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This is the old Arlington Elementary School that is facing South Avenue and it's bounded by Woodsdale Avenue.  It is part of the $850 million rebuilding efforts of replacing older school facilities throughout the city of Toledo.

 

Here is the rendering of the "new" Arlington Elementary School that will be replacing the demolished school:

NewArlingtonES2-15-2008.jpg

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Article published November 04, 2008

 

TOLEDO PUBLIC SCHOOLS

$5.8 million in local funds needed for Scott project

By JAMES JOYCE III

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

The Ohio School Facilities Commission recently told Toledo Public Schools it would take $5.8 million in local funds to renovate the historic Scott High School.  Most of the remaining cost to renovate the school in the city's Old West End would be funded with state money through the district's Building for Success program.

 

Members of the Toledo Board of Education will make a final decision at a special board meeting Friday morning whether to renovate Scott High with a capacity to house 1,200 students or to move forward with plans to build two smaller high schools.

 

MORE: http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081104/NEWS04/811040348/-1/NEWS


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Scott High School work back on track

Renovations await board nod after voters OK funds

Article published November 06, 2008

By JAMES JOYCE III

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

The historic Scott High School in the city's Old West End will be renovated using some of $37 million in bonds voters have approved, pending final approval from the Toledo Board of Education.  Just hours after Tuesday's initial election results had been tabulated, a school facilities subcommittee of the school board presented a draft resolution yesterday that will be up for approval by the full board at a special meeting tomorrow.

 

That resolution would put renovation of Scott High School, which opened in 1913, back into the school district's Building for Success new school program - and it would end talks of constructing two new small high schools in lieu of the renovation.

 

MORE: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081106/NEWS04/811060404/-1/NEWS

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Toledo Public Schools proposals would end all athletics, shut Libbey

District lists ideas to fill likely $30M budget hole

Article published March 04, 2010

By CARL RYAN, BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

The Toledo Board of Education last night heard a long list of cost-cutting proposals that included closing Libbey High School and eliminating athletics in the district as a way to close a projected $30 million budget deficit next year.  Other proposed cuts included the elimination of bus transportation for high school students and the establishment of a two-mile walking zone for others, along with the elimination of school crossing guards, school resource officers, the uniform subsidy, and the intern-intervention mentoring program.

 

Abolishing athletics would save $3.54 million, while closing Libbey would trim costs by $1.73 million.  Ending busing for high school students would save $1.16 million.  The district transports students who live more than a mile from school; increasing that to two miles for elementary and middle schoolers would save $950,000.

 

There will be another meeting March 23 at which the board will approve two lists of cuts — one totaling $30 million and another $17.5 million.  The $30 million list will go into effect if voters reject the strapped district's request for a 0.75 percent tax on earned income on the May 4 ballot.  The $17.5 million in cuts will be implemented if the tax passes.

 

FULL ARTICLE: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100304/NEWS04/3040400

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Not Libbey! It already has had to fight hard to stay open, not to mention is the only high school in the Old South End. It is a gorgeous landmark building near the heart of what is still a dense urban neighborhood that has survived against the odds. It's my third favorite high school in Toledo after Scott and Waite.

 

It just doesn't make sense to close down Libbey. Those kids will have to travel really far to other high schools. I don't think TPS can close down another high school without seriously putting those kids at a disadvantage due to travel times.

 

And athletics? You've got to be kidding. Toledo City League produces state tournament caliber basketball teams and it's pretty common to see a lot of support from adults in the city. The basketball games are significant events in their respective neighborhoods, and you might kill a piece of Toledo culture by giving them the axe. High school kids need stuff outside of the classroom. Sports and clubs make them more well-rounded. And it's not like high school kids can get after-school jobs in Toledo these days...

 

Other proposed cuts included the elimination of bus transportation for high school students and the establishment of a two-mile walking zone for others

 

First off, most high school kids in Toledo can't afford cars. There are no jobs for them (other than dealing drugs). Second, one mile walking is certainly realistic and even healthy for the kids (burn some calories walking to school), but two miles is stretching it. That's a lot of time spent just traveling to and from school. And if you close down Libbey, almost every single one of those kids lives too far from the nearest high school to walk there. So let me get this straight, they want to close down Libbey while eliminating bus service for all high schoolers? Those Libbey kids will need it the most! The South End kids are getting completely screwed over. If your parents can't buy you a car, how will you get to school?

 

Man, what a mess Toledo has become...

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Libbey High School debate rages on

Neighbors, officials argue over closing

By CHRISTOPHER D. KIRKPATRICK

BLADE STAFF WRITER

Article published March 25, 2010

 

On a front porch a few hundred yards from Libbey High, four friends debated the value of the red-brick school that towers over their South Toledo neighborhood. The chief reason they gave for keeping it open: Students placed into rival schools will likely have a rough time and get into fights, said Marcus Grace, a 23-year-old who attended Scott High School.

 

READ FULL STORY ON BLADE SITE

http://www.toledoblade.com/article/20100325/NEWS04/3250373

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Former Toledo mayor says he can save Libbey

By Amulya Raghuveer

Wednesday, March 24, 2010 at 7:27 p.m.

Last updated: Today at 8:00 AM

 

TOLEDO, OHIO -- Budget cuts proposed by Toledo Public Schools call for the closing of South Toledo's Libbey High School, but one school board member says he can save the school. Former Toledo Mayor Jack Ford says he will search for other ways to cut $1.3 million from the district's nearly $13 million budget deficit.  Board members estimate the $1.3 million will be saved by shuttering Libbey. Ford says he will find a way to keep the school's doors open for one more year.

 

Closing Libbey will force the school's 650 students to relocate to other area Toledo Public high schools, including Rogers in South Toledo and Waite in East Toledo.

 

READ FULL STORY ON NBC24 SITE

http://www.toledoonthemove.com/news/story.aspx?id=434497

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Scott High School restoration on track

$42M project aims to preserve structural gems

Article published September 10, 2010

By JENNIFER FEEHAN

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

Far above the winding staircases in the center of Scott High School, a gaping hole gives visitors a view to the roof.  Skylights that were part of the school when the building opened nearly 100 years ago will be resurrected when a totally renovated Scott reopens in January, 2012.

 

Dropped ceilings that for years covered the tops of the 10-foot windows have been removed, revealing the full windows that give Scott its characteristic look as motorists pass the old school on Collingwood Boulevard.  And in the fourth-floor "refectory" that once served as the school's cafeteria, stained-glass windows that were covered over years ago are now revealed.

 

5322364965_53b0d247f4_b_d.jpg

 

SCOTT RENOVATION PHOTO GALLERY

 

Full article: http://www.toledoblade.com/article/20100910/NEWS16/9090354

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Catching up on some Libby High School news:

 

Libbey could meet wrecking ball in February

Written by Michael Stainbrook, Toledo Free Press

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

 

Libbey High School might be a pile of rubble less than a year after its final graduates received their diplomas.  The Toledo Public Schools (TPS) Board of Education is taking steps to ensure the building either will be sold or demolished in 2011.  The Board’s desire to act on the 87-year-old structure results from ongoing fiscal woes.

 

According to the Ohio School Facilities Commission (OSFC), TPS must begin the demolition process by Dec. 31, 2011 for the Ohio Board of Education to pay for any of the project.  OSFC will pay 77 percent of demolition costs if the building is razed by then.  Otherwise, TPS must foot the entire bill, which could top $3 million.

 

MORE: http://www.toledofreepress.com/2010/12/16/libbey-could-meet-wrecking-ball-in-february/

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Bell seeking input on saving Libbey

Written by Kristen Rapin-Criswell, Toledo Free Press

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

 

Toledo Mayor Mike Bell said he recognizes the importance of Libbey High School within the community and is open to suggestions on how to save certain portions of the structure.

 

The mayor has been approached by several individuals within the community to save the building and he is still investigating if there is a way to save some of the structure’s newer sections, said Jen Sorgenfrei, public information officer for the city.

 

MORE: http://www.toledofreepress.com/2010/12/21/bell-seeking-input-on-saving-libbey/

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40 meet in effort to halt end of Libbey

Moratorium sought on demolition permit

Article published December 28, 2010

By JIM SIELICKI

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

A grass-roots effort to save Libbey High School or parts of its 44-acre campus began taking shape Monday night under a daunting deadline to present a plan to the Toledo Public Schools Board of Education before it signs contracts for demolition.

 

The school board has voted to level the structure and several other former schools and must have signed contracts with demolition firms before Dec. 31, 2011, to have the state pay for three-quarters of the cost.  The district voted to close Libbey because of declining enrollment and the need to clear a $39 million budget deficit this school year.

 

The nearly 40 people who met at the South Branch of the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library Monday night to consider ways to obtain a moratorium on the demolition were hit with the reality that they must have a plan within 30 to 45 days.

 

MORE: http://www.toledoblade.com/article/20101228/NEWS04/12270463/0/NEWS16

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Update on Libbey High School from the Toledo Demolition and Preservation Thread:

 

Stick a fork in Libbey, it's done. :cry: I think this ranks as one of Ohio's greatest school building losses. For the record, this was designated a National Historic Landmark. It sucks to see Ohio tear these types of buildings down. And to think Toledo is planning to tear down two dozen more school buildings is heartbreaking (about half ugly modernist buildings, half historic beauties).

 

Published: 11/17/2011 - Updated: 1 month ago

TPS awards contract for Libbey demolition

Evans Landscaping Inc. to raze former school

BY NOLAN ROSENKRANS

BLADE STAFF WRITER

 

Libbey High School took another step toward extinction Wednesday, when the Toledo Board of Education approved a demolition bid for the historic building. The former high school was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in September, but board members have argued that the building at 1250 Western Ave. is too costly to maintain. Sue Terrill, a member of the preservation committee, said after the vote that she felt like our history is lost, and theres no future.

 

Its a day that we worked, hoped, and prayed would not happen, she said. I feel devastated that a community purpose could not be found to save a nationally designated landmark.

 

The board approved a bid of about $940,000 by Evans Landscaping Inc. of Cincinnati to raze the shuttered school. The companys bid one of six was more than $30,000 less than the closest competitor. Demolition is expected to begin in December. The Ohio School Facilities Commission will fund most of the cost for the demolition, as it will at the former Beverly, East Toledo Junior High, Lagrange, and Newbury buildings, which all had demolition bids approved Wednesday by the board totaling almost $500,000. Those buildings are part of more than two dozen buildings within Toledo Public Schools that must be demolished in the next year. The Libbey demolition is by far the largest and most expensive project.

 

CONTINUED ON BLADE SITE

http://www.toledoblade.com/Education/2011/11/17/TPS-awards-contract-for-Libbey-demolition-2.html

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Gardens among projects proposed by city officials for use at former school sites

BY NOLAN ROSENKRANS, BLADE STAFF WRITER

Published: 12/15/2012

 

Vacant lots where schools once stood now dot Toledo neighborhoods.  There’s the former Fulton Academy site in Old Towne, the Nathan Hale Elementary spot in Westmoreland, and the vast empty lot where Libbey High School once stood on Western Avenue, among others.  All told, more than 100 acres at about two dozen TPS properties are vacant and mostly grass after the completion of the district’s massive Building for Success program, which rebuilt and renovated dozens of schools while demolishing the old buildings.

 

Now, TPS is faced with what to do with all that unused property, many of which may end up, at least temporarily, in city hands.  City departments this year surveyed the sites, vetting which ones may be of interest for the city, for either the city to redevelop or transfer to interested third-parties, with eyes toward assurances that those uses would fit the city’s 20/20 comprehensive plan, Mayor Mike Bell’s spokesman Jen Sorgenfrei said.

 

A list compiled by the city this summer shows potential uses for some sites.  They’re more ideas than concrete plans, but do give some sense of what might come.  A senior housing project affiliated with Warren AME Church of Toledo is proposed for the former Warren Elementary site on Woodruff Avenue.  A community garden is possible at the former Lagrange Elementary site at Lagrange and Erie streets.  And there could be future housing development at the Fulton site. ... District officials hope to start presenting options for properties early 2013, and city officials could have a similar time frame for a final revision for their list of desired TPS properties.

 

READ MORE: http://www.toledoblade.com/Education/2012/12/15/Gardens-among-projects-proposed-by-city-officials-for-use-at-former-school-sites.html

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