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Cleveland: General Business & Economic News

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Obviously some hard right wing commentary by Mr Klotkin there, the kind that is never likely to favor this region.  However I agree with his nutshell take on what Cleveland should and shouldn't do.  We are too eager to write off our base of industrial knowledge, and we expect too much from home-run touristy projects.  He may have misunderstood the MM/CC project, if that's what he's referring to, because the MM part is a much bigger deal that the CC part.  That isn't about tourism, it's about hi-tech manufacturing.         

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Obviously some hard right wing commentary by Mr Klotkin there, the kind that is never likely to favor this region.  However I agree with his nutshell take on what Cleveland should and shouldn't do.  We are too eager to write off our base of industrial knowledge, and we expect too much from home-run touristy projects. He may have misunderstood the MM/CC project, if that's what he's referring to, because the MM part is a much bigger deal that the CC part.  That isn't about tourism, it's about hi-tech manufacturing.         

 

We??  There is not silver bullet, for any city.  Like the general population, I don't feel you should assume that is how the majority of people in the city/county/region feel.

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Obviously some hard right wing commentary by Mr Klotkin there, the kind that is never likely to favor this region. However I agree with his nutshell take on what Cleveland should and shouldn't do. We are too eager to write off our base of industrial knowledge, and we expect too much from home-run touristy projects. He may have misunderstood the MM/CC project, if that's what he's referring to, because the MM part is a much bigger deal that the CC part. That isn't about tourism, it's about hi-tech manufacturing.  

 

We?? There is not silver bullet, for any city. Like the general population, I don't feel you should assume that is how the majority of people in the city/county/region feel.

 

I'm only talking about the leadership.  I have no idea what the general population thinks.  The leadership can be judged on their public statements, the ideas they dismiss and the ideas they put their weight behind.  Ideas that bubble to the surface and get serious consideration tend to be a bit home-run touristy.  Prime example is Campbell's lakefront plan.  It had a merry-go-round. 

 

Several other outdoor recreational projects, of various types and scales, have gotten serious play.  While I like most of these projects a lot, I think the resources could be better spent.  We can't compete with Denver or Utah or NC in terms of outdoor recreation.  So why not instead focus on what we can do well, which is to provide a classic urban experience.  We also make machine parts and we're good at it. 

 

The tendency to lean on touristy projects is probably true everywhere, but I think the author was pointing out that these solutions are even less appropriate here because they play to regional weaknesses instead of strengths.  It's a theory and I think it has some merit.

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The tendency to lean on touristy projects is probably true everywhere, but I think the author was pointing out that these solutions are even less appropriate here because they play to regional weaknesses instead of strengths. It's a theory and I think it has some merit.

 

I agree, to a certain extent. I don't think the region should be focusing so much on getting people to like us. Instead, stand confidently on the assets and take pride. People will believe in the region if you truly do and it's not just an act of desperation.

 

On the whole manufacturing side of things, I think the region should play to those strengths, too. That is a good thing. However, the diversification of the economy is also a good thing, and while I don't see Cleveland as becoming a major tourism spot anytime soon (aside from maybe special events like sports games, etc), I thnk it should do what it can to sell itself as such. There are great strengths in the area. Why not tell people about those? But I do agree that the major focus should not be placed on selling it as a tourism spot.

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Obviously some hard right wing commentary by Mr Klotkin there, the kind that is never likely to favor this region.  However I agree with his nutshell take on what Cleveland should and shouldn't do.  We are too eager to write off our base of industrial knowledge, and we expect too much from home-run touristy projects. He may have misunderstood the MM/CC project, if that's what he's referring to, because the MM part is a much bigger deal that the CC part.  That isn't about tourism, it's about hi-tech manufacturing.         

 

We??  There is not silver bullet, for any city.  Like the general population, I don't feel you should assume that is how the majority of people in the city/county/region feel.

 

I'm only talking about the leadership.  I have no idea what the general population thinks.  The leadership can be judged on their public statements, the ideas they dismiss and the ideas they put their weight behind.  Ideas that bubble to the surface and get serious consideration tend to be a bit home-run touristy.  Prime example is Campbell's lakefront plan.  It had a merry-go-round. 

Several other outdoor recreational projects, of various types and scales, have gotten serious play.  While I like most of these projects a lot, I think the resources could be better spent.  We can't compete with Denver or Utah or NC in terms of outdoor recreation.  So why not instead focus on what we can do well, which is to provide a classic urban experience.  We also make machine parts and we're good at it. 

 

The tendency to lean on touristy projects is probably true everywhere, but I think the author was pointing out that these solutions are even less appropriate here because they play to regional weaknesses instead of strengths.  It's a theory and I think it has some merit.

 

It had a merry go round to attract younger children and families.  That was smart thinking and planning for the lakefront.  IIRC, that merry go round was to be a historic merry go round relocated from elsewhere.

 

downtown and the lakefront cannot be all about what adults want.  We have to cultivate ideas for multiple uses and multiple generations.

 

Having that playground/merry go round does the following: 

  • Give a reason for families with small children to come
  • Provides the family with an additional reason to connect with the lakefront and downtown
  • provides opportunity for the family to want to move closer to the lakefront/downtown
  • provides memories to be passed on about coming to said merry go round.

We cannot compete with UT or NC, this from "mr optimistic", that BS!  WE have plenty of parks and year round outdoor activities.  The problem is funding for programing, amenties and upgrading in those parks.

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The problem with spending money on a merry-go-round is that the lack of one is not the #1, #2, or #435 top reason why people don't want to raise kids in the inner city.  To build the merry-go-round anyway is to display ignorance of how serious the other problems (safety, schools, retail, housing stock) truly are.

 

I'm optimistic about the success of true urban development in Cleveland.  I'm not optimistic about our being able to compete with mountainous or coastal regions in terms of outdoor recreation.  It will never be an effective selling point, not when they have us so clearly beat.  I would refer you to some of the "moving to Cleveland from the west" discussion last week.

 

I'm not saying outdoor life is a liability here.  It's fine.  I'm saying it will never be a grand lever of recovery for us.  We're spending a lot of scarce money upgrading and planning for upgrades of this general nature, when we ought to be focused on rebuilding our major city as a major city.

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The problem with spending money on a merry-go-round is that the lack of one is not the #1, #2, or #435 top reason why people don't want to raise kids in the inner city.  To build the merry-go-round anyway is to display ignorance of how serious the other problems (safety, schools, retail, housing stock) truly are.

 

I'm optimistic about the success of true urban development in Cleveland.  I'm not optimistic about our being able to compete with mountainous or coastal regions in terms of outdoor recreation.  It will never be an effective selling point, not when they have us so clearly beat.  I would refer you to some of the "moving to Cleveland from the west" discussion last week.

 

I'm not saying outdoor life is liability here.  It's fine.  I'm saying it will never be a grand lever of recovery for us.  We're spending a lot of scarce money upgrading and planning for upgrades in this area, when we ought to be focused on rebuilding our major city as a major city.

 

and reconnecting the citizens with the lakefront is a part of that.

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Right.  I agree.  We should do that reconnecting by means of dense mixed-use urban development, rather than with trinkets and more green space.  We also can't forget how important the lake has been and will be economically.  I think moving the port to 55th and focusing on modern industry in that immediate vicinity is the best lakefront idea I've yet heard.  Outside of that area, especially on the former port grounds, we get to build acres and acres of new city.  All of that, I think, beats the heck out of lining up some trite "family" attractions.

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Right.  I agree.  We should do that reconnecting by means of dense mixed-use urban development, rather than with trinkets and more green space.  We also can't forget how important the lake has been and will be economically.  I think moving the port to 55th and focusing on modern industry in that immediate vicinity is the best lakefront idea I've yet heard.  Outside of that area, especially on the former port grounds, we get to build acres and acres of new city.  All of that, I think, beats the heck out of lining up some trite "family" attractions.

 

Building family and multi use attractions along with housing, hotels and retail near CBS is the point.  How can you be against that?

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How can you be against that?

 

I was struck by lightning.

 

Publicized plans seem to focus on the cliched "attractions" instead of the meat and potatoes of building city for city's sake.  We have enough recreational options.  We have enough to make comparable cities jeolous, yet we're still sinking.  We need to start replacing all the big city we've ripped out.  The kind of outsiders who could be willing to pioneer our urban revival are looking for a big city feel, and only by building big city where we once had it can we truly compete to have them move here.  Quality of life issues are big too, and resources spent on additional cutesy amenities are resources that could have been used on sorely lacking basic services. 

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Publicized plans seem to focus on the cliched "attractions" instead of the meat and potatoes of building city for city's sake. We have enough recreational options. We have enough to make comparable cities jeolous, yet we're still sinking. We need to start replacing all the big city we've ripped out. The kind of outsiders who could be willing to pioneer our urban revival are looking for a big city feel, and only by building big city where we once had it can we truly compete to have them move here. Quality of life issues are big too, and resources spent on additional cutesy amenities are resources that could have been used on sorely lacking basic services.  

 

I agree.

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Cleveland needs to attract people to LIVE in the city, not just visit.  Yes, visiting is nice.  But I think we need to be realistic when comparing it to actually having people living here.  We have lost over 500,000 in a half century. 

 

Hell, look at Gateway.  Yes, it's brought a lot of people into the city, but has the city gained in population since it was built?  No.   

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Cleveland needs to attract people to LIVE in the city, not just visit.  Yes, visiting is nice.  But I think we need to be realistic when comparing it to actually having people living here.  We have lost over 500,000 in a half century. 

 

Hell, look at Gateway.  Yes, it's brought a lot of people into the city, but has the city gained in population since it was built?  No.   

 

That why I made the statement about using the money from the CC to invest in all parts of teh city not downtown.  Not everyone wants to live in a condo downtown.

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Yeah, but proximity to a thriving Downtown is the main attraction for living in any of Cleveland's neighborhoods.  That same thriving Downtown's payroll, sales, and property taxes are what pays for nearly all of the city's budget.  Strengthen Downtown and we will strengthen the entire city.  Or spread the peanut butter even across the city, starving Downtown for resources, and watch the entire city continue to get poorer.

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Yeah, but proximity to a thriving Downtown is the main attraction for living in any of Cleveland's neighborhoods. That same thriving Downtown's payroll, sales, and property taxes are what pays for nearly all of the city's budget. Strengthen Downtown and we will strengthen the entire city. Or spread the peanut butter even across the city, starving Downtown for resources, and watch the entire city continue to get poorer.

 

I agree.  Inner city neighborhoods were built to be dependent on downtown.  They were built on the assumption of a strong downtown.  Ours no longer fills its role as a commercial center and as a result none of the neighborhoods can prosper.  I would continue to target resources toward downtown until it's up and running again.  I would spend most of my neighborhood money on transit to link them with downtown in the manner originally intended. 

 

In short, the way forward is to be a big city again.

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Yeah, but proximity to a thriving Downtown is the main attraction for living in any of Cleveland's neighborhoods.  That same thriving Downtown's payroll, sales, and property taxes are what pays for nearly all of the city's budget.  Strengthen Downtown and we will strengthen the entire city.  Or spread the peanut butter even across the city, starving Downtown for resources, and watch the entire city continue to get poorer.

 

I think the folks in ward 1,2,3 10,11 ,18,19 & 20 would disagree.  I don't agree and I love downtown.

 

Why not invest money in Hough, Fairfax as downtown has many more revenue resourses or continue to bridge the gap between OC and DS?

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What would investing money in Hough do?  Where would you invest it?  And I am not saying this is a jerk, I'm curious what your ideas would be for where the money should go. 

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What would investing money in Hough do?  Where would you invest it?  And I am not saying this is a jerk, I'm curious what your ideas would be for where the money should go. 

 

Since University Circle is going to expand why not market the area.  Help with developing a CDC and bring in residents, everyday retail business, and maintence of current structures, streets etc.  Every ward could use that.

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Most people, if asked, are likely to want money spent right next door to their house as opposed to anywhere else.  That doesn't make it the best idea.  Another problem is that scant resources can be hard to spread out so far with any real effect. 

 

The mayor is currently going the spread-it-out route, and several years back he released a set of goals and planned investments for each neighborhood.  You can find it on the city's website.  While I like all the goals, the actual investments are so dinky in each one that it won't change a thing.  IIRC the biggest thing on the list is the Gordon Square street/utility upgrade.  That one's not bad, but they pretty much go downhill from there.  Too minor to have significant effects.  Plus, they don't solve our overarching structural problems, like poor services and a dysfunctional downtown.

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Yeah, it seemed like a bunch of minor things, like improved garbage pick up, snow removal, etc.  Not saying these things aren't nice, but certainly seem like band-aids.

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Yeah, it seemed like a bunch of minor things, like improved garbage pick up, snow removal, etc. Not saying these things aren't nice, but certainly seem like band-aids.

 

Those seem at least somewhat worthwhile.  Not as helpful as improving lighting and police presence, but at least they address quality of life.  I was talking more about physical investments in the neighborhoods.  I remember several instances of let's add green space and bike/hiking paths.  Don't get me wrong, these aren't bad ideas at all.  Well, I could do without any more green space.  But we shouldn't be spending time and energy on those sorts of things before addressing all the decrepit buildings and lawlessness.

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Guys... I've been trying to give this thread a lot of leeway... but this is about General Economic News released... not a "What we all think can fix the city" thread...  This happens every time someone posts one of those ridiculous forbes lists...

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What would investing money in Hough do? Where would you invest it? And I am not saying this is a jerk, I'm curious what your ideas would be for where the money should go.

 

Since University Circle is going to expand why not market the area. Help with developing a CDC and bring in residents, everyday retail business, and maintence of current structures, streets etc. Every ward could use that.

 

These things are already being done.  Every inch of this city is covered by a CDC, sometimes more than one.  There's little market for those houses being built in Hough or the others you mentioned, however.  And few businesses interested in operating in the neighborhoods.  At any rate, if most of the money comes from Downtown, why shouldn't most of it get reinvested in Downtown?  That could grow the pie for the rest of the neighborhoods to eat from.

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Excellent conversation, and for once I am on 327 side on this one.  Without a strong central core that sustains property tax revenue from major corporations, the rest of the city is dead.  It's like when you are low on cash you don't spend money on small trinkets to get by, you should be saving and investing in major, long term ideas that will make you the money to evenutally get those little bonuses (new park or merry go round) that you want.

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Guys... I've been trying to give this thread a lot of leeway... but this is about General Economic News released... not a "What we all think can fix the city" thread... This happens every time someone posts one of those ridiculous forbes lists...

 

Yes - this thread has had some more cerebral discussion but folks, it's "Cleveland: General Business/Economic News/Events".

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An hour ago there were 15 people reading this discussion, regardless of thread title.  This may or may not work, but I'll try making a separate thread for it.

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If a thread goes off topic with 15,000 people reading, it's STILL going off topic. I love how people say they respect this forum and how it's moderated - well guess how that came to be? It's not just a zero-tolerance for spam, or for blatant trolling - it's also for keeping threads organized and making information easy to find. When a thread is taken off-topic, it f#cks that latter part up - am I clear?

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Not backtalk, just a window on my thinking:  I'm still working on my topic boundary recognition.  It's more of an art than a science.  Three items are listed in the title of this thread and General Business is one of them.  It didn't seem like a project-specific thread.  These posts all revolved around getting businesses to stay or relocate here, so it seemed OK on the surface.

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General Buisness or Economic News... not let's take a ridiculous forbes list and spin off on how to turn the city around...

 

This is an information thread.

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It's not the most exciting news but 125 jobs in this economy sounds pretty good

 

Collectcorp plans call center in Middleburg Heights

 

 

12:53 pm, May 5, 2009

 

Another call center company soon will be turning on the phones in Northeast Ohio.

 

Collectcorp, a Phoenix-based debt collections firm, plans to open a call center in Middleburg Heights in mid-July that will employ 125 and have a payroll of at least $3.1 million, according to Team Northeast Ohio, the business expansion organization.

 

More at

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20090505/FREE/905059954

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Northeast Ohio construction projects halted after laborers union contract talks break down

Posted by Olivera Perkins/Plain Dealer Reporter May 06, 2009 21:01PM

 

The local building laborers union has stopped work on several construction projects in Northeast Ohio after contract negotiations with a contractors' group broke down.

Job sites went silent this week after Local 310 of the Laborers' International Union of North America couldn't reach a contract agreement with the Construction Employers Association. The previous contract, covering about 2,000 workers, expired April 30.

 

continued at>>>>

 

Plain Dealer reporter Thomas Ott contributed to this story.

http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2009/05/northeast_ohio_construction_pr.html

 

 

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I hope this is the right thread to put this in, I'm still getting the hang of it. Anyway, Cleveland/Cincinnati finally made a positive list :clap:

 

Top 10 Cities for New Grads

As Class of 2009 feels pinch, job searches expand

By Kate Lorenz, CareerBuilder.com editor

 

Top cities for new grads

 

While many new grads tend to look for jobs near their college or hometowns, scores of them are considering locations they might not have when they entered school four or five years ago.

 

"Given the current economy, new grads looking to relocate are becoming increasingly concerned with the cost of living as they are faced with more competition for jobs than seen in previous years," said Tammy Kotula, public relations and promotions manager at Apartments.com. "With these very real concerns weighing on the minds of many, two leading online resources for apartments and jobs have come together to paint a realistic landscape of both the job market and cost of living in the most popular cities for young adults after college."

 

For new grads who plan to expand their job searches beyond their college or hometowns, Apartments.com and CBcampus.com just released the "Top 10 Best Cities for Recent College Graduates." The list is based on the ranking of the top U.S. cities with the highest concentration of young adults (age 20 - 24) from the U.S. Census Bureau (2006), inventory of jobs requiring less than one year of experience from CBcampus.com (2009) and the average cost of rent for a one bedroom apartment from Apartments.com (2009).

 

According to Apartments.com and CBcampus.com, the top 10 cities for new grads are: 

 

1.  Indianapolis

Average rent:* $625

 

Popular entry-level categories:** sales, customer service, health care

 

2.  Philadelphia               

Average rent: $1,034

Popular entry-level categories: sales, customer service, management

 

3.  Baltimore     

Average rent: $1,130

Popular entry-level categories: sales, customer service, health care

 

4.  Cincinnati     

Average rent: $691

Popular entry-level categories: sales, customer service, health care

 

5.  Cleveland

Average rent: $686

 

Popular entry-level categories: sales, marketing, customer service

 

6.  New York     

Average rent: $1,548

Popular entry-level categories: sales, customer service, admin-clerical

 

7.  Phoenix       

Average rent: $747

Popular entry-level categories: sales, customer service, marketing

 

8.  Denver         

Average rent: $877

Popular entry-level categories: sales, customer service, health care

 

9.  Chicago         

Average rent: $1,133

Popular entry-level categories: sales, marketing, customer service

 

10.  San Antonio             

Average rent: $696

Popular entry-level categories: sales, customer service, management

 

http://msn.careerbuilder.com/Article/MSN-1908-College-Internships-First-Jobs-Top-10-Cities-for-New-Grads/?sc_extcmp=JS_1908_home1&SiteId=cbmsnhp41908&ArticleID=1908&GT1=23000&cbRecursionCnt=1&cbsid=889bc219704446bbb5f3de557806d91b-295450774-KB-5

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Tis the season:

 

 

Cleveland-area farmers markets open for business near you

by Debbi Snook / Plain Dealer Reporter

Monday May 11, 2009, 2:00 PM

 

medium_veggies.jpg

PEGGY TURBETT / PLAIN DEALER

 

After talking to the managers of 44 regional farmers markets, I got off the phone, stepped away from the keyboard and wondered: How can I take a week of vacation to visit a different one every day?

 

The idea of eating locally is in full bloom in Northeast Ohio. Farmers markets here are growing out of their original sites, adding services, music and other forms of entertainment. They are looking a whole lot more like community festivals.

 

 

More at

http://www.cleveland.com/taste/index.ssf/2009/05/clevelandarea_farmers_markets.html

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What happened to the WHD market? Why did that one close? :(

 

Probably because you can get a much better selection from the West Side Market. I see a lot of people walking over the bridge on saturday mornings to WSM.

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They hosted that thing on thursday evening's outside of constantino's.  it was only a couple stands of produce. never seemed to catch on.  I went once... and then thought... yeah... i can get this at the market on saturdays.

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What happened to the WHD market? Why did that one close? :(

 

Probably because you can get a much better selection from the West Side Market. I see a lot of people walking over the bridge on saturday mornings to WSM.

 

That would be me on most saturdays

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From IDEASTREAM:

 

http://www.wcpn.org/WCPN/news/26250/

 

Replace a Toilet Flapper Lately? New NE Ohio Company Has a Product to Make that Job Obsolete

 

Northeast Ohio has given birth to many inventions over the years, but here's one with the potential to be well, very practical. ideastream®'s Mhari Saito spoke with the inventors of a product that claims to solve the age-old problem of leaky toilet flappers.

 

wally_n_accordion_200p.jpg

 

Entrepreneur Wally Berry’s career has come a long way..... from running insurance companies… to showing people how many golf balls his new invention can flush down a toilet.

 

Wally Berry: On Sept. 1st, the new requirement is going to be 350 grams of matter. So twelve golf balls is 2, 4,…

 

Berry is standing with Dave Pierson, an engineer from the nonprofit manufacturing advocacy group, MAGNET. These two people have completely reinvented the toilet flapper. Their version looks like a hamburger-bun sized balloon stuck to an accordion-like hose.

 

Wally Berry: Twelve, that’s what the government requires. So, fourteen, sixteen…

 

Berry’s product uses air to seal the hole in the tank that water moves through when you flush. The expandable hose creates a vacuum so it uses less water per flush and can’t leak.  There’s really nothing else like it on the market.

 

Wally Berry: Ah, let’s do twenty-four and see what happens…

 

Inspiration came after a leaky flapper in Berry’s vacation home led to a shocking water bill. Berry got a loan from Cuyahoga County for new product development; that along with another $250,000 of his own savings and help from MAGNET engineer Pierson, led to the Siphon Flush. They debuted the product at a conference last fall. Pierson noticed it was a hit among municipal water districts who say leaky flappers can waste tremendous amounts of water.

 

Dave Pierson: Everybody that came up to it, looked at it and you could see, they’d look at it for about 5 seconds and then, you could see the light bulb go on: ‘Oh, I see how that works.’ Oh, boom, and then they are in the booth and they want to know how much it is, they want to know when they can get it, they want to know everything.

 

flushgraphic.gif

 

The Cleveland-based company has 17 thousand orders before production has even begun.  Shaun Rydell, water conservation coordinator for the city of Prescott, Arizona purchased several siphon flushes to test for her community. She says she’s seeing lots of new companies bringing products and services to help conserve water.

 

Shaun Rydell: I think that there are some really good opportunities to work with large commercial water customers as well as residential water customers including municipal governments to design incentive programs that put people to work in their own community.

 

There’s another really interesting twist to this story. Back in Northeast Ohio a manufacturing plant full of people waiting to work sit at tables. These are workers of SAW Inc. an employer of people from Cuyahoga County’s program for the mentally and physically challenged. I asked SAW’s Marilyn Jares how important it was to get work with Wally Berry’s Siphon Flush.

 

Marilyn Jares: Extremely important because we’ve had so many wonderful customers that worked with us for years either go to China or actually, physically move to Mexico. It’s had a real impact on our sales.  2008 was the first year we didn’t offer a bonus at the end of the year. We couldn’t.

 

Jares says as many as three dozen SAW workers will start assembling Siphon Flushes this week. She’s hoping to hire more workers if demand grows. One of the conditions for the Cuyahoga County loan is that Siphon Flush employ local residents. A local auto parts maker and a polymer manufacturer are also working on the water-conserving flapper.  They are all entering the green market world - a world Colette Chandler knows well.

 

Collette Chandler: It’s a $209 billion marketplace and it’s positioned to grow to $425 billion next year so there’s lots of opportunity to get market share.

 

Chandler’s firm is one of several companies working with MAGNET to help manufacturers find ways to become more environmentally conscious: from processing and packaging to product development. Chandler says companies have the potential to not only find new customers and markets, but to improve efficiency and save money. Siphon Flush founder Wally Berry is banking on the belief that there’s still plenty of business to be found in the green marketplace despite the economic recession.

 

Wally Berry: I think the timing is just perfect for this product. Everyone’s looking for ways to save money, looking for ways to conserve and this product does both.

 

Berry says most municipalities will test the device first, and then he hopes, the orders will come flowing in. 

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Mayor Frank Jackson talks with Italian business execs about a site in Cleveland

by Tom Breckenridge/Plain Dealer Reporter

Tuesday May 19, 2009, 9:14 AM

 

An Italian maker of refrigeration and air conditioning components is considering Cleveland for its first United States plant.

 

Mayor Frank Jackson will welcome top executives today from ONDA, a Vicenza, Italy-based company that the mayor toured while on a trade mission to the European country earlier this month.

 

More at http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2009/05/mayor_jackson_to_talk_business.html

 

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Say what you will about Frank but he certainly has made numerous attempts to involve Cleveland in the international markets.  London, Paris, Costa Rica, now this!

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Say what you will about Frank but he certainly has made numerous attempts to involve Cleveland in the international markets. London, Paris, Costa Rica, now this!

 

He has. I think it's a huge key to Cleveland's future.

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Say what you will about Frank but he certainly has made numerous attempts to involve Cleveland in the international markets.  London, Paris, Costa Rica, now this!

 

along with Puerto Rican, Dominican Republic, Panama, Jamaica and Belize.

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I think Frank Jackson have done a lot of things that aren't the glamorous, big projects that make people's eyes sparkle for a while .. but they're much more important than those types of projects in sustaining and expanding the life and future of a city.

 

Where those larger projects can be a flash in the pan type of thing in a lot of ways but not necessarily a true fix, I think he's generally had his eyes on things that are more foundational, and things that will help to move the region forward in a much larger, sustained way.

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Say what you will about Frank but he certainly has made numerous attempts to involve Cleveland in the international markets. London, Paris, Costa Rica, now this!

 

along with Puerto Rican, Dominican Republic, Panama, Jamaica and Belize.

 

And the new Cleveland office for SME Union in the Higbee Building directed by Dimitar Ivanov from Sofia, Bulgaria...(see previous page)

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I think this type of stuff will also help to attract more of an immigrant population, too, which is very good.

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interesting. among others, i saw that an italian tile organization highlighted cleveland architect richard fleishman+partners work at last week's "design '09" event in the meatpacking district of manhattan, so i took a few snaps. the renders are of the job corps center & headstart. i guess they used italian tile.

 

the event was pretty clever, all the shops in the meatpacking district held architecture/design exhibits so you could check those out & i guess shop at the same time & some exhibits were outdoors too -- it was cool to see some cleve in the middle of all that!

 

P1170838.jpg

 

P1170842.jpg

 

P1170841.jpg  P1170844.jpg

 

http://www.italiatiles.com/cti/home.nsf/Home_eng

http://www.meatpacking-district.com/flash3.html

http://www.meatpacking-district.com/downloads/Design09_scheduleonly2.pdf

 

 

 

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This could also be posted in the Cavs thread; however, due to the investment aspect for both the city and franchise:

 

http://www.cleveland.com/cavs/index.ssf/2009/05/proposed_chinese_investors_dee.html

 

Proposed Chinese investors' deep pockets excites LeBron James for Cavaliers potential

by Brian Windhorst/Plain Dealer Reporter

Sunday May 24, 2009, 10:35 PM

 

Prior to Sunday's Game 3 in Orlando, LeBron James said he was excited by the prospect of the Cavaliers adding Chinese investors.

 

ORLANDO, Fla. -- The Cavaliers' new business partner is a huge multinational corporation with billions in assets.

 

According to multiple NBA sources, the team's central new Chinese investor is New World Development Company, a Hong Kong-based conglomerate. It has over $21 billion in assets in hotels, convention properties, department stores, telecommunications, infrastructure projects and even financial services mostly in Southeast Asia.

 

More at http://www.cleveland.com/cavs/index.ssf/2009/05/proposed_chinese_investors_dee.html

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^^I'm surprised there hasn't been more of a response to this news.

 

Right away what comes to mind is:

 

1)  Chinese influence on the city itself (more Chinese reporters, business, tourists, residents?)

2)  Lebron, Cavs, Cleveland being promoted in China, especially in its major cities

3)  Lebron almost for sure staying in Cleveland now/ Possibility of signing an Asian player or two to help market the team.

4)  More $$$ investment on promotion, players, the city

 

EDIT:  maybe this should have it's own thread since this is more business than sports....

 

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