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Columbus: Historic Photos

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i love that set of pictures--thanks for adding the present day with it.

 

one thing i always found interesting about them is how few trees there were on high street--its almost devoid of them. It is something urbanists take very seriously today, but it wasn't necessary for urbanism to be successful 100 years ago

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Next is Spring and High.  There is quite literally nothing left from 1914. 

 

I wonder if William Green's 'crown' was an 80's homage to that old hotel.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Next is Spring and High.  There is quite literally nothing left from 1914. 

 

I wonder if William Green's 'crown' was an 80's homage to that old hotel.

 

Maybe.  That was the Chittenden Hotel and I believe it lasted until the Nationwide complex was built in the 1980s.  Same for a lot of that block. 

 

 

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I thought the Chittenden burnt down...

 

I think the original one did, back in 1893.  The one in the photo was built in 1895 and remained open until 1972. 

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Very cool to see the before and after... Looking at old photos of our cities can be so depressing lol...

 

Yeah, it is.  It looked more like a city 100 years ago than it does now with the drastic difference in street level activity and density.  Just goes to show that bigger buildings don't necessarily add much beyond a skyline.

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By happenstance, I ran across a Cornell University website that included several photos of the 1885 Franklin County Courthouse not long before it was demolished in 1974. I thought they were worth sharing.

 

Original construction

pc-1.jpg

 

Early on, the window patterns were changed on the wings. I would guess that there were large courtrooms at either end that were subdivided into two floors.

pc.jpg

 

Unfortunately, the Second Empire building was stripped of its tower and mansard roof at some point005509.jpg

 

005507.jpg

 

005506.jpg

 

005505.jpg

 

Today, five columns from the building are all that remains. A plaza, Dorian Commons, exists on the old courthouse site.

photo.jpg

 

Perhaps Franklin County would still have a historic courthouse if a new courthouse was constructed as part of the Civic Center in the 1920s/30s.

 

Cornell site: http://library24.library.cornell.edu:8280/luna/servlet/view/all/where/373%20S.%20High%20Street%20(Columbus,%20Ohio)/when/1885-1887

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wow, would love to see interiors. After, the butchering, might as well tear the sucker down.

Of course, if it was in Cincinnati, they would have burned it down...

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^Honestly, I think you could have scrubbed the whole thing and removed the "boxes" on the roof where the old mansards were and you would have had a decent, landmark building.

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I never saw pictures of the 1960s version, sans mansard. That's horrible. And now we have yet another new courthouse that would be right at home along any Outerbelt interchange -- a building suitable for a Dunder-Mifflin regional headquarters.

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What a beauty!  Further proof that our more ornate structures tended not to survive.  I assume the cost to maintain them caused their devolution into bastardized remodelings and eventually pulverized lumber, limestone and marble.  Sad.

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^It was located at the Southeast corner of Mound and High, where Dorian Commons exists today. I believe the annex building at Fulton and High had been constructed along site it prior to demolition.

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I remember this well.  The building exterior was still imposing, even though it was bastardized with the horrific stucco boxes in place of the mansards.  The interior was still impressive, and largely intact.  There was a fantastic staircase and an amazing antique elevator. I went there a few times.  The opposite side of High St was a mess of wooden one floor ramshackle offices painted battleship gray.  Depressing would be a kind description.

 

Quite a few people were disappointed when the old courthouse was torn down, many wanting to have it restored to original state.  Their pleas fell on deaf ears.  The Hall of Justice was a sad replacement, looking dated and adding nothing to downtown. 

 

The old county jail was just around the corner on Fulton.  It was a spooky looking building resembling a medieval dungeon. 

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Now I'm even MORE sad at that Indianapolis one!


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Looks like both buildings had their towers removed. Was there some defect that prevented this sort of architecture from surviving?

 

i don't think the building's tower was removed in Indy - just a different angle.

 

Also, i happen to think the defect lies elsewhere, not in the architecture...

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^If you scroll over, you can see a portion of Marion County's tower was removed as well.

 

Many courthouse towers have been removed over the years (Grant Co, IN; Randolph Co, IN; Porter Co, IN; Lorain Co, OH; Defiance Co, OH; Jefferson Co, OH; and Clark Co, OH; are some I can think of off hand); sometimes it was modernization, sometimes fire or storm, sometimes a structural issue. I would not be surprised if historic buildings were not properly engineered, but many times that certainly meant that they were over-engineered.

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10TV posted a video from their video vault documenting the destruction of one of Columbus' lost treasures.

 

From their 10tv.com:

 

Video Vault: The Storied Past Of The Greater Columbus Convention Center

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio - In 1965, Columbus’ Union Station was seeing little use.  More than 10 years later, demolition of the 80-year-old building began.  The demolition would make way for Battelle Hall, which would later become part of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, the site of this weekend’s Arnold Sports Festival.

 

The main archway of Union Station was the only piece to be saved and now overlooks a park across from Nationwide Arena.

http://www.10tv.com/content/sections/video/index.html?ooid=ZyZDd4azrISpCbhuhn-bEEYxfmNB-poY&cmpid=share

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Fantastic!  Thank you.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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We could have had a convention center that looked like that. It was one of the three choices.

 

Really? I didn't know that. Who in the Hell chose the monstrosity that we got stuck with?

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BTW, some have asked me exactly where the station was. Union Station was a strange design because it had a colonnade facade along High Street (since mimicked by the cap over I-670). But the actual station building was off High Street, reached by a roadway and a walkway.

 

Looking south along High Street toward downtown.....

Columbus_Union_Station_(third_building).JPG

 

Here's a copyrighted graphic showing the High Street facade with the station building and accessways between them.....

http://www.artistmichaeldickinson.com/ImagesLithographs/Closeups/UnionStationH.JPG

 

Here is a graphic from the terrific site columbusrailroads.org if you want to learn about Columbus' railroad history.....

 

Labels are here: http://tinyurl.com/l5sy3u4

cus%20&%20west.jpg


"Fascism begins the moment a ruling class, fearing the people may use their political democracy to gain economic democracy, begins to destroy political democracy in order to retain its power of exploitation and special privilege." -- Tommy Douglas, Scottish-born Canadian Baptist minister and the seventh Premier of Saskatchewan

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We could have had a convention center that looked like that. It was one of the three choices.

 

Really? I didn't know that. Who in the Hell chose the monstrosity that we got stuck with?

 

I don't remember. The Dispatch covered the proceedings obviously. The renderings aren't on the internet at all. Apparently the OSU library system has those at least.

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Columbus really had a lot of stations. There was one just west of Union Station, one just east of the 670 and 71 interchange, one in Franklinton and a small one at Grandview.

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Wow, that is a really weird design...

 

The reason why it was set east of High Street like that is because the busiest passenger rail service at Columbus, the Pennsylvania Railroad, had its St. Louis-New York City mainline curve southwest of High Street. So having the main station building be placed right on High or even underneath it wasn't possible. Railroads often placed stations where it best suited their operations, rather than customers. Of course, many times a city built up around a station wherever it was located. That didn't happen at Columbus because of the many freight houses surrounding it and I think the city felt the station colonnade along High Street was sufficient integration in the urbanscape. One place there a city didn't build up around a station was Buffalo's Central Station, which was built in 1929 several miles east of downtown. I suspect a second downtown would have risen around that station had it been built a decade earlier. But the Great Depression, followed by WWII followed by the postwar sprawl all be prevented Buffalo's station area from becoming anything resembling a supportive land use.


"Fascism begins the moment a ruling class, fearing the people may use their political democracy to gain economic democracy, begins to destroy political democracy in order to retain its power of exploitation and special privilege." -- Tommy Douglas, Scottish-born Canadian Baptist minister and the seventh Premier of Saskatchewan

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