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Cleveland: Random Development and News

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Some of these facilities have "thousands" of employees. See my blog posting about the Euclid project.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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You both are right. Some industrial uses need a relatively large number of employees. All I was saying is that I hope whatever gets built is more like an Amazon facility with a thousand employees, rather than a storage facility with just two -- a janitor and a security guard.

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I dig it. I was seeing seicer's hundreds of employees and raising him another thousand or so. Deal.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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Anybody know something about this? It's the vacant land bounded by 77 and Independence pkwy that the city has been expanding with fill dirt the last couple years. I don't think it's the Charter Steel expansion, since I thought that was adjacent to their existing site. A simple search for ETC Commercial Property doesn't bring up anything except for the LLC registration. Hopefully somebody else is savvy enough to use the CPA/laywer who registered the LLC to discover something useful.

 

 

Calendar No. 17-111: 4800 Ruffini Court

ETC Commercial Property LLC, owner, proposes to construct a new 2 story building and parking lot in

an A3 General Industry District. The owner appeals for relief from the strict application of the

following sections of the Cleveland Codified Ordinances:

1. Section 349.07(a) which states that accessory off-street parking spaces, driveways and

maneuvering areas shall be properly graded for drainage so that all water is drained within the

lot providing such parking spaces, surface with concrete, asphaltic concrete, asphalt or other

surfacing materials.

2. Section 352.10(3)(b) which states that outdoor storage of equipment requires a screen barrier

of 75% or more opacity to conceal use and no barrier is proposed.

3. Sections 352.10-352.12 which states that a six foot wide landscaped strip screening parking

from the street is required and no screening is proposed. (Filed April 13, 2017)

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2017/crr05-08-2017.pdf (page 4)

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bza/agenda/2017/images/bza05-08-2017.pdf (page 27-28)

 

edit: Added picture of parcel to post.

 

The property (dubbed the Cuyahoga Valley Industrial Center by the Value Recovery Group which cleaned/prepped the former coke plant site under contract with the city) was sold to ETC Commercial Property LLC on April 11, 2017, so they're moving pretty fast on it. However, when you click the tax mailing address for this property, it still shows the prior owner's information -- Greater Cleveland Community Improvement Corp., which shares the same office suite/address on Bolivar as Team NEO, so I assume one of their incorporations.

 

But now I see on the Manta listing )http://www.manta.com/c/mt1jlf6/the-greater-cleveland-community-improvement-corporation) for the Greater Cleveland Community Improvement Corp. has them at 1375 East 9th St # 1930. The company listed there is:

 

Kushner, Hamed & Grostic Co., LPA

One Cleveland Center

1375 East Ninth Street

Suite 1930

Cleveland, Ohio 44114

 

Nothing is jumping out at me for the time being.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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RE Journals usually regurgitates other publication's articles. This one is an original piece...

 

Cleveland’s downtown transforms through redevelopment, tax credit program

May 05, 2017  |  Sara Freund

 

The very first electronic traffic light flickered on in 1914 on Cleveland’s busy Euclid Avenue. It signaled a bustling, leading city—but somewhere in the following decades the buildings on that street fell into disrepair, leaving vacant, largely obsolete, product. But in 2006, that started to change.

 

That’s when the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Program began investing in the underdeveloped downtown and helped to reshape the area. In 2015, the program reached a milestone with the completion of its 100th project. The most recent report from 2015 states that more than 9.59 million square feet has been rehabilitated, a total of 141 buildings and nearly $125 million in tax credits issued.

 

“What’s happened is a sea change in both perception and reality, especially in the last 12 years,” said Michael Deemer, executive vice president of business development at the Downtown Cleveland Alliance.

 

MORE:

http://www.rejournals.com/2017/05/05/clevelands-downtown-transforms-through-redevelopment-tax-credit-program/


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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Electioneering....

 

Mayor Frank Jackson to target $65M at neighborhoods for commercial growth, jobs and housing

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/05/mayor_frank_jackson_to_target.html


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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RE Journals usually regurgitates other publication's articles. This one is an original piece...

 

Cleveland’s downtown transforms through redevelopment, tax credit program

May 05, 2017  |  Sara Freund

 

MORE:

http://www.rejournals.com/2017/05/05/clevelands-downtown-transforms-through-redevelopment-tax-credit-program/

 

The article states that the Huntington building started last year with a build out of a Hilton curio and apartments.  Has that project in fact started?  If so I missed that one!

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Hey There,

Is anyone here at U.O. skilled at updating the skyscrapers.com site (link below) so it includes recently completed structures in Cleveland like the Hilton; proposed structures like 515 & Nucleus; under construction towers like One University Circle, and other serious proposals? 

I'd love to see Cleveland represented well on this site, but I fear my own digital renderings would appear as submitted by a 4th grader, (no offense to any 4th grader who already has exceptional digital rendering skills.)

 

http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?cityID=147

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

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SATURDAY, MAY 13, 2017

Busy month: 3 big downtown Cleveland projects?

 

The next month may be very busy with Downtown Cleveland construction announcements. As a follow-up to my recent posting The Cleveland Skyscraper Building-Binge Starts, it appears that three projects will be making news very soon. One project is a surprise.

 

Least surprising is that workers this month are swarming over the nine-level 515 Euclid parking garage. Stark Enterprises will soon erect a $62 million, 19-story apartment building called The Beacon on top of it. The workers are construction managers who are mapping out the logistics and sequencing of work to be done over the next 16-18 months. The Beacon, with its 187 apartments, is due to open in late-2018.

 

The project faces a small glitch, however. Stark representatives discovered a typo in a variance approved in Sept. 2016 by the city's Board of Zoning Appeals regarding the height of The Beacon. In 2016, BZA approved a height of 340 feet. Instead, Stark is requesting a height of 355 feet at BZA's May 22 hearing. It isn't known what, if any, delay this may cause to the project.

________

 

I've also learned from several sources that Medical Mutual's board of directors met this week and have decided on an office consolidation plan, including new downtown headquarters. The address or size of this office building isn't known, but at least several major Northeast Ohio developers responded to a request for proposals from Medical Mutual last year on new or renovated buildings for Ohio's largest health insurance company. It is quite likely the public will learn in the next month about the winning proposal. Medical Mutual said it would prefer to lease its new location, even if it was built specifically for the insurer.

 

MORE:

http://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2017/05/busy-month-3-big-downtown-cleveland.html


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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KJP...if you are correct about the Playhouse Square building I am going to hunt you down and plant a big wet one on you, so be forewarned.  This is the project I have been wanting for years.

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KJP.....this is fantastic!!!  Especially the Playhouse square tower.  I'm willing to give up parking in my favorite lot for this!!  I never understood why they built that garage on the back to begin with!

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Doubt it. A couple hundred apartments for each building doesn't move the needle in a far larger marketplace. If anything, the more apartments that are getting added downtown, the more rents increase.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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I don't totally agree with you KJP in that the idea of supply and demand would say that adding more supply eventually will meet demand. if it exceed demand, rents will go down. That said, I think you are saying that the supply still has not met, and certainly not exceeded demand. I agree. This particular tower wouldn't stop Nucleus. We will get to that point one day.

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We will reach that point someday, but we're far from it now. When rents continue to rise as more residential inventory is added, that's a very encouraging sign for real estate investors. It means this beast is starting to generate its own momentum.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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There are a ton of proposed vacated streets on this week's agenda. Here's one that I don't know where it is. Can anyone ID what it is? Note that it is in Ward 3 so it could be downtown, the Flats, Ohio City or Tremont...

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2017/05192017/index.php

 

Agenda for May 19, 2017

 

MANDATORY REFERRALS

Ordinance No. 501-17(Ward 3/Councilmember McCormack): To vacate a portion of Bay Street (formerly Plum Street).


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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It's a section of East 13th between Carnegie and the Innerbelt.  I found Plum Street on the 1874 historic map here: http://peoplemaps.esri.com/cleveland/

 

I'm not finding it.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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Make sure you're on the 1874 map.  Click the 4 squares arranged in a grid to bring up the "basemap gallery".  And remember that Carnegie was "Ohio Street" in 1874.  Also, they spelled it "Plumb" in 1874, but not in later maps, when it was "Plum".

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Got it, thanks. But that's not Bay Street now. It's 13th Street, right? The application says it would vacate Bay Street, formerly Plum Street. Still confused.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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I don't totally agree with you KJP in that the idea of supply and demand would say that adding more supply eventually will meet demand. if it exceed demand, rents will go down. That said, I think you are saying that the supply still has not met, and certainly not exceeded demand. I agree. This particular tower wouldn't stop Nucleus. We will get to that point one day.

 

I would like to think we're getting close to a critical mass around E9th and Euclid.  There is starting to be a palpable energy at most times of the day and with Leader, Garfield, Halle coming online I hope it will continue.  I think there is a point where you start to get an increase in demand because enough people live there.  People move to new york and chicago simply because there are lots of other people to meet there and their friends are all moving there.  This has not been the case in Cleveland, but if we can get to that point it could get exciting.  I wonder how far off we are from rents justifying new construction?  Or maybe we are close but demand concerns are lingering?

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^I think the threshold for new construction is when rents top $2.00/psf.  With some construction projects in the city (just none downtown yet), we've passed that mark.  I think it's only a matter of time.

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Got it, thanks. But that's not Bay Street now. It's 13th Street, right? The application says it would vacate Bay Street, formerly Plum Street. Still confused.

 

Yes, 13th St.  I can't find a Bay St. through any kind of search.

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Yes, 13th St.  I can't find a Bay St. through any kind of search.

 

If true, this is surrounded by Frangos properties. Is someone about to make a move on these properties? If so, does Frangos purchasing all those properties along East 14th up to Prospect have anything to do with this?? Wondering aloud...


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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Interesting 1920s era map.  Of note: Chester Ave, from downtown, ended at E. 30th street.  There was a small section of (what became) it named Windsor Ave (between E. 40 and 55th streets), which explains for that tiny block of those still surviving old Philly-style row houses on Windsor Terrace in about the 4100 block.  Most of what we know of as Chester today was an extension built during or after WWII IIRC (which is why, until recent years, there were very few homes, apts or businesses that actually fronted on Chester). 

 

Also, of course, there was no Shaker Square at that time, but Moreland Circle where, in the middle, the 2 Rapid lines split, as opposed a block east of that location where they now separate.  Surrounding it were mostly numbered lots in the Van Sweringen allotment... Also the Shaker Rapid, called the Cleveland & Youngstown RR, heading downtown, ended on a ramp up to the street at E. 34 where rapid cars headed to Public Square over city streets... Terminal Tower and the (then referred to as) Terminal Group buildings were still on the drawing board.  Some numbered streets were referred to as their original names, like Highland Street for W. 117... good stuff.

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... also the large building on S. Woodland in Shaker, now known as Woodbury 1-8 Elementary, which was Woodbury Junior High in my day, was originally Shaker's High School, as noted by the map... Onaway ES next door, was only planned on the map.  The current HS, at that time, wasn't even projected...

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A while back 4 homes were torn town along near the border of University Heights and Beachwood. The owner intended to put a car wash in. This was a horrible idea.

 

They've "upgraded" to a drive-in burger joint.

 

http://www.clevelandjewishnews.com/news/local_news/swensons-drive-in-eyes-university-heights-location/article_6c06444a-39b4-11e7-860e-c394e8a00f83.html

 

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Swenson's gets a pass, they have good enough food to allow for bad urbanism!  :laugh:


“To an Ohio resident - wherever he lives - some other part of his state seems unreal.”

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Preservation tax credits energize Cleveland's aging urban landscape

May 20, 2017 UPDATED 2 DAYS AGO

By STAN BULLARD   

 

After the Leader Building opened in 1912 at 526 Superior Ave. in downtown Cleveland, reporters and printers hustled to meet daily newspaper deadlines for 20 years there for The News-Leader. After the paper was sold to The Plain Dealer, it was moved, but the ornate lobby remained a feature after the structure became a multitenant office building.

 

At the same time, across the Cuyahoga River, at 1526 W. 25th St., a building constructed in the 1870s for the family-owned Baehr Brewery was serving as a machine shop and would later become a warehouse for convention displays.

 

Both buildings have just joined the lineup of adaptive reuse projects of historic buildings that are becoming apartments at a rapid rate. They are among an onslaught of more than 1,100 suites that will open in 2017, and will later be joined by buildings such as The Standard, 99 W. St. Clair Ave., and Garfield, 1965 East Sixth St., and further the transformation of downtown Cleveland as a residential neighborhood and boost the population of the city's West Side neighborhoods.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20170520/NEWS/170529996/-preservation-tax-credits-energize-clevelands-aging-urban-landscape


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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I was thinking of writing an article about this subject, but including more of the other huge sites in Cleveland and inner-ring suburbs that are being targeted for warehouses, light industrial or other large-scale commercial uses. Crain's only scratched the surface of everything that's in play right now...

 

NEO's warehouse boom is built by e-commerce

May 21, 2017 UPDATED 2 DAYS AGO

By STAN BULLARD   

 

The rise in demand for huge warehouses to serve the expanding e-commerce market is combining with a tight industrial market in Northeast Ohio to produce what looks to be the region's first great industrial-zoned land rush of the 21st century.

 

In a striking sign of the times as internet retail sales climb and bricks and mortar stores weather an epic shakeout, an affiliate of Atlanta-based United Parcel Service just bought a 65-acre parcel in Middleburg Heights from heirs of the original 19th-century farming family that put it into service on Engle Road in the 1800s.

 

The price: $7.5 million, according to Cuyahoga County land records.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20170521/NEWS/170529985/neos-warehouse-boom-is-built-by-e-commerce


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017

Is Cleveland erring in the marketing of its industrial sites?

 

Development of the largest shovel-ready industrial/warehousing sites in the City of Cleveland aren't attracting much private-sector interest despite discounted asking prices. Meanwhile, inner-ring suburbs offering large parcels that are almost shovel-ready are having greater success in drawing private sector interest and potentially thousands of jobs from significant planned developments.

 

What, if anything, is the City of Cleveland doing wrong vs. what, if anything, are the suburbs doing right?

 

Take, for example, the largest available site in Cleveland in more than a half-century. Located off Interstate 77 south of the Pershing Avenue exit, the 65-acre Cuyahoga Valley Industrial Center offered the potential for up to 750,000 square feet of new manufacturing space and 1,000 new jobs, according to promotional materials for the site.

 

Two prospective users of the former International Steel Group coal/coke plant are finalizing plans for their building construction projects that will occupy about half of the center. More than $5 million in taxpayer funds from the city and state were used to clear and clean the polluted property. But the number of jobs involved will likely be far less than backers of the redeveloped site had hoped.

 

MORE:

http://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2017/05/cleveland-erring-in-marketing-industrial.html


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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I heard some bad news over the weekend.  Hopefully it's not true, but I heard from a Sherwin employee that due to the Valspar acquisition - the expansion of Sherwin may come outside of downtown.  I forget the location, but certainly not the tower on Public Square that we all wanted.

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