they knew I was serious about kicking them out. I also had to throw one of the girlfriends out of the shower once because I had a flight to catch! If you don't pay rent or utilities, you don't have shower rights. Couples should not live with roommates off of craigslist!

 

I've lived with over 100 roommates over the last 10 years, so I've really learned how to protect myself, my money, and maintain an upper hand in apartments. Roommates only work when one has more power than the other ones. Only one person should ever be on the original lease. That's the situation in almost every San Francisco and Oakland rent-controlled flat. Landlords prefer it this way (less headaches and only one rent-controlled tenant), and it makes it easier for them to raise rent to market rate once that master tenant moves out.

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C-Dawg, I just heard this morning at a family funeral that my cousin who has been working in San Francisco (and living for free as part of the program she's in) has a new boyfriend...who just inherited an apartment in Nob Hill from his grandfather.  I'm sure any dude in SF with a paid-for living arrangement in just about any neighborhood is scooping up the ladies, but Nob Hill is pretty big-time. 

 

 

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Nob Hill is top notch. Nothing tops it as far as dating goes. It's an amazing neighborhood as a single male and that's where I usually go out. The women are incredible in Nob Hill and the entire north side of San Francisco...though most already have their own money. :wink: That's one of the few hoods where women I date usually live alone.

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Over 1 million Moscovites to be displaced in corrupt Putin-related gentrification scheme...except it looks like a way to charge pensioners more to live in new buildings where their old one once stood:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/22/opinion/moscows-real-estate-roulette.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-right-region&region=opinion-c-col-right-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-right-region&_r=0

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The feature story in this week's CityBeat is titled Moved Aside. The subhead is, "Longtime residents are being uprooted as affordable housing options dwindle in OTR."

 

The article mostly picks on Model Group, who recently purchased the Parkway Towers building on Central Parkway near Findlay Market. Apparently Model had informed residents that they will be relocated to other low income housing in the area so that the building can be renovated. Model Group eventually plans to redevelop the site, but even then, 25% of the units will be affordable. (Presumably they will build new buildings on the parking lot next to the site...but the article did not specify.)

 

"Contrary to Model’s letter, most residents there have only mild complaints about the building’s condition, and HUD documents show that Parkway scored an 84 percent — much higher than other buildings that continue to receive HUD approval — during a recent inspection."

 

The problem is that many of these old building that have been neglected, and were converted to low income housing when Downtown and OTR real estate became dirt cheap, likely have major problems that are probably not obvious to the residents.

 

However...due to the negative backlash, Model Group has decided to delay the renovation and let current residents continue living there. "Model has since backed off telling tenants to move. In response to a request by CityBeat for comment on the situation, Chief Operating Officer Bobby Maly said the company has decided to leave the building as it is after [Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio]’s requests."

 

My biggest problem with articles like these is they they ignore the fact that it was a mistake to concentrate all of the low income housing and social services into a single neighborhood in the first place. Neighborhoods work better when there is a diversity of people. When landlords make barely any money because all of their apartments are dirt cheap, they allow the buildings to fall apart. Seriously, if you're renting an apartment for $300/month in OTR right now, it's not because you got a great deal...it's because your landlord doesn't care and is letting the building fall apart.

 

The article also sticks up for "anti-gentrification advocates" who would rather keep low income people living in that deteriorating housing, rather than letting developers bring them up to code and develop historic buildings into mixed-income housing. These people will be the ones to blame if we ever have a Ghost Ship-like tragedy where dozens of people are killed when their building catches fire because it's not up to electrical code, doesn't have working smoke detectors, doesn't have proper fire escapes, etc.

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And this:

 

Some pro-development factions trust the market to take care of housing costs, arguing that increasing density in the city by building more housing of any kind — even luxury condos — will eventually decrease all housing costs by soaking up demand. But others say those high-end units just increase property values around them and make the neighborhood more and more expensive. While data isn’t conclusive in San Francisco, studies in other cities show more housing doesn’t always equal affordability.

 

Is he seriously comparing gentrification Cincinnati with gentrification in San Francisco? Give me a f@#$&@ break.

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I run a fairly sizable Cleveland-centric instagram account. Each time I've posted something about a new development in Ohio City or Detroit Shoreway I've gotten either: a) comments claiming the development is terrible for residents because they will be priced out of the neighborhood or b) nasty direct messages asking me how I could advocate for such developments.

 

I had no idea gentrification was a four-letter word to do so many people. All I know is that there are hundreds of jobs in the service industry now that did not exist in 2010 in both neighborhoods.

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Yep. We get that all the time on the UrbanCincy instagram account. Every time we post a rendering of a new development we get three things.

 

"Ugly! Why can't the make new buildings look like the old ones?"

 

"Who will be able to afford to live there?!"

 

or just simply, "Gentrification"

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^ It fascinates me how there are homeless advocates (Josh Spring, cough cough) who vigorously campaign and fight gentrification and want to keep certain neighbohoods for the poor yet at the same time complaining that the neighborhood is poor and needs investment. You cant have it both ways.

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^ It fascinates me how there are homeless advocates (Josh Spring, cough cough) who vigorously campaign and fight gentrification and want to keep certain neighbohoods for the poor yet at the same time complaining that the neighborhood is poor and needs investment. You cant have it both ways.

 

They either want to control the "investment" or actually believe keeping neighborhoods poor increases activism among same.

 

What's funny is when they also oppose "sprawl".  In 90% of US cities that's the sole alternative to what they call gentrification.

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I heard someone put it this way recently. (Can't remember who, unfortunately.)

 

Both of these ideas can't simultaneously be true:

- Home ownership/equity is a good way for the middle class to build their savings.

- Everyone deserves housing at an affordable price in whatever location they choose.

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Residents worried they will be priced out of up-and-coming Cleveland neighborhoods

 

CLEVELAND - They've seen their communities at their worst, some hitting rock bottom. But turns out, the bounce back they're now experiencing could come at a cost.

 

As more remodeled homes and apartments hit the market in Cleveland’s hottest neighborhoods, concern is growing for those who remember how it used to be.  Helane Bryant lives on Lorain Avenue at West 78th.  "I've seen a lot of improvements," said Bryant.

 

The low-income resident, along with her neighbors in the Detroit Shoreway neighborhood are living in fear.

 

http://www.news5cleveland.com/news/local-news/cleveland-metro/building-boom-in-cleveland-neighborhoods-creating-concern

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As someone who frequents most of the Westside, maybe not everything is gentrifying, but most most neighborhoods are looking better as the land bank tears down problem houses. If suddenly you are the worst looking house on your street you take notice and step up repairs, painting, etc.

 

I know in my end of things (old Brooklyn) property management companies have been snapping up houses as fast as they can; fixing up houses and raising the rent to unheard of levels. And people are paying it!

 

It's not always a full house gut and rehab; update the kitchen and bath and now a 600 a month double unit  is now worth 800. Double and duplex prices have similarly risen.

 

I've looked at buying houses in the Westside "hood", and prices have taken a similar leap in the last 2-3 years. Not everywhere is up to Tremont or Gordon Square pricing but a definite price floor is being established.

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As you travel along the West Shoreway, the amount of development visible is remarkable. For many blocks at a time, it's as if there's a whole new city. And the portions that haven't yet been redeveloped, we hear updates on UO of new projects that will redevelop them soon. Now if we could just access them from the transit that plies the Shoreway...


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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As someone who frequents most of the Westside, maybe not everything is gentrifying, but most most neighborhoods are looking better as the land bank tears down problem houses. If suddenly you are the worst looking house on your street you take notice and step up repairs, painting, etc.

 

I know in my end of things (old Brooklyn) property management companies have been snapping up houses as fast as they can; fixing up houses and raising the rent to unheard of levels. And people are paying it!

 

It's not always a full house gut and rehab; update the kitchen and bath and now a 600 a month double unit  is now worth 800. Double and duplex prices have similarly risen.

 

I've looked at buying houses in the Westside "hood", and prices have taken a similar leap in the last 2-3 years. Not everywhere is up to Tremont or Gordon Square pricing but a definite price floor is being established.

 

The average for a Lakewood double was nearing $900 this past summer. I expect to see many asking over $1000 by next summer.

 

This sounds like a bubble.  There's been no corresponding gain in local jobs or wages.  I suspect it's also a function of dwindling candidates for home ownership, which suggests not a bubble.  At least some bathrooms are getting updated in the process, that's a community benefit. 

 

 

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This sounds like a bubble.  There's been no corresponding gain in local jobs or wages.  I suspect it's also a function of dwindling candidates for home ownership, which suggests not a bubble.  At least some bathrooms are getting updated in the process, that's a community benefit. 

 

 

Greater Cleveland is undergoing job replacement therapy...

 

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2017/05/good-paying_jobs_in_ne_ohio_re.html

"(However,) another report we did showed that over the next decade Northeast Ohio will need 50,000 new production workers," Stanton said, adding that many of the job openings will be to replace retiring workers.

 

Then there's the eds-n-meds sector which is growing as fast in Cleveland as the tech sector is in San Jose or Austin.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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As someone who frequents most of the Westside, maybe not everything is gentrifying, but most most neighborhoods are looking better as the land bank tears down problem houses. If suddenly you are the worst looking house on your street you take notice and step up repairs, painting, etc.

 

I know in my end of things (old Brooklyn) property management companies have been snapping up houses as fast as they can; fixing up houses and raising the rent to unheard of levels. And people are paying it!

 

It's not always a full house gut and rehab; update the kitchen and bath and now a 600 a month double unit  is now worth 800. Double and duplex prices have similarly risen.

 

I've looked at buying houses in the Westside "hood", and prices have taken a similar leap in the last 2-3 years. Not everywhere is up to Tremont or Gordon Square pricing but a definite price floor is being established.

 

The average for a Lakewood double was nearing $900 this past summer. I expect to see many asking over $1000 by next summer.

 

This sounds like a bubble.  There's been no corresponding gain in local jobs or wages.  I suspect it's also a function of dwindling candidates for home ownership, which suggests not a bubble.  At least some bathrooms are getting updated in the process, that's a community benefit.

 

Sales prices are increasing in Lakewood too.  Although rents and sales prices are generally a function of each other.

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I'm not a real expert on the CLE, but I'd say that gentrifiers and other urbanites are moving in while the 'hood empties out more. So even without an increase in jobs or wages you're seeing people from 'burbs and small towns both in and outside of the metro driving up rents. Remember, the small towns and rural areas are really emptying out. So when doubters are like, "Millennials are moving to the suburbs, see? I knew it would happen!" you have to remind them how quickly the small towns and sticks are losing people. Not all of them move to the city.

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As you travel along the West Shoreway, the amount of development visible is remarkable. For many blocks at a time, it's as if there's a whole new city. And the portions that haven't yet been redeveloped, we hear updates on UO of new projects that will redevelop them soon. Now if we could just access them from the transit that plies the Shoreway...

 

I rode the substitute red line bus today, it's pretty crazy how many higher end restaurants etc have gone in on Detroit in just the two or three years since I first really explored the West Side.

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Jason Segedy, formerly of AMATS, now with the City of Akron, has a new extensive blog post up on his thoughts on gentrification, especially in Rust Belt cities with abundant affordable (sometimes nearly free) land:

 

http://thestile1972.tumblr.com/post/168665095095/the-g-word-what-it-means-in-the-context-of-the/

 

I take no credit for authorship in the slightest, but they sum up my thoughts fairly well.

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Jason Segedy, formerly of AMATS, now with the City of Akron, has a new extensive blog post up on his thoughts on gentrification, especially in Rust Belt cities with abundant affordable (sometimes nearly free) land:

 

http://thestile1972.tumblr.com/post/168665095095/the-g-word-what-it-means-in-the-context-of-the/

 

I take no credit for authorship in the slightest, but they sum up my thoughts fairly well.

 

 

Pepe Is A Skunk • a few seconds ago

I've been saying for some time that Cleveland's alternatives are what some would call "gentrification" and more sprawl. So I largely agree. I used to live in the "borderlands" between metros Cleveland and Akron, and now live in Cleveland proper within sight of the Lake.

 

Make no mistake about one thing though, when and if people with options move into the city and inner ring suburbs, they will, to some degree, form "enclaves" where their values prevail. People may or may not care about the race, religion, or economic status of their neighbors, but they always care about their values and, yes, behavior. Particularly in denser areas.

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Columbus plans changes to real-estate tax breaks to boost ‘affordable housing’ in desirable areas

 

Under the proposal, to be eligible for a 100 percent, 15-year property-tax abatement from the city, housing developers in the economically strongest neighborhoods, such as the Short North, will be required to set aside 20 percent of units for affordable housing or make a payment to an affordable-housing fund that will be used to aid other projects. Developers would need to set aside 10 percent of the units for households making up to 80 percent of the median annual income in the Columbus metropolitan statistical area, and 10 percent for households making up to 100 percent of the median.

 

Developers can earn credits toward the affordable-unit requirement by including at least 25,000 square feet of Class A office space or spending at least $1 million on environmental remediation.

 

In lieu of providing these affordable units, developers may choose to make an annual payment of 125 percent of the difference between the rent collected from the 20 percent least-expensive units and what would have been collected from affordable units. The money would go into the Affordable Housing Trust to aid the creation of units elsewhere.

 

http://www.dispatch.com/business/20180129/columbus-plans-changes-to-real-estate-tax-breaks-to-boost-affordable-housing-in-desirable-areas

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Jason Segedy, formerly of AMATS, now with the City of Akron, has a new extensive blog post up on his thoughts on gentrification, especially in Rust Belt cities with abundant affordable (sometimes nearly free) land:

 

http://thestile1972.tumblr.com/post/168665095095/the-g-word-what-it-means-in-the-context-of-the/

 

I take no credit for authorship in the slightest, but they sum up my thoughts fairly well.

 

 

Pepe Is A Skunk • a few seconds ago

I've been saying for some time that Cleveland's alternatives are what some would call "gentrification" and more sprawl. So I largely agree. I used to live in the "borderlands" between metros Cleveland and Akron, and now live in Cleveland proper within sight of the Lake.

 

Make no mistake about one thing though, when and if people with options move into the city and inner ring suburbs, they will, to some degree, form "enclaves" where their values prevail. People may or may not care about the race, religion, or economic status of their neighbors, but they always care about their values and, yes, behavior. Particularly in denser areas.

 

 

economic status will always be a divide because it is the one true divide.

 

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Columbus plans changes to real-estate tax breaks to boost ‘affordable housing’ in desirable areas

 

Under the proposal, to be eligible for a 100 percent, 15-year property-tax abatement from the city, housing developers in the economically strongest neighborhoods, such as the Short North, will be required to set aside 20 percent of units for affordable housing or make a payment to an affordable-housing fund that will be used to aid other projects. Developers would need to set aside 10 percent of the units for households making up to 80 percent of the median annual income in the Columbus metropolitan statistical area, and 10 percent for households making up to 100 percent of the median.

 

Developers can earn credits toward the affordable-unit requirement by including at least 25,000 square feet of Class A office space or spending at least $1 million on environmental remediation.

 

In lieu of providing these affordable units, developers may choose to make an annual payment of 125 percent of the difference between the rent collected from the 20 percent least-expensive units and what would have been collected from affordable units. The money would go into the Affordable Housing Trust to aid the creation of units elsewhere.

 

http://www.dispatch.com/business/20180129/columbus-plans-changes-to-real-estate-tax-breaks-to-boost-affordable-housing-in-desirable-areas

 

Good to see the city tying this.

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In fairness, rents are typically higher than mortgages anyways. I've seen houses like that in uncool CLE suburbs with decent schools renting for a grand. Maybe they have 3 BR instead of 2.

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I really don't understand the allure of Nashville.

 

It's a startlingly nondescript, unwalkable place.  Here is the main drag in ultra-hip East Nashville:

https://www.google.com/maps/@36.2013047,-86.739649,3a,60y,24.23h,87.06t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sjqkP1G031stSLLrDZ_a8EQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

 

 

 

 

 

Jake, did you just doxx your brother?

 

While I'm at it, here is his old place, on the left.  $1,075/mo with no renovations, but on the cusp of ULTRA-HIP EAST NASHVILLE. 

https://www.redfin.com/TN/Nashville/1211-Katie-Ave-37207/home/107993790

 

 

 

 

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