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Cleveland: Lakefront Development and News

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3 hours ago, E Rocc said:

 

There’s money here, but it’s spent in sequence.   More to maintain steady employment for the construction workers than any other reason.   That way if there’s a disaster we have experienced people ready to rebuild.

 

Right now the OC and 480/271 division are the main projects.   When those come to a close they will look for something else.

The irony of Deadman’s Curve (remember the laughable effort to start calling it the Be Safe Curve?) is people respect it and there hasn’t been a problem in a long time.  (Yes, I knocked wood when I said that.)  Therefore it’s not that much of a priority.

 

 I was thinking more in the design/conceptual sense.  No one ever does them because our dollars must be spent on $500 toilet seats for navy ships, etc.   Road projects always go to the lowest bidder therefore lack originality and durability.   

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Sorry it took so long......

 

Lakefront-I-90_shoreway-Gordon+Park-c201

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2020

Moving I-90 an option in new ODOT & Metroparks lakefront plans

 

Sliced in half by a freeway nearly 70 years ago, Cleveland's Gordon Park and its surrounding area were recently dubbed by east-side real estate developers as a potential "Edgewater East." It could be that and more depending on the results of two separate but related planning efforts that got underway last week.

The first is a multi-agency effort led by the Cleveland Metroparks called the Cleveland Harbor Eastern Embayment Resilience Study (CHEERS). Its goal is to accommodate dredge disposal, create additional aquatic and terrestrial habitat, protect existing highway infrastructure and enhance the lakeshore from near the east end of Burke Lakefront Airport to Dike 14 at Gordon Park as a dynamic community asset.

 

A $125,000 grant was recently awarded to the Metroparks by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) to cover nearly half of the $251,000 cost of the CHEERS plan. The Metroparks, Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT), Cleveland-Cuyahoga County Port Authority, Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Office of Coastal Management and City of Cleveland each pledged $25,200 as their matching shares.

 

MORE:

https://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2020/06/moving-i-90-option-in-new-odot.html

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"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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3 hours ago, KJP said:

 

I'm working on it. Slowly. Took me 20 minutes just to figure out when CPP's lakefront power station was built....

I'm guessing that KJP's article will be about the ICE BREAKER WIND TURBINES PROJECT...

 

Can I get a second guess??

 

THANKS KJP for ANOTHER GREAT ARTICLE!!

Edited by Larry1962
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Their acronym game is on point.

 

Quote

The first is a multi-agency effort led by the Cleveland Metroparks called the Cleveland Harbor Eastern Embayment Resilience Study (CHEERS).

 

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Good article. Hope it comes to fruition. Moving i90 there would be a game changer for the area.

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Relocating the highway would be an absolute game changer--arguably, even more transformative than the land bridge downtown. 158 acres of a high-quality park and public beach on the east side of downtown would dramatically increase Clevelanders' access to our region's most valuable asset.  Thanks, as ever, for the reporting KJP.  

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Anyone remember the cost of this idea when the inner belt was being rebuilt?  I remember Litt discussing it, but I don't know if ODOT ever really looked at relocating the shoreway at that time

 

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1 hour ago, smimes said:

Relocating the highway would be an absolute game changer--arguably, even more transformative than the land bridge downtown. 158 acres of a high-quality park and public beach on the east side of downtown would dramatically increase Clevelanders' access to our region's most valuable asset.  Thanks, as ever, for the reporting KJP.  

Absolutely!

 

Anybody who’s been to Edgewater on the weekend in recent years knows that Cleveland NEEDS another beach.

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1 hour ago, punch said:

Anyone remember the cost of this idea when the inner belt was being rebuilt?  I remember Litt discussing it, but I don't know if ODOT ever really looked at relocating the shoreway at that time

 

 

I think that the idea that was discussed at that time was moving the entire east Shoreway down next to the tracks, which would of course be a much more expensive proposition.

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you have to wonder why they built so close to the water in the first place? was there a reason? it seems like a non-brainer to build the highway to follow next to the tracks and keep the water access more open, but they didn't. very, very, poor planning in the 1950s or whenever and you cannot help but always wonder about that when you are driving around there. 

 

i hope they can find the money to move it and open up the waterfront back up, that would be fantastic.

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The FirstEnergy, then Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co, property had facilities that were pretty close to the tracks 70 years ago. And I-90 was built on the right of way of its predecessor, Lake Shore Blvd, which had at-grade intersections through Gordon Park and also went to the lake side of the then-CEI power plant.

 

BTW, I added to the article a quote from Chris Ronayne who was the architect of last citywide lakefront development masterplan. 

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"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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1 hour ago, KJP said:

The FirstEnergy, then Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co, property had facilities that were pretty close to the tracks 70 years ago. And I-90 was built on the right of way of its predecessor, Lake Shore Blvd, which had at-grade intersections through Gordon Park and also went to the lake side of the then-CEI power plant.

 

BTW, I added to the article a quote from Chris Ronayne who was the architect of last citywide lakefront development masterplan. 

 

i know, but it looks like they could have moved a substation or two and squeezed the shoreway in between it and the tracks instead of it and the lake.

 

anyway oh well, whats done is done. its good to move it now.

 

 

spacer.png

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^ I remember that during the winter, waves would come up over the break wall and freeze, leaving icicles hanging over the barrier and onto the Shoreway.  

 

Great to see this open up, since BKL isn't moving.

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That section of the shoreway is quite scary when the gales of November come slashin'.

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8 hours ago, Growth Mindset said:

I love this bridge as well. My concern is the entry and exit ramps, particularly on the west 25th/28th side. They are just not safe. There have been wrong way drivers and huge accidents at the eastbound merge. These need to be reworked to meet current safety requirements.

 

Yeah, I used to live over there, would normally take the bus downtown but I remember one morning a few years ago in the winter I had to drive in for whatever reason and the 29th at onramp to get downtown, yikes, almost got in a bad wreck. I don't think the off ramps are too bad though, especially the eastbound one.

 

They could probably just close the eastbound onramp and make people get on at 49th, it's not far at all. Or just take Detroit.

Edited by mu2010
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14 hours ago, Cleburger said:

 

 I was thinking more in the design/conceptual sense.  No one ever does them because our dollars must be spent on $500 toilet seats for navy ships, etc.   Road projects always go to the lowest bidder therefore lack originality and durability.   

 

Anyone who's ever seen the DoD specifications and documenation requirements, along with the typical order quantities, knows why pretty much anything like that is so expensive.

Edited by E Rocc

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16 hours ago, Growth Mindset said:

I love this bridge as well. My concern is the entry and exit ramps, particularly on the west 25th/28th side. They are just not safe. There have been wrong way drivers and huge accidents at the eastbound merge. These need to be reworked to meet current safety requirements.

There really is no room to rework. There are three option:

- drop a through lane coming in

- close the ramp

- keep it the way it is
 

They tried going the closing route and the neighborhood threw a FIT. So I don’t see anything changing.

 

Also, I can’t predict how long the bridge will last, but I’m confident in saying it’s safe right now. It was built in 1938, and last (majorly) rehab’ed in 1992. I’m sure they will try and maintain the superstructure as much as possibly because frankly I can’t fathom money going into a replacement. But then again other people decide that.

 

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2 hours ago, Enginerd said:

There really is no room to rework. There are three option:

- drop a through lane coming in

- close the ramp

- keep it the way it is
 

They tried going the closing route and the neighborhood threw a FIT. So I don’t see anything changing.

 

Also, I can’t predict how long the bridge will last, but I’m confident in saying it’s safe right now. It was built in 1938, and last (majorly) rehab’ed in 1992. I’m sure they will try and maintain the superstructure as much as possibly because frankly I can’t fathom money going into a replacement. But then again other people decide that.

 

 

Since its 35 MPH on the west side, is it feasible to put a traffic light at the ramp?  

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3 minutes ago, punch said:

 

Since its 35 MPH on the west side, is it feasible to put a traffic light at the ramp?  

I'm not sure if that section is 35MPH. i think it's a bit farther west where the speed limit drops.

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1 hour ago, freefourur said:

I'm not sure if that section is 35MPH. i think it's a bit farther west where the speed limit drops.

 

Pretty much it's wild wild west from the point where the bridge starts/ends- going west (Expressway Ends in X miles, aka at bridge end), and going East - 55MPH as soon as elevation starts going up towards the bridge...

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28 minutes ago, GISguy said:

 

Pretty much it's wild wild west from the point where the bridge starts/ends- going west (Expressway Ends in X miles, aka at bridge end), and going East - 55MPH as soon as elevation starts going up towards the bridge...

Heading EB the speed limit goes from 35 to 50 past the ramp merge. @GISguy is correct though, people drive whatever they want.
 

Could you put a traffic signal in? Maybe. There are different things required by law for a signal to be warranted. Remember though, the entire reason the shoreway is the way it is is because “people” didn’t wan’t the proposed signals on this stretch.

 

I believe it would be legal to put a stop sign at the top of the ramp though, which might be more politically tolerable.

 

I’ll need to do a little research...

Edited by Enginerd
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11 hours ago, Enginerd said:

There really is no room to rework. There are three option:

- drop a through lane coming in

- close the ramp

- keep it the way it is

 

I don't understand why dropping the through lane wasn't considered at the time they proposed closing the ramp. They had it closed for months during the Shoreway construction and it seemed to work fine. I lived off that exit at the time and it was much less stressful getting on the highway while the entire thing was under construction just for that reason. Three lanes coming from the west, one exits off to 25th, two continue on and are joined by the one coming on from 28th bringing it back to three. Seems simple.

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We all appreciate @KJP’s journalistic skills - he’s put most of the rest of the Cleveland media to shame time and again! And the news of the study on the relocation of part of 90 at Gordon Park is great. But the article’s gut punch and reality check for me was the line that federally funded projects of this kind, to go from study phase to ribbon cutting, take an “average” of ten years.  It made me remember that our dreams for the lakefront’s transformation have not only been a long, long time coming but will still take many years. . 
I do believe  that, in the future, the lakefront, like the city itself -which we are already seeing - will be a more activated, better utilized treasure. When I think of all the mostly landlocked cities in the country and contrast them with those on an ocean or great body of water, I feel like the most desirable tend to be the latter. That’s a broad stroke, but point being- what a resource and what further potential Cleveland has.  I’m looking forward to the (hopefully) bold transformation to come. I just wish it could come even faster... 

Edited by CleveFan
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1 hour ago, Cleburger said:

 

Cleveland Metroparks explores using recycled river sediment to make lakefront greener, more resilient

 

https://www.cleveland.com/news/2020/06/cleveland-metroparks-explores-using-recycled-river-sediment-to-make-lakefront-greener-more-resilient-beautiful.html

 

So many good, hopeful little snippets in this article. Renaissance kind of thinking that's been long overdue, at least on the action side of the equation. While the 5-15 year timeline is a letdown, it does at least give plenty of time to plan out and do things the right way - finally.  

Edited by surfohio
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Thanks @Cleburger for sharing the June 23 Metroparks-lakefront article.  I agree with @surfohio that there's a lot of good thinking - finally - being activated regarding the lakefront.  Not to get too preachy here, but sometimes I wonder if our goals and timelines could be more aspirational - across the board, as a society.  In 1960, when JFK determined to send a man to the moon in less than 10 years, it required a transformational application of technology and most importantly, will power.  The ideas that are being talked about either once again, or for the first time that can really make our lakefront what it can and should be don't have to take 15-20 years to happen.  There can be a not only a developmental impact but a tremendous economic benefit with hundreds (if not thousands)  of new jobs created when we determine to take action and do something big.   We can find the money - we just need the leadership, the sense of urgency and the commitment.  

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^ Local community leadership and for the State of Ohio to stay out of any decision making process, except for possible funding.

 

Obstructionists are not welcome.

 

Edited by Frmr CLEder

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The successful rehabilitation of Cleveland neighborhoods like Ohio City, Detroit Shoreway and even the Warehouse District took many years! 

Remember Alan Glazen's "Project Lightswitch" in Waterloo? Not a bad idea, but it didn't/hasn't really worked as intended. 

 

In my experience, the City doesn't have the money.. so projects that don't immediately benefit private sources need to rely on Foundation, State and Federal sources who all have their own project criteria. Somebody is going to need to take a risk to make big changes. 

Edited by mtnbikefan
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The city does have the money (except this year with COVID-19). Its income tax receipts were growing rapidly (35 percent since 2016) and is conservatively projected grow further in the next four years....

 

On 2/2/2020 at 9:18 AM, KJP said:

That income tax revenue number is pretty remarkable, even though it is a conservative projection. Consider....

 

2016: $314.8 million

2019: $424.9 million (estimated)

2020: $444 million (projected)

2024: $481 million (projected)

 

That's a 53 percent increase in 8 years. And it's conservative.

 

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"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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The city gets less state funding than it ever has. For example, the state used to provide 10% match on federal transportation projects  (which require 20% local match) which was discontinued under the Kasich administration. Increased income is great news but expenses are high.  

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1 hour ago, mtnbikefan said:

The city gets less state funding than it ever has. For example, the state used to provide 10% match on federal transportation projects  (which require 20% local match) which was discontinued under the Kasich administration. Increased income is great news but expenses are high.  

 

Since when? The state still provides a significant local match. On some projects, it provides the entire local match including the use of turnpike toll credits (which can be distributed through NOACA as well).


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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The State picks and chooses favored projects to pay match.. it's a major source of irritation for the City of Cleveland.

 

Check out how much state funding Cuyahoga County receives vs. Franklin and Hamilton Counties.  It was very uneven when Kasich was in charge.

 

On the Towpath, which received Federal funding through NOACA, the local match was mostly found through competitive grant programs like Clean Ohio.. there are plenty of qualifying projects that are not funded.  

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@mtnbikefanIs there a rubric or assessment metric by which the state “picks” it’s projects for funding? Or is it just what they happen to “like “ on any given day? 

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1 hour ago, CleveFan said:

@mtnbikefanIs there a rubric or assessment metric by which the state “picks” it’s projects for funding? Or is it just what they happen to “like “ on any given day? 

 

I don't know the assessment metrics.. I know some at City Hall believe they're politically motivated, but I couldn't tell you the details. Columbus was doing very well compared to Cleveland at getting funding for a while but they also had a hotter economy and most definitely a better lobbying team.  

 

Here's an article from a few years back on some of the State's changes -

https://www.cleveland.com/metro/2017/01/ohio_communities_counties_have.html

 

 

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"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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