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^This is just the opening of a negotiation. EC council has authorized its "commissioners" to ask for those terms, but doesn't mean EC council won't ultimately accept a lot less. Of course, they appear to be in this for themselves to a large extent, so who knows what they'll be willing to accept.

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Cleveland Council president rejects East Cleveland merger proposal

 

CLEVELAND - Recently, East Cleveland City Council presented an ordinance to the City of Cleveland to start merger discussions.

 

Cleveland City Council president Kevin Kelley rejected the proposal, but said he is still open to talks about a future merger.

 

“Our Council will take no action under the conditions proposed by the East Cleveland City Council,” Kelley said in a release.

 

http://fox8.com/2016/08/25/cleveland-council-president-rejects-east-cleveland-merger-proposal/

 

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^This is just the opening of a negotiation. EC council has authorized its "commissioners" to ask for those terms, but doesn't mean EC council won't ultimately accept a lot less. Of course, they appear to be in this for themselves to a large extent, so who knows what they'll be willing to accept.

The city is drowning in failure and corruption the fact that Cleveland is willing to throw them a life raft is something East Cleveland should be thankful for. I have Gary Nortons contact information I will more than likely give him a ring to gain insight on his councils thinking here.

 

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^I agree wholeheartedly and certainly hope EC City council calms down and takes a dose of reality... I find it laughable that THEY are the ones driving a hard bargain here when, from their POV, nothing but good can come about with annexation -- well, except those high and mighty EC officials who helped run the city into the ground will likely get knocked off their pristine perches.  I give Mayor Norton a lot of credit for getting the ball rolling on this.  He is the same mayor who moved to get those nice looking town homes at Euclid and Lakeside built.  Norton gets it... As Councilman Kelly alludes, this is likely just the opening round.  I'm hoping cooler heads in EC will get these crazy officials off their faux high-horse and come forward with more reasonable proposals... EC's citizens deserve better.

 

There's still a lot of save-able parts of East Cleveland despite it's overall dilapidated state.  The most save-able portions are along Euclid and to the east, esp along Terrace Rd and up the hill.  So many solid, well-built homes and large brownstone apt buildings along/near Euclid are withering away but, I'll bet, can be rehabbed and saved.  There are still walkable areas along Euclid, esp in/around Euclid's intersections with Lee and Taylor Roads, as well as a number of spots in between.  And of course there are the Rockefeller-tract nice homes on the hill, along with Hazel and Oakhill Roads which are the nicest streets in the whole city -- streets that easily could fit in Shaker or Cleveland Heights...

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I think it's a gross oversimplification to state that the current leadership is the reason why East Cleveland is in such bad shape right now. It's not as if the bordering areas of Cleveland just to the north are thriving. East Cleveland has suffered from significant disinvestment due to decades of flight and the zero sum income tax system that exists in Northeast Ohio. Simply transferring East Cleveland over to Cleveland may bring some stability, but that alone will not be enough to seriously turn things around for citizens. Cleveland itself doesn't have the funds to properly service the neighborhoods within its current borders.

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^But areas of Cleveland are thriving to the west. Not to mention the stability of Cleveland Heights to the south and east.

 

If leadership is not the culprit, then why is East Cleveland the worst inner ring suburb in Cleveland, maybe even Ohio? Given its location, history and architecture the city should have been able to make investments in the past to prepare for now, when demand for housing and office space in adjacent University Circle is the highest it's probably ever been. The city should have capitalized on the new rapid stations built their in the 90s. Instead it's been in steady decline. That's not to say EC hasn't had to deal with white flight, then black flight and other urban issues. But these issues are made worse by the leadership there.

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^But areas of Cleveland are thriving to the west. Not to mention the stability of Cleveland Heights to the south and east.

 

Areas of Cleveland are thriving to the west because of the institutions located directly in those neighborhoods. And as for Cleveland Heights, I've long argued that the "uphill" neighborhoods of East Cleveland would actually be better off joining with Cleveland Heights than Cleveland, but that's a nonstarter for multiple parties involved.

 

If leadership is not the culprit, then why is East Cleveland the worst inner ring suburb in Cleveland, maybe even Ohio? Given its location, history and architecture the city should have been able to make investments in the past to prepare for now, when demand for housing and office space in adjacent University Circle is the highest it's probably ever been. The city should have capitalized on the new rapid stations built their in the 90s. Instead it's been in steady decline. That's not to say EC hasn't had to deal with white flight, then black flight and other urban issues. But these issues are made worse by the leadership there.

 

Fair enough, but this a failure of leadership that goes back several decades and would have had to counteract forces that few other urban suburbs and neighborhoods have had success in fully fighting back. University Circle didn't start booming until well after East Cleveland had already gone past the point of no return and the majority of city's architectural assets were demolished a long time ago.

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Cleveland will be in the 370,000 range and East Cleveland well under 15,000 by the 2020 census. The fabled 400,000 people = more federal funding doesn't appear likely in the near future.

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Cleveland will more likely be in 380k range as the losses are certainly slowing.  Estimates for 2015 predict that Cleveland lost 8k people since the last census in 2010, which would put the number around 388k today. 

 

What makes you think Cleveland will lose another 18k over the next three years? 

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[NOTE: slightly older (4 months) article posted in transit thread but copied here because of the far-reaching regional cooperation lessons, beyond transit, for relatively dysfunctional metro areas like Cleveland and Ohio's other 2 Cs)

 

The Train That Saved Denver

The car-choked city overcame regional distrust to build a major transit system that is remaking the urban core and the suburbs, too.

By Colin Woodard

 

 

decade ago, travelers arriving at Denver’s sprawling new airport would look out over a vast expanse of flat, prairie dog-infested grassland and wonder if their plane had somehow fallen short of its destination. The $4.9 billion airport—at 53 square miles, larger than Manhattan—was derided as being “halfway to Kansas,” and given the emptiness of the 23-mile drive to the city, it felt that way.

Last month, arriving visitors boarded the first trains headed for downtown, a journey that zips past a new Japanese-style “smart city” emerging from the prairie before depositing passengers 37 minutes later in a bustling urban hive of restaurants, shops and residential towers that only six years ago was a gravelly no man’s land—an entire $2 billion downtown neighborhood that’s mushroomed up around the hub of Denver’s rapidly expanding light rail system.

 

 

Read more: http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/05/what-works-denver-rail-system-growth-213905#ixzz4KMFdh7wB

Follow us: @politico on Twitter | Politico on Facebook

 

 

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Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish announces new initiatives in State of the County address

 

By Karen Farkas, cleveland.com

Email the author | Follow on Twitter

on April 19, 2017 at 2:01 PM, updated April 19, 2017 at 2:29 PM

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Cuyahoga County services and programs will be expanded through several partnerships announced Wednesday by Executive Armond Budish in his State of the County address.

 

They expand on the county's commitment to initiatives including economic and workforce development and revitalizing neighborhoods.

 

 

http://www.cleveland.com/cuyahoga-county/index.ssf/2017/04/cuyahoga_county_executive_armond_budish_announces_several_new_initiatives_in_state_of_the_county_add.html

 

I heard his presentation on NPR today.  Of interest to me (and assume UO), but not noted in the above article, Budish was discussing Metrohealth and other county "regional" investments and alluded to an upcoming project that the County is going to be involved in that will be the "largest yet".  He said he couldn't divulge any details yet, but the context leads me to believe he is talking about an actual physical development (not programmatic).  I wonder if this is something new, or just the upcoming Justice Center redevelopment or something else already known to be upcoming.

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Sounds like the new Justice Center. The fact that the Cleveland police headquarters is moving says this project is likely happening.


"Save the planet. Move to the city." -- The Downtowner podcast

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crainscleveland.com

Amazon bid highlights region's disjointed approach on economic development

By JAY MILLER

7-9 minutes

 

Northeast Ohio's bid for Amazon's second North American headquarters is in. But conversations during the weeks leading up to the announcement of a local bid on Amazon's deadline day, last Thursday, Oct. 19, highlighted the fractured nature of the region's business development apparatus.

 

As the deadline approached, active and even retired economic development professionals suggested that there might have been various bids in the works in Northeast Ohio. One emailer heard that the Greater Cleveland Partnership, the chamber of commerce that draws members from the Greater Cleveland area, was leading one bid, while Team NEO, the regional economic development nonprofit that is affiliated with JobsOhio, the state economic development nonprofit created by Gov. John Kasich, was leading another.

 

Another heard that Akron and Canton were putting together a bid.

 

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20171022/news/139606/amazon-bid-highlights-regions-disjointed-approach-economic-development

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Here's a nice piece in the PD comparing Hamilton County's consolidated municipal court system with the bewildering patchwork in Cuyahoga.  Not only does Hamilton's approach save money, which they spend on useful things like ankle bracelets to track people who are out on bond, it's easier for everyone to understand and deal with.  I work in several municipal courts around here and each one is a different animal where people have different rights.

 

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/11/hamilton_county_municipal_cour_1.html#incart_m-rpt-1

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^The local rules are a nightmare to deal with at times as well as an attorney.

 

However, this is probably not possible, as awesome as it may be. Parma, the second-largest city in the county, doesn't even have a city charter. This is due, in part, to the crony politics played in the city. The clerk of courts currently has four cousins or in-laws on council, his personal friend as mayor, his brother as rec director, and two of the three football coaches at the local high schools as his relatives.

 

Getting Parma to join will be crucial, given its size and jurisdiction over other notable cities such as North Royalton, Parma Heights, and Brooklyn.

 

I would imagine the situations are similar in Bedford, Berea, and Shaker Heights - which are some of the larger "municipal courts" in the county.

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Even having a city and a court who want to be merged is not enough to make it happen apparently. South Euclid voted to merge the court, and even though the pro-merger candidate for judge lost, the current judge says she isn't opposed to it. But yet there is no support from the state to make it happen. Despite lobbying from the city, even our own state representatives won't entertain the idea because they don't want to see a democratic judge folded out.

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Very excited to be working on this. CitizenServe is the platform we are moving to. Very user friendly for both the consumer facing portal and on the cities side. South Euclid should have permitting and contractor registration rolled out in the very near future, and rental registration before the end of the year. We're looking at having the code enforcement side coming online early next year. I believe Lakewood may be slightly ahead of us in their roll out.

 

Six Cuyahoga County suburbs to streamline code enforcement, permitting

By Courtney Astolfi, cleveland.com castolfiCleveland[/member].com

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Six inner-ring suburbs in Cuyahoga County are streamlining their code enforcement and permitting processes to save time and money, share information more easily, and help identify solutions to regional housing issues.

 

The county's Board of Control on Monday approved a one-time $200,000 grant to the First Suburbs Consortium to help launch a code enforcement pilot program that will serve Cleveland Heights, Lakewood, Parma, Shaker Heights, South Euclid and University Heights.

 

 

https://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2018/08/six_cuyahoga_county_suburbs_to.html

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Before we discuss regionalism, perhaps interoperability within a single municipality's safety department should on the agenda first.....

 

@NEO_Scan

CLE: Shooting, 1014 E 146.  Fire is staged for police to clear the scene.  Police were told EMS was already on the scene.  EMS is still enroute to the scene.  If only @CityofCleveland would centralize dispatch and you know, talk to each other on that $multi-million radio system.


"Save the planet. Move to the city." -- The Downtowner podcast

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It's important to note that St. Louis, like Baltimore, is an "independent city" and is therefore totally separate from St. Louis County. It's a bit different than having a city still located within its respective county merge with the county government and the surrounding municipalities like Louisville, Indy, and San Francisco. 

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“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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Isn't SF more in the Baltimore and St. Louis model? I thought SF County was the same 49 sq miles as the city. Maybe it also includes Daly City and the city of South San Francisco, too?

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SF is indeed the 49 square miles at the tip of the peninsula, but it unto itself is the entire county, much like how Indianapolis is the same size as Marion County (save for a handful of independent communities that didn't merge). That's why its official name is the City and County of San Francisco. St. Louis, meanwhile, is not located in St Louis County and is not part of the county's jurisdiction. StL borders St. Louis County, but Clayton is that county's seat and if you look at maps of St. Louis County, you'll see a crescent-shaped area carved out from it where St. Louis is located. It's not its own county - it's literally just an independent, county-less city. Hopefully that makes a little bit more sense. 

 

1920px-Map_of_Missouri_highlighting_Sain

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“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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17 hours ago, NYC Boomerang said:

Link below to the possible merger of St. Louis and its county.  Hope Cleveland can pull this off someday.  Interesting reading about the reversal of fortunes between Louisville (merger completed) and St. Louis.  

 

https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/01/st-louis-missouri-city-county-consolidation-vote-2020/579436/

 

It. Is. Not. Going. To. Happen.

 

Seriously, the only thing bringing up the idea of the city annexing the suburbs does is poisons the idea of any new serious sharing of resources.     The A word might as well have four letters as far as suburbanites are concerned, and in a case like this they have orders of magnitude more clout than the city at both the state and federal level, due to being “in play” at election times.

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22 minutes ago, E Rocc said:

 

It. Is. Not. Going. To. Happen.

 

Seriously, the only thing bringing up the idea of the city annexing the suburbs does is poisons the idea of any new serious sharing of resources.     The A word might as well have four letters as far as suburbanites are concerned, and in a case like this they have orders of magnitude more clout than the city at both the state and federal level, due to being “in play” at election times.

 

I don’t think you can definitively rule anything out. Is it going to happen in the short term? Absolutely not, I agree. 

 

But things (and public sentiment) can change rapidly. You can’t predict what’s going to happen in 2030. There are many positives to the idea and very few (but important yes) negatives, and because of that I do t believe the discussion is ever going to go away fully.

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25 minutes ago, E Rocc said:

 

It. Is. Not. Going. To. Happen.

 

Seriously, the only thing bringing up the idea of the city annexing the suburbs does is poisons the idea of any new serious sharing of resources.     The A word might as well have four letters as far as suburbanites are concerned, and in a case like this they have orders of magnitude more clout than the city at both the state and federal level, due to being “in play” at election times.

 

It'll happen eventually, because it has to.

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15 hours ago, BigDipper 80 said:

SF is indeed the 49 square miles at the tip of the peninsula, but it unto itself is the entire county, much like how Indianapolis is the same size as Marion County (save for a handful of independent communities that didn't merge). That's why its official name is the City and County of San Francisco. St. Louis, meanwhile, is not located in St Louis County and is not part of the county's jurisdiction. StL borders St. Louis County, but Clayton is that county's seat and if you look at maps of St. Louis County, you'll see a crescent-shaped area carved out from it where St. Louis is located. It's not its own county - it's literally just an independent, county-less city. Hopefully that makes a little bit more sense. 

 

 

Thanks for the explanation. I thought St. Louis City was its own county, ala San Francisco. I had an old roommate from St. Louis, and he always used to talk about the weird political dynamic of the city and county. Seems much more fractured there than anywhere in Ohio. In fact, I just read today that one of the burbs located in STL County is now talking about seceding or joining neighboring St. Charles County, just based on this potential city-county merger. Pretty crazy stuff.

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People like to cite Cincinnati as a southern city that accidentally wound up in the north, but both St. Louis and Baltimore are in former slave states, which I think makes the tension between the city and the suburbs much more acute in those metro areas. You get the the passive-aggressive racism you see in every Rust Belt northern city mixed with the blatant southern racism that makes reconciliation across the region even more difficult. 

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“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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I never said it was going to happen tomorrow.  Regionalism is perhaps inevitable eventually.  Same with companies.  When there are competitive/economic pressures, companies at times need to combine and consolidate to stay alive (by saving costs).  Cuyahoga county is stricken by inefficiencies.  One of the very superficial, but real benefits for Cleveland, if perhaps it pulls this off one day, is to have Cleveland regain its footing in the rankings of cities by population.  I cannot stand it when Columbus is referred to as the biggest city in Ohio.  Columbus, through annexation, is now 2.7x larger than Cleveland in land area.  References to city rankings by population are so apples and oranges.  Unfortunately, Cleveland, due to its small size in land area and tremendous population loss, gets marginalized every time these rankings are referenced whether it be by state or nationally.  One of my biggest pet peeves and I really think it impacts Clevelanders' psyches and inferiority complexes. 

 

On another tangent, I do think, if things keep trending how they are in the city, and Cleveland is able to hang onto some of these young professionals as they start families, the tables could really turn over the course of a few decades (I know that is a long time, but it isn't in Cleveland terms).  What I mean is, I think what we've seen over the past 70 years in Cleveland (population loss in the city proper) can reverse itself over let's say the next 50 years.  In Northeast Ohio, with the population stagnant or shrinking, it is a zero-sum game.  I think Say Yes to Education is huge for Cleveland and I think if the schools can start showing real improvement (I think they have been), and young people don't suburbanize as much, over time, it could be the suburbs who are losing population (often high tax payers) to the city.  The economy and pressures of the 21st century favor cities over suburbs / rural.  It favors less materialism and more experientialism.  I think some suburbs have already realized this and have tried to adapt (Shaker Heights (Van Aken District)).  I think suburbs are in real risk of their own slow decline as young people trend more urban and the education quality differential narrows.  Further, retail is dying and this is going to eat away at one of the main tax revenue bases for suburbs.  

 

I think in a few decades you might see a region where the suburbs are devoid of culture and amenities and relative advantages (of course the wealthiest of suburbs will likely be fine) and Cleveland the city will remain with these tremendous cultural institutions, job centers, real public transportation and a housing stock more geared towards multi-family (which is where the country is trending).  The point is, the stagnant region is in competition with itself for the tax revenue base, and Cleveland I think is much better positioned over the next 50 years to at least improve itself (whereas I think the suburbs are mostly in a decline).  In time, I think the suburbs are going to see the writing on the wall and they might be the ones pushing for regionalism.  We are all in this together whether we like it or not.      

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There’s a huge difference between regionalism and actual merger/annexation. 

 

Regionalism happens a lot,  often on a low key basis.   Larger examples include GCRTA, RITA, NEORSD, CCPL, and the funding mechanisms for the stadia.  Smaller ones include the combining of fire departments and school districts, which even happens in the borderlands between Akron and Cleveland.   Such things happen, when they make sense.  It’s not all that controversial anymore.

 

Talk of actually merging suburbs, particularly merging them into larger cities, is a different matter.   It’s anathema to said suburbs 90% of the time, and the 10% remainder involves merging with economically and culturally similar suburbs.   Proposing it makes suburban governments resistant to anything they perceive as encroachment on their perogatives, and it can be used to scare suburban residents out of supporting things that make sense.   You may have to have come from an inner ring suburb to understand the depth of this antipathy.

 

On a practical political basis, it’s very preventable.   If it ever becomes a real possibility, the suburbanites will go to the state to prevent it.   They will.  The Republicans will automatically support them, they have very little to lose in the larger cities.  The Democrats will be scared not to, because they need their existing share of the suburban vote.   They would prefer it not even become a topic.

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I recently read somewhere that cities that havent gone the annex route i.e. Cleveland, might be better off in the long run. The center city wont be on the hook to deal with these low desity overbuilt infrastructure places when they start failing and become financially insolvent, which they most likely will due to the very nature they were built. Sure you can try to retro fit them but that seems like an uphill battle. 

I hadent thought about it that way but its an interesting take and I could see it possibly playing out that way.

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10 minutes ago, viscomi said:

I recently read somewhere that cities that havent gone the annex route i.e. Cleveland, might be better off in the long run. The center city wont be on the hook to deal with these low desity overbuilt infrastructure places when they start failing and become financially insolvent, which they most likely will due to the very nature they were built. Sure you can try to retro fit them but that seems like an uphill battle. 

I hadent thought about it that way but its an interesting take and I could see it possibly playing out that way.

 

Well, that obviously could happen. Who in 1940 would have thought Cleveland proper or East Cleveland would be in the condition they are in now. If investment is allowed to continue to move further out, with no population back-filling those moving, then yes. However, if people do move back into the inner city, inner ring burbs, and outer ring  neighborhoods, providing tax revenue, they should be OK with proper management. The key is disallowing, via a growth boundary or other restrictions to limit development as it creeps further from the core.

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Does Ohio law permit a Cleveland and Cuyahoga County merger without involving the suburbs?  That approach would encourage more county-wide services, planning, and financing without touching the 'third rail' of school district mergers.


There's nothing wrong with optimism, as long as you don't get your hopes up.

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I'd be more interested in merging counties to create "metropolitan" counties with special powers that are currently in the hands of the (rurally-dominated) state government. If you merged Cuyahoga, Lake, Lorain, Geauga, Medina, Summit, and Portage into a single county, you'd have a government specifically designed to make decisions on the regional level, but the cities and school districts would still function independently. The scheme could also devolve certain powers that are best handled on the metropolitan level but are repeatedly pre-empted at the state level, such as minimum wage, labor standards, and transportation funding. You could even throw in the power to create an urban growth boundary and contain the sprawl. 

 

Lest Cleveland-Akron get special treatment, similar entities could be created by merging Hamilton/Butler/Warren/Clermont and Franklin + surrounding counties. Mahoning + Trumbull could be merged, and special powers could be delegated to Lucas and Montgomery counties.

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What you're describing is really "city-states".  As a blue sky, blank slate idea it is pretty much how I'd like to see our region governed, but how to get from here to there?

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On 2/1/2019 at 8:10 AM, viscomi said:

I recently read somewhere that cities that havent gone the annex route i.e. Cleveland, might be better off in the long run. The center city wont be on the hook to deal with these low desity overbuilt infrastructure places when they start failing and become financially insolvent, which they most likely will due to the very nature they were built. Sure you can try to retro fit them but that seems like an uphill battle. 

I hadent thought about it that way but its an interesting take and I could see it possibly playing out that way.

 

I could see this happening soon--but in Cleveland's case they'd be taking on the worst of the worst.  Suburbs like East Cleveland, Warrensville, Bedford etc that have suffered from further white-flight as more affluent black families moved east into the inner ring suburbs.  

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On 2/1/2019 at 7:40 AM, E Rocc said:

There’s a huge difference between regionalism and actual merger/annexation. 

 

Regionalism happens a lot,  often on a low key basis.   Larger examples include GCRTA, RITA, NEORSD, CCPL, and the funding mechanisms for the stadia.  Smaller ones include the combining of fire departments and school districts, which even happens in the borderlands between Akron and Cleveland.   Such things happen, when they make sense.  It’s not all that controversial anymore.

 

Talk of actually merging suburbs, particularly merging them into larger cities, is a different matter.   It’s anathema to said suburbs 90% of the time, and the 10% remainder involves merging with economically and culturally similar suburbs.   Proposing it makes suburban governments resistant to anything they perceive as encroachment on their perogatives, and it can be used to scare suburban residents out of supporting things that make sense.   You may have to have come from an inner ring suburb to understand the depth of this antipathy.

 

On a practical political basis, it’s very preventable.   If it ever becomes a real possibility, the suburbanites will go to the state to prevent it.   They will.  The Republicans will automatically support them, they have very little to lose in the larger cities.  The Democrats will be scared not to, because they need their existing share of the suburban vote.   They would prefer it not even become a topic.

 

no merger is not anathema. you are just stuck in one point in time, the current one. its happened before (ohio city, west park merged w/cle) and will happen again given much larger forces at work, ie., the unstoppable global trend toward super cites. for older cities with long established burbs it will take two things, gradually regionalizing services and the hub city becoming a more attractive place to be. dont hold your breath tho, because per your examples politics slow the roll, but eventually major if not total sprawl consolidation is inevitable.

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On 2/2/2019 at 10:33 AM, X said:

What you're describing is really "city-states".  As a blue sky, blank slate idea it is pretty much how I'd like to see our region governed, but how to get from here to there?

 

The final step in the process would certainly be a statewide ballot measure outlining the borders and powers of the metropolitan counties/city states. Getting such an amendment on the ballot (and passing it) will require a big signature gathering drive, grassroots support in all corners of the state, and quite a bit of money. 

 

The first step is to get people talking about it and debating what it would look like. You'll need a steady stream of articles in the Plain Dealer, Dispatch, Enquirer, Vindicator, and Blade covering the debate and progress. The Cuyahoga County executive could convene a summit with the commissioners of surrounding counties and executive of Summit County. The mayors of Columbus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Dayton, and Youngstown could do the same with their neighboring counties. 

 

As far as money goes, there could be an interesting alliance between progressive groups (who hate state-preemption) and business groups (who dislike regional fragmentation). Of everything, that seems to be the most difficult part.

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^ why not go further with that idea and just do five regions in the state? maybe that is over reaching for a state with a flat population history, but it would end the issue for good likely and still simplify a lot of redundant services. it could be done to let cities keep their own school districts. that's certainly a much more divisive and close held public service, especially in ohio, than sanitation, fire, roadwork, etc..

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