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Cincinnati's Pill Hill

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Cincinnati has a cluster of hospitals on top of the hill (Mt. Auburn) directly north of Downtown.  This cluster is made up of 6 hospitals and tons of medical offices and other related services; thus giving it the nickname of Pill Hill.  Plus there are some really cool buildings (old and new)...enjoy!

 

Good Samaritan Hospital

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The Deaconess Hospital (aka the Ugly one)

 

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10.  Looking back towards Good Sam in the distance

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Christ Hospital

 

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Medical Campus (University Hospital, Cincinnati Childrens Hospital, Shriners Hospital)

 

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18.  Some old...

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19.  ...with some new

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36.

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37.

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38.  Bye, bye

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Everytime I used to visit my grandmother in Christ I can remember complaining about the additions ruining the buildings.

 

Anyway, nice set; this area actually deserves its nickname. I get so sick of hearing I-75 through Daytonati called "Pill Alley," just because there is Atrium and the hospitals at 129/Tylersville.

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Christ Hospital has a nice view of the skyline.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Good idea for a thread and nice pics, but isn't there actually 7 hospitals?  University, Good Sam, Deaconess, Christ, Childrens, Shriners, and the Veterens Hospital?

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Isn't Corryville, Clifton & Avondale in there too?

 

When I said Mt. Auburn I was referring to the name of the hill, not the name of the neighborhood.

 

Good idea for a thread and nice pics, but isn't there actually 7 hospitals?  University, Good Sam, Deaconess, Christ, Childrens, Shriners, and the Veterens Hospital?

 

You're right...I completely blanked on the Veterans one, even though I have a photo of it.

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Who uses the old Bethesda hospital buildings next to I-71? It is unbelievable that the Health Alliance wanted to close Christ and move all their doctors to the new hospital in West Chester. Damn non for profits!

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Cincinnati Children's uses a lot of Bethesda's buildings.  Also, I noticed recently that the parking garage on Oak St. is completely surrounded by high fences, as is the walkway to the hospital complex.  Considering that hardly anyone even lives in that area, the excessive security is an insult to those who do live nearby. 

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When I said Mt. Auburn I was referring to the name of the hill, not the name of the neighborhood.

 

It is really the name of the neighborhood, and the facing of the hill which would not include Clifton and Corryville.

 

Mount Auburn was platted as a town in 1837. By 1842, it extended from Liberty Street (Liberty Street got its name because the city laws were not enforced north of it and it was the location of the "northern liberties" – gambling, drinking and carousing) to McMillan Street (note that the historic district only goes as far south as Ringold street, the rest of the Mount Auburn neighborhood to the south is the Prospect Hill Historic District).[2]

 

"Key’s Hill" was the original name for Mount Auburn.[2] It is one of Cincinnati's Seven Hills.

 

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Cincinnati Children's uses a lot of Bethesda's buildings.  Also, I noticed recently that the parking garage on Oak St. is completely surrounded by high fences, as is the walkway to the hospital complex.  Considering that hardly anyone even lives in that area, the excessive security is an insult to those who do live nearby. 

 

I used to work at the Oak Street campus.  Both the Winslow street building and the Oak Street building were purchased by Children's hospital, then leased back to TriHealth (of which Bethesda Oak was a part of).  The buildings are used by Trihealth for administrative functions, such as executive offices, IT, etc.  Childrens Hospital then leases back portions of the buildings for their own purposes from Trihealth (at least this was the case a year or so ago). 

 

As for the fences - while I was there a co-worker was car jacked in front of the Winslow street building.  I believe another co-worker was robbed as well.  They aren't pretty, that's for sure, but they were put in for a reason. 

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The old Jewish Hospital (prior to the move out to Kenwood) and Holmes hospital are also technically in pill hill.  But are not really used as hospitals now.

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It is really the name of the neighborhood, and the facing of the hill which would not include Clifton and Corryville.

 

Mount Auburn was platted as a town in 1837. By 1842, it extended from Liberty Street (Liberty Street got its name because the city laws were not enforced north of it and it was the location of the "northern liberties" – gambling, drinking and carousing) to McMillan Street (note that the historic district only goes as far south as Ringold street, the rest of the Mount Auburn neighborhood to the south is the Prospect Hill Historic District).[2]

 

"Key’s Hill" was the original name for Mount Auburn.[2] It is one of Cincinnati's Seven Hills.

 

Learn something new everyday.

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Don't forget the German Deaconess Home and Hospital on Liberty Hill

 

In 1888, the German Deaconness Home and Hospital opened at 533 Liberty Hill under the direction of Sisters Ann Kypke and Sophie Mundy, who had emigrated from Germany. They cared for patients who were primarily sick from typhoid, tuberculosis, and alcoholism. When the hospital on Straight Street opened in 1902, the building on Liberty Hill was used as a maternity hospital and infants boarding home for homeless or needy babies. (It was the beginnings of the Children's Home which is now in Oakley.) To help the neighborhood mothers keep and care for their children, they provided child care, thus becoming one of Cincinnatis first daycare centers.

 

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