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Campus District?


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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I've done work for Woda several times over the years in an engineering capacity, and have never known them to do anything other than market rate housing, most of which is aimed at seniors.  Wonder if this will really turn out different then their typcial business model. 

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I've done work for Woda several times over the years in an engineering capacity, and have never known them to do anything other than market rate housing, most of which is aimed at seniors.  Wonder if this will really turn out different then their typcial business model. 

 

Do you mean to say affordable housing for seniors? I do not believe market rate is common for Woda.

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new york developer bets on both sides of the 216: east and west

ERIN O'BRIEN | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2015

 

A New York based developer has taken note of the renaissance illuminating the 216 and has decided to get in on the action on both the east and west sides of town.

 

Community, Preservation & Restoration (CPR) Properties has purchased apartment buildings at 13450 Cedar Road in Cleveland Heights and 3199 West 14th Street in Tremont. CPR partners Noah Smith and Ted Haber are naming the buildings Canterbury House and The Edison respectively.

 

"We're not in Cleveland by accident," says Smith, who has been in development for 25 years. "We're only in markets that we feel are exploding."

 

MORE:

http://freshwatercleveland.com/devnews/newyorkdeveloper011415.aspx


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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new york developer bets on both sides of the 216: east and west

ERIN O'BRIEN | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14, 2015

 

A New York based developer has taken note of the renaissance illuminating the 216 and has decided to get in on the action on both the east and west sides of town.

 

Community, Preservation & Restoration (CPR) Properties has purchased apartment buildings at 13450 Cedar Road in Cleveland Heights and 3199 West 14th Street in Tremont. CPR partners Noah Smith and Ted Haber are naming the buildings Canterbury House and The Edison respectively.

 

"We're not in Cleveland by accident," says Smith, who has been in development for 25 years. "We're only in markets that we feel are exploding."

 

MORE:

http://freshwatercleveland.com/devnews/newyorkdeveloper011415.aspx

I think people will be surprised in the next 9-12 months with deals that will bring in large-money investors into the city for [re]development. This is certainly a good start, and also nice to see its not just the CBD that is getting all the love.

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I think people will be surprised in the next 9-12 months with deals that will bring in large-money investors into the city for [re]development. This is certainly a good start, and also nice to see its not just the CBD that is getting all the love.

 

Very intriguing comment. I looked back at your old postings and I have to wonder if you have links with developers/investors given your past comments! ;) I noticed you've been paying attention to rents-per-square foot over the years.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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dca seeks qualified firms, individuals to rethink main avenue bridge underpass

 

The area under the Main Avenue Bridge underpass at the intersection of West 9th Street and Main Avenue is an unusual corner of the city that's soon to get some attention—from up to three entities that have yet to be determined. Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) is on a mission to find them.

 

The organization has queried near and far to find up to three creative professionals or teams they deem qualified to propose upgrades for the underpass area, which Laura Wiegand, director of development and community relations at DCA, describes this way: "We view it as an area that has either real or perceived gaps or barriers in the urban fabric, meaning that it's not a pleasant pedestrian experience. It's not a working bicycle connection."

 

The space also lacks lighting and wayfinding for pedestrians, says Wiegand. "It's actually even difficult for vehicles to figure out that this is how you get down to the Flat's east bank. It's especially dark in daylight because of the shadows."

 

Read more: http://www.freshwatercleveland.com/devnews/mainaveunderpass030315.aspx

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dca seeks qualified firms, individuals to rethink main avenue bridge underpass

 

The area under the Main Avenue Bridge underpass at the intersection of West 9th Street and Main Avenue is an unusual corner of the city that's soon to get some attention—from up to three entities that have yet to be determined. Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) is on a mission to find them.

 

The organization has queried near and far to find up to three creative professionals or teams they deem qualified to propose upgrades for the underpass area, which Laura Wiegand, director of development and community relations at DCA, describes this way: "We view it as an area that has either real or perceived gaps or barriers in the urban fabric, meaning that it's not a pleasant pedestrian experience. It's not a working bicycle connection."

 

The space also lacks lighting and wayfinding for pedestrians, says Wiegand. "It's actually even difficult for vehicles to figure out that this is how you get down to the Flat's east bank. It's especially dark in daylight because of the shadows."

 

Read more: http://www.freshwatercleveland.com/devnews/mainaveunderpass030315.aspx

 

Well one big reason it's an unpleasant pedestrian experience is that all those windows facing the street have been bricked over. The new hotel doesn't do a great job of embracing the street either.

 

Some new signage would be nice for wayfinding. I hope nobody suggests paving over the brick street.

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I love the dingy, gritty, shadowy underside of the bridge. It's a wonderful contrast to the ultra-modern, angular cleanliness of Flats East Bank.


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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I know jack about feasibility of this, but I think it would be neat if this area was transformed into a combination of the main drag on Venice Beach and SOHO, and by that I mean, lots and lots of street vendors. Permitted sellers who set up and sell art, jewelry, do sketches, do unicycle tricks, play music, do henna tattoos, sell books, music, and of course, lots of food street vendors, the kind that we are really completely lacking here. This area could be given its own branded name and become a vibrant and fun area to walk through and around.

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I know jack about feasibility of this, but I think it would be neat if this area was transformed into a combination of the main drag on Venice Beach and SOHO, and by that I mean, lots and lots of street vendors. Permitted sellers who set up and sell art, jewelry, do sketches, do unicycle tricks, play music, do henna tattoos, sell books, music, and of course, lots of food street vendors, the kind that we are really completely lacking here. This area could be given its own branded name and become a vibrant and fun area to walk through and around.

 

Great thinking. It improves the environment without costly construction. Like KJP I do kinda dig the unique environment under the bridge; lots of character.

 

If NYC can build a park under ground, then CLE can do something interesting and outside the box to highlight this area.

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how about getting the Cleveland flea to operate/program the area in the spring/summer/fall?

 

Looks like they went from Sterle's parking lot to over by Galluci's

 

http://www.theclevelandflea.com/our-markets/

 

who owns the land/ROW under the bridge?  the city? state? individual owners?

 

I went to the portland saturday market once while out on the west coast.

 

http://www.portlandsaturdaymarket.com/

 

something similar would be great.    The area under the bridge, one of the vacant surface lots around public square, over by the WSM...but maybe sunday.  when the market is closed.

seems to be exactly what you guys are talking about.

 

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In the absence of a general Shaker Heights development/reinvestment thread, I'm posting this here:

 

Shaker's updated Housing & Neighborhood Plan includes $100,000 for Moreland Innovation Zone

By Thomas Jewell, special to Northeast Ohio Media Group

on March 24, 2015 at 10:29 AM, updated March 24, 2015 at 10:53 AM

 

SHAKER HEIGHTS, Ohio -- While work to broaden the city's commercial tax base from its current level of 10.3 percent continues, Shaker's housing stock remains the bedrock of the community.

 

"For cities like Shaker Heights, where 89.7 percent of the property tax base is residential, maintaining strong property values is an imperative, not a choice," Neighborhood Revitalization Director Kamla Lewis said.

 

With that in mind, City Council voted Monday (March 23) to put $100,000 toward a Moreland Innovation Zone Initiative, aimed at "re-branding" the neighborhood as a center of innovation and entrepreneurial activity.

 

MORE:

http://www.cleveland.com/shaker-heights/index.ssf/2015/03/shakers_updated_housing_neighb.html


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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This could affect the update of Quicken Loans Arena and/or Stark's nuCLEus development...

 

Armond Budish: Debt concerns put some Cuyahoga County projects on hold

http://www.cleveland.com/cuyahoga-county/index.ssf/2015/03/armond_budish_debt_concerns_put_some_cuyahoga_county_projects_on_hold.html


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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Developers are at home on former school sites

Three builders see great potential in budding projects in Lakewood, Fairview Park and Seven Hills

By STAN BULLARD

May 03, 2015 4:30 AM

 

Real estate developer Tom Kuluris exudes excitement as he talks about his latest project: 40 townhouses on the site of the former McKinley Elementary School, 1381 W. Clifton Blvd. in Lakewood.

 

It's not just enthusiasm about the brick, stone and design of the townhouses, which Kuluris plans to start constructing this summer.

 

“I went to McKinley. I've spent a big part of my life near this property,” said the president of Westlake-based Liberty Development Co. “My parents and grandmother live nearby, and I live in Lakewood, too.”

 

Liberty's Lakewood residential project is one of three that different real estate developers are planning to erect on former elementary school sites in Cleveland suburbs.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150503/SUB1/305039978/developers-are-at-home-on-former-school-sites


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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I've always liked this type of development idea. With most suburbs, and Cuyahoga County as a whole, pretty much built out, its a great opportunity to give people the option of modern, up to date housing without having to go to Aurora or Macedonia or Brunstucky. If people can't find the options to stay in or move to the city of Cleveland, then keeping them in Cuyahoga County and stopping that outflow of people is the next best thing.

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Developers are at home on former school sites

Three builders see great potential in budding projects in Lakewood, Fairview Park and Seven Hills

By STAN BULLARD

May 03, 2015 4:30 AM

 

Real estate developer Tom Kuluris exudes excitement as he talks about his latest project: 40 townhouses on the site of the former McKinley Elementary School, 1381 W. Clifton Blvd. in Lakewood.

 

It's not just enthusiasm about the brick, stone and design of the townhouses, which Kuluris plans to start constructing this summer.

 

“I went to McKinley. I've spent a big part of my life near this property,” said the president of Westlake-based Liberty Development Co. “My parents and grandmother live nearby, and I live in Lakewood, too.”

 

Liberty's Lakewood residential project is one of three that different real estate developers are planning to erect on former elementary school sites in Cleveland suburbs.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150503/SUB1/305039978/developers-are-at-home-on-former-school-sites

 

They need to be very careful developing on school sites that were built during the "baby boom".  They may have been industrial or dump sites in the past.

 

That's how Love Canal happened.  The Niagara Falls Board of Education pressured Hooker Chemical to sell them that land for schools, and they proceeded to sell some remainder to developers.

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St. Vincent Charity Medical Center is regaining its health

Catholic hospital has shed debt and is emphasizing strengths

May 17, 2015

By TIMOTHY MAGAW 

 

Shortly after Dr. David Perse’s took over as president and CEO of St. Vincent Charity Medical Center in the spring of 2011, the 150-year-old hospital stomached a multimillion-dollar loss in a single month.

 

The organization had been losing money for some time, but that was an especially brutal month in the eyes of the new administrator, who had left the fiscally strong Cleveland Clinic to help engineer the turnaround of the cash-strapped Catholic hospital in downtown Cleveland.

 

“That gave me pause,” said Perse, the former president of the Clinic’s Lutheran Hospital, about St. Vincent’s troubles. “But I’m a one-foot-in-front-of-the-other kind of guy. … It’s daunting, but I think everything’s fixable. You just have to fix it.”

 

And begun to fix it he has. Since his arrival, the hospital has inched its way back into the black after finishing 2011 — before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization — with a $10 million loss.

 

MORE:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20150517/NEWS/150519848/st-vincent-charity-medical-center-is-regaining-its-health


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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Vintage Cleveland banks: Inside the ornate temples of commerce that made downtown rich (photos)

By Laura DeMarco, The Plain Dealer

on May 14, 2015 at 8:01 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 8:55 AM

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The magnificent building at the corner of East Ninth Street and Euclid Avenue didn't always sell prepared meals, wine and cheese.

 

Nor was the sleek tower next to it always home to a chic hotel and trendy underground bar.

 

Not so long ago, the former Cleveland Trust/Ameritrust rotunda and tower were the centers of banking and commerce in Cleveland. And, two of the most architecturally remarkable bank buildings in a city once rich with notable banks – emphasis on rich.

 

MORE:

http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2015/05/vintage_cleveland_banks_inside.html


"Now you're not naive enough to think we're living in a democracy, are you Buddy? It's the free market. And you're a part of it." -- Gordon Gekko.

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Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html

 

Does NEOMG ever use a more than remotely relevant picture anymore?

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Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html

 

I thought this was a great story, poorly constructed.  This was an important fact that I wish they would have further explained.

"Reserve Square Apartments are attracting young professionals and graduate students from CSU and Case, as well as Clinic residents," Deemer continues. "The Residences at 1717 is attracting everyone: young professionals, baby boomers and families.

 

What is the percentage of families moving into downtown?  That would totally debunk the myth that once people with children are school age, they've move to the burbs.

 

Does NEOMG ever use a more than remotely relevant picture anymore?

 

The obvious answer is NO!  The photos rarely match the story.

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Does NEOMG ever use a more than remotely relevant picture anymore?

 

Yeah, that's by far my least favorite picture of Cleveland. It's just bad.

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"Reserve Square Apartments are attracting young professionals and graduate students from CSU and Case, as well as Clinic residents," Deemer continues. "The Residences at 1717 is attracting everyone: young professionals, baby boomers and families.

What is the percentage of families moving into downtown?  That would totally debunk the myth that once people with children are school age, they've move to the burbs.

 

He's a salesman.  He might as well work for the leasing agent, and if I'm not mistaken about how the DCA is funded, he basically does. 

 

If two couples who work downtown and whose kids are starting at Iggy this fall move there, technically that's "families".  I'm not saying the facts are at that extreme, but keep it in mind.

 

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Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html

 

Does NEOMG ever use a more than remotely relevant picture anymore?

If I recall their photography division experienced drastic cuts, and a good amount of them use smart phones for photographs. This is probably why they don't use relevant photos. Although a quick google search wouldn't hurt.

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"Reserve Square Apartments are attracting young professionals and graduate students from CSU and Case, as well as Clinic residents," Deemer continues. "The Residences at 1717 is attracting everyone: young professionals, baby boomers and families.

What is the percentage of families moving into downtown?  That would totally debunk the myth that once people with children are school age, they've move to the burbs.

 

He's a salesman.  He might as well work for the leasing agent, and if I'm not mistaken about how the DCA is funded, he basically does. 

 

If two couples who work downtown and whose kids are starting at Iggy this fall move there, technically that's "families".  I'm not saying the facts are at that extreme, but keep it in mind.

 

 

I know that.  That is is his job!  He's suppose to sell downtown and work with other downtown company's, agencies, BIDs, city and county departments to continue the momentum in the heart of the city.  Granted property owners pay into a fund to support the DCA

 

Your guess is why I wish they would have further discussed the number of "families" living in downtown.  As well as where people work and where their children attend school.

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"Reserve Square Apartments are attracting young professionals and graduate students from CSU and Case, as well as Clinic residents," Deemer continues. "The Residences at 1717 is attracting everyone: young professionals, baby boomers and families.

What is the percentage of families moving into downtown?  That would totally debunk the myth that once people with children are school age, they've move to the burbs.

 

He's a salesman.  He might as well work for the leasing agent, and if I'm not mistaken about how the DCA is funded, he basically does. 

 

If two couples who work downtown and whose kids are starting at Iggy this fall move there, technically that's "families".  I'm not saying the facts are at that extreme, but keep it in mind.

 

 

I know that.  That is is his job!  He's suppose to sell downtown and work with other downtown company's, agencies, BIDs, city and county departments to continue the momentum in the heart of the city.  Granted property owners pay into a fund to support the DCA

 

Your guess is why I wish they would have further discussed the number of "families" living in downtown.  As well as where people work and where their children attend school.

 

Exactly, that's his job. 

 

My point is if what you're hoping for is true, he'd spell that out.  If what I suspect is true, he'd present the information exactly as he did.

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"Reserve Square Apartments are attracting young professionals and graduate students from CSU and Case, as well as Clinic residents," Deemer continues. "The Residences at 1717 is attracting everyone: young professionals, baby boomers and families.

What is the percentage of families moving into downtown?  That would totally debunk the myth that once people with children are school age, they've move to the burbs.

 

He's a salesman.  He might as well work for the leasing agent, and if I'm not mistaken about how the DCA is funded, he basically does. 

 

If two couples who work downtown and whose kids are starting at Iggy this fall move there, technically that's "families".  I'm not saying the facts are at that extreme, but keep it in mind.

 

 

I know that.  That is is his job!  He's suppose to sell downtown and work with other downtown company's, agencies, BIDs, city and county departments to continue the momentum in the heart of the city.  Granted property owners pay into a fund to support the DCA

 

Your guess is why I wish they would have further discussed the number of "families" living in downtown.  As well as where people work and where their children attend school.

 

Exactly, that's his job. 

 

My point is if what you're hoping for is true, he'd spell that out.  If what I suspect is true, he'd present the information exactly as he did.

 

What I'm looking for is a breakdown of residents in downtown.  Singles, couples, families, etc.  That would tell the success of downtown living

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Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html

 

I thought this was a great story, poorly constructed.  This was an important fact that I wish they would have further explained.

 

Well, it's a paid placement or "Sponsor Content" so that's probably why.

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Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html

 

I thought this was a great story, poorly constructed.  This was an important fact that I wish they would have further explained.

 

Well, it's a paid placement or "Sponsor Content" so that's probably why.

Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html

 

I thought this was a great story, poorly constructed.  This was an important fact that I wish they would have further explained.

 

Well, it's a paid placement or "Sponsor Content" so that's probably why.

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pub/fedaa-jerai/37/995/189

 

Interesting....

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Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html

 

I thought this was a great story, poorly constructed.  This was an important fact that I wish they would have further explained.

 

Well, it's a paid placement or "Sponsor Content" so that's probably why.

Downtown's NineTwelve District Is Cleveland's Latest Success Story

By Fedaa Jerai

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 14, 2015 at 10:36 AM

 

A recession and a global financial crisis greatly affected Cleveland's Financial District. But rather than allow a once great section of the city to wither away, Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) has been spearheading an effort to rebrand and breathe new life into what is now being called the NineTwelve District. From business relocation to new residences, and from food trucks to retail shops, the NineTwelve District is becoming one of Cleveland's most inspiring comeback stories.

 

The NineTwelve District encompasses the area between East 9th and East 12th streets and Euclid and Lakeside avenues. According to DCA, this is already downtown's most populated area, with 3,800 residents and more apartments in the works. Ten corporate headquarters relocated to the area between 2011 and 2015. Retail options are booming, with the new Heinen's Grocery Store at East 9th and Euclid being one of the brightest examples. Renovated Perk Plaza serves as the district's greenspace and common area.

 

MORE:

http://blog.cleveland.com/downtown_cleveland_alliance/2015/05/downtowns_ninetwelve_district.html

 

I thought this was a great story, poorly constructed.  This was an important fact that I wish they would have further explained.

 

Well, it's a paid placement or "Sponsor Content" so that's probably why.

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pub/fedaa-jerai/37/995/189

 

Interesting....

 

They took her name off of it...

 

By Northeast Ohio Media Group Marketing Staff

on May 14, 2015 at 10:23 AM, updated May 19, 2015 at 10:49 AM

 

 

Advertisement pieces written by someone who probably has never seen Downtown Cleveland...

 

 

 

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