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Columbus: Victorian Village Developments and News

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From the 10/29/06 Dispatch:

 

PHOTO: Artist Macolm Cochran, center, and John Marshall study the model for Tete-a-Tete Falls. 

 

SKETCH: The 19th-century chair that inspired Cochran’s design 

 

PHOTO:  A photograph with a superimposed sketch depicts Tete-a-Tete Falls in Goodale Park’s lake

 

GOODALE PARK

Waterfall sculpture will replace fountain

Sunday, October 29, 2006

Barbara Zuck

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Among urban green spaces, Goodale Park has a lot going for it: winding pathways; a historic, quiet setting; an inviting lake.  And soon the Short North park, 120 W. Goodale St., will have something more: a new water sculpture that weds history to contemporary life.  Malcolm Cochran’s Tete-a-Tete Falls, scheduled to be installed next year in the northeast corner of the park, offers a fresh take on the water feature and revisits the S-shaped chair from the 19 th century.

 

Read more athttp://www.dispatch.com/features-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/10/29/20061029-G1-02.html

 

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Mystery straw appears in Goodale Park pond

Monday, June 30, 2008

By Encarnacion Pyle

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

If you thought you saw a large straw in the middle of the Goodale Park pond in the past few days, don't be alarmed.  You aren't suffering from heat-induced hallucinations.  And your head isn't clouded from marijuana fumes from someone enjoying ComFest a little too much.  There really is a large straw sticking about 3 1/2 feet out of the pond. It's not just any straw.  It's a red-and-white bendy straw.  The kind that kids drool over and can't resist using to blow bubbles in their drinks. But who put it there?

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/06/30/straw.ART_ART_06-30-08_B3_MEAKD9O.html?sid=101

 

STRAW_AHA_01.JPG_06-30-08_B3_LVAJOV4.jpg

This huge straw appeared recently in the Goodale Park pond.  Local artist Vinchen, who works in secret, often at night, was behind its mysterious appearance ahead of ComFest in the park.

 

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VICTORIAN VILLAGE

Successful rebirth: Rescued from rougher days, neighborhood thrives as it did a century ago

Sunday, September 7, 2008 - 3:35 AM

By Sherri Williams, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Queen Anne manses tower over quaint cottages and rentals on the streets of Victorian Village.  The diverse housing stock dates to the late 19th century, when the mix of large homes, row houses, doubles and cottages resulted from "a mix of people with money, and people who worked for people with money," said Rob Pettit, a Victorian Village Society board member.  Construction boomed in the early 1900s when Columbus laid a streetcar line to the neighborhood, enticing the wealthy and the laborers to move northwest from Downtown to the former farmlands of the Neil and Hubbard families.

 

Today, Victorian Village is still home to a diverse group: families and singles, owners and renters, and gays and straights, many of whom describe the community as cosmopolitan, progressive and tolerant.  Goodale Park, on the south end of the village, is the site of the annual ComFest, a hippie-spirit-filled community festival.  Columbus' annual gay-pride parade, one of the largest in the Midwest, generally kicks off in the park on the same weekend, attracting both fabulously costumed singles and families with children in tow.

 

Read much more at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/09/07/Victorian_Village-WWL.ART_ART_09-07-08_B1_GQB88NP.html?sid=101

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^Some additional information from the Dispatch's Victorian Village story...

 

 

2839654287_b684fb4ee1_o.jpg

 

 

Victorian Village at a glance

 

  • Population: 4,116

 

  • Estimated households: 2,559

 

  • Owner-occupied: 21.8 percent

 

  • Average appraised value: $256,657*

 

  • High-school graduates: 88.6 percent

 

  • Bachelor's degrees: 61.2 percent

 

  • Median family income: $75,133

 

* 2007; all other data 2000

Source: DataSource/Community Research Partners

 

 

Slideshow Video of Victorian Village at http://wwwphp.dispatch.com/vplayer.php?clip=http://streamfarm.dispatchbroadcast.com/Dispatch/vic_village.wmv

 

 

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From Columbus Underground:

 

Goodale Park Entrance to Receive a Facelift

By jpizzow | March 31, 2010 8:15am

 

Victorian Village’s front yard is about to get a makeover.  City Council approved $182,000 in funds on Monday night for a facelift for the entrance to Goodale Park at the corner of Goodale Street and Park Street.

 

goodale2.jpg

goodale3.jpg

 

LARGER VIEW OF THE PARK ENTRANCE PLAN

 

MORE AT: http://www.columbusunderground.com/goodale-park-entrance-to-receive-a-facelift

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Couple of updates on a long-planned fountain installation project for Goodale Park.  The first is an article from last Sunday's Columbus Dispatch.  The second is from Columbus Underground.  Walker Evans interviewed the artist who designed the fountain, local sculptor Malcolm Cochran.

 

Goodale fountain back on track in wake of revision

 

Goodale Park Fountain to be Installed This Winter

 

goodale-fountain-1.jpg

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No; it would be an odd time to operate a fountain but it's easier and less intrusive to work on ponds, fountains, damns, etc. in the winter.  Fewer people around, you can drain the pond and no one will cry about it, if you're not bringing heavy equipment into the equation the muck at the bottom of the pond is easier to deal with frozen/semi-solid, less precipitation, and so on.

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No; it would be an odd time to operate a fountain...

 

Actually, the original rock fountain was run all winter long and this one is being planned for the same. From the <a href="http://www.columbusunderground.com/goodale-park-fountain-to-be-installed-this-winter">CU interview</a>:

 

<img src="http://www.columbusunderground.com/archives/goodale-fountain-3.jpg">

 

<i>Malcolm Cochran:  Since the very early days of the park there had been some kind of vertical rock structure. This no longer exists as it was removed a long time ago, but I do remember another one that was removed in 1995, which was sort of a conical beehive-shape of rocks with a pump and a spout coming out of the top. During the summer it wasn’t all that interesting, but during the winter it made these phenomenal ice forms because it continued to run all winter. It was taken down in 1995 basically because the rockwork fell apart. Part of getting this new fountain project going was to replace that older rockwork piece.</i>

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Thats really cool. With the way the pond is positioned, a lot of people will see it at the edge of the park. So people ice skate there? I see them walking on the ice.

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Couple of updates on a long-planned fountain installation project for Goodale Park.  The first is an article from last Sunday's Columbus Dispatch.  The second is from Columbus Underground.  Walker Evans interviewed the artist who designed the fountain, local sculptor Malcolm Cochran.

 

Goodale fountain back on track in wake of revision

 

Goodale Park Fountain to be Installed This Winter

 

goodale-fountain-1.jpg

 

Winter's over, spring is here.  People are spending more time at the park and what are they greeted with?  An empty pit drained last fall for installation of a water fountain that still hasn't been constructed.  What the hell are they waiting for?  They had all winter to get this done and now when people are out & about enjoying the park, there's neither a fountain nor any water.

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Unfortunately, one project that isn't moving along too well is the Goodale Park fountain project.  First, here's the original post from August 2010 with a rendering of the completed fountain project:

 

Couple of updates on a long-planned fountain installation project for Goodale Park.  The first is an article from last Sunday's Columbus Dispatch.  The second is from Columbus Underground.  Walker Evans interviewed the artist who designed the fountain, local sculptor Malcolm Cochran.

 

Goodale fountain back on track in wake of revision

 

Goodale Park Fountain to be Installed This Winter

 

goodale-fountain-1.jpg

Here's a photo of what the fountain (and the pond at Goodale Park) look like in August 2011:

 

dry-pond-art-gatdq5j9-1dry-pond-blv-01-jpg.jpg?__scale=w:620,h:401,t:2

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Because of the slow progress on the Goodale Park fountain project - chronicled in this Columbus Underground thread - Columbus Recreation and Parks Department was considering refilling the Goodale Park pond earlier this month before the fountain was finished this year.  The Friends of Goodale Park, who are funding and contracting the fountain project, was supposed to be done in June.  Columbus Recreation and Parks had scheduled weddings in the park's gazebo overlooking the pond for this month, thinking that construction would be finished.  Now, the wedding parties are threatening to cancel if the pond remains a construction site. 

 

More about this in the Dispatch article:  Goodale Park fountain project may be on hold - City may refill pond before construction work is complete.

 

Instead, a compromise was reached between Columbus Recreation and Parks, The Friends of Goodale Park and the scheduled wedding parties.  Below is the article from the Dispatch:

 

Goodale Park pond to stay dry until fountain finished

Construction site to be shielded for weddings

By Doug Caruso, The Columbus Dispatch

Friday, August 19, 2011 - 8:04 AM

 

Columbus won’t refill the Goodale Park pond until work on a sculpture fountain in its center is completed.  The fountain, paid for by donations gathered by the Friends of Goodale Park, is more than six weeks behind schedule.  Columbus Recreation and Parks Director Alan McKnight was considering refilling the pond because six bridal parties had reserved the park’s gazebo for weddings, expecting that the project would be finished by now.

 

Instead, the city will refund $2,400 in rental fees to the bridal parties.  The weddings will go ahead, and the Friends of Goodale Park will pay a wedding planner to design drapes and ferns to block the view of the construction site from the gazebo, said Terri Leist, an assistant recreation and parks director.  It turned out that filling the pond, draining it this fall so that work could continue, and then refilling it would have cost much more than refunding the rental fees.

(. . .)

The Friends of Goodale Park group now expects to finish the fountain, which is topped by bronze elephant sculptures, in mid-September.  The group plans a dedication ceremony for Oct. 9.

 

READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2011/08/19/park-pond-to-stay-dry-till-fountain-finished.html

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Goodale Park Fountain update from the Friends of GoodalePark Facebook page:

 

Fountain Update: Electrical and plumbing work is complete.  City inspectors reviewed/approved installation today.  One final inspection will be needed to demonstrate functioning pumps.  As water is returned to the pond, we'll be tuning system timers and performance.  We have however decided to delay formal dedication of the fountain until a later date that will be announced via our website.  Please disregard any previously published dates for the dedication event. - Jason Kentner, President FGP

 

And the pond is being refilled today.  News and photo at CU: Goodale Park Fountain - News & Updates.

From today's Dispatch: Water level dropping in Goodale Park’s pond - Mystery problem delays dedication of new fountain

 

I'll bet this seemed like such a simple project.  "Hey, let's build a new fountain in the Goodale Park pond.  How difficult could that be?"  Actually, this may or may not turn out to be a big problem.  According to the article, the Goodale Park pond has a clay bottom.  Since the clay has dried up after being exposed for the past year, it might be just the clay absorbing more water than usual.  However, if there's a leak...:roll:

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I posted this over on columbusunderground, but haven't seen it over here yet. A total 69 apartment units would make this a rather significant building, one unit less than "The Hubbard" / new Ibizia. No renderings have been posted yet.

 

Looks like the long vacant surface lot at 3rd and Dennison is going to see development. From the upcoming Victorian Village commission meeting -

 

No Address (Third & Dennison Avenues)

Sullivan Bruck Architects (Applicant) Plaza Properties (Owner)

This project has previously received a conceptual review.

Conceptual Review

• New construction of flats and townhouses per submitted drawings.

• Design includes 59-unit apartment building (Building A) and 10-unit townhouse building (Building B).

 

The following is taken from the Unapproved November 10, 2011 Victorian Village Commission Meeting Minutes:

 

Commissioner Comments

 

• Commissioner Berthold – Asked if there is any way to break the apartment building up with the use of more indentations (ie. façade/break/façade/break). Asked if there will be a wall between each townhouse unit on the rooftop level. Indicated that modernity could work at this site. The materials selection appears to be headed in the right direction. The apartment building should not be brick; the stone material and modern design are worth exploring.

 

•Commissioner Conte – The use of one large building for the apartment use is an issue. The previously approved development for the site was broken up into two buildings. Isn’t sure about the materials that have been indicated, but has not ruled them out. The City Code Standards for New Construction addresses materials of surrounding buildings, and states “New structures should look new, reflecting contemporary design standards…”. The current design seems “too heavy”; design techniques should be used to minimize its visual size.

 

•Commissioner Decker – There does not appear to be issues with the scale and massing or the overall design for this site. The “walk-outs” on the apartment building could be scaled back. The “stone-like” material could be a more traditional material while maintaining its modern design. It is evident that a great deal of design work and thought has gone into breaking up the mass of the building with its design (materials and shadow). The current style could be “ratcheted-back a little”.

 

•Commissioner Wood – Is in agreement with the other Commissioners’ comments.

 

From here - http://development.columbus.gov/uploadedFiles/Development/Planning_Division/Boards_and_Commissions/Historic_Preservation/Victorian_Village_Commission/Meetings/2011/2011%20VVC%20DEC.agd.pdf

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I posted this over on columbusunderground, but haven't seen it over here yet. A total 69 apartment units would make this a rather significant building, one unit less than "The Hubbard" / new Ibizia. No renderings have been posted yet.

 

Looks like the long vacant surface lot at 3rd and Dennison is going to see development. From the upcoming Victorian Village commission meeting -

 

No Address (Third & Dennison Avenues)

Sullivan Bruck Architects (Applicant) Plaza Properties (Owner)

This project has previously received a conceptual review.

Conceptual Review

• New construction of flats and townhouses per submitted drawings.

• Design includes 59-unit apartment building (Building A) and 10-unit townhouse building (Building B).

 

From here - http://development.columbus.gov/uploadedFiles/Development/Planning_Division/Boards_and_Commissions/Historic_Preservation/Victorian_Village_Commission/Meetings/2011/2011%20VVC%20DEC.agd.pdf

Thanks for posting the notice about Third & Dennison futureman.  We didn't catch this one! 

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I posted this over on columbusunderground, but haven't seen it over here yet. A total 69 apartment units would make this a rather significant building, one unit less than "The Hubbard" / new Ibizia. No renderings have been posted yet.

 

Looks like the long vacant surface lot at 3rd and Dennison is going to see development. From the upcoming Victorian Village commission meeting -

 

No Address (Third & Dennison Avenues)

Sullivan Bruck Architects (Applicant) Plaza Properties (Owner)

This project has previously received a conceptual review.

Conceptual Review

• New construction of flats and townhouses per submitted drawings.

• Design includes 59-unit apartment building (Building A) and 10-unit townhouse building (Building B).

 

From here - http://development.columbus.gov/uploadedFiles/Development/Planning_Division/Boards_and_Commissions/Historic_Preservation/Victorian_Village_Commission/Meetings/2011/2011%20VVC%20DEC.agd.pdf

Thanks for posting the notice about Third & Dennison futureman.  We didn't catch this one!

 

No problem, Business First just had an article today about it, includes a rendering as well. Looks like the main building will be four stories tall, ground floor parking w/3 floors of apartments above.

 

Apartments proposed for Victorian Village site instead of condos

Premium content from Business First by Brian R. Ball, Staff reporter

Date: Friday, December 16, 2011, 6:00am EST - Last Modified: Friday, December 16, 2011, 12:35pm EST

Brian R. Ball Staff reporter - Business First

 

dennisonand3rd.jpg

 

A site in Victorian Village targeted for a condominium project before the housing market collapsed may be developed as apartments.

 

Real estate investors Jason Snyder and Brian Barker want to build a 59-unit apartment complex and five townhouse-style duplexes along Dennison Avenue where developer Plaza Properties Inc.    had hoped to build condos in 2007.

 

(...)

 

The Snyder Barker Investments partnership showed its housing plan to the Victorian Village Commission with expectations it would bring revised plans back for final approval in early 2012. The Sullivan Bruck Architects Inc.    -designed project would include three levels of apartment flats above a 76-slot parking area. The 10 townhouses, which may be rented or put up for sale, would be accompanied by garages for 20 vehicles.

 

READ MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/print-edition/2011/12/16/more-apartments-targeted-for-site.html

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Leafy Dale Adds New Apartments to Victorian Village

By: Walker, Columbus Underground

Published on January 12, 2012 - 1:00 pm

 

The Wood Companies are already busy with construction on High Street with their apartment building development over top of Northstar Cafe, but that’s not stopping them from already moving on to their next big project: The Leafy Dale.

 

Constructed in 1895 as a hotel, the Leafy Dale building stands tall at 789 Dennison Avenue, a half-block northwest of Goodale Park.  “The building has been vacant for about five years,” says Mark Wood, President of The Wood Companies.  “A couple of other developers tried to redevelop it into condos a few years ago and ran out of money before they were able to finish it.”

 

The Wood Companies stepped in recently to buy the Leafy Dale, and is currently working on construction documents to move forward with building out 26 apartment units for rent.

 

MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/leafy-dale-adds-new-apartments-to-victorian-village

 

6709650881_6ecd244cdd_d.jpg  6709651413_6e9dff1403_d.jpg

 

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I didn't even know they were unoccupied until quite recently.  :-[

 

Ya I had been in those Leafy Dales numerous times from 2004-2006. My best friend lived there at the time and myself, I lived across the street.  It was a great location!  The landlord kicked everyone out around 2006 to renovate them into condos (as mentioned above)  The project was onto a rocky start from the beginning.  The only work that went on for months was tearing down trees and bushes.

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Leafy Dale Adds New Apartments to Victorian Village

By: Walker, Columbus Underground

Published on January 12, 2012 - 1:00 pm

 

The Wood Companies are already busy with construction on High Street with their apartment building development over top of Northstar Cafe, but that’s not stopping them from already moving on to their next big project: The Leafy Dale.

 

Constructed in 1895 as a hotel, the Leafy Dale building stands tall at 789 Dennison Avenue, a half-block northwest of Goodale Park.  “The building has been vacant for about five years,” says Mark Wood, President of The Wood Companies.  “A couple of other developers tried to redevelop it into condos a few years ago and ran out of money before they were able to finish it.”

 

The Wood Companies stepped in recently to buy the Leafy Dale, and is currently working on construction documents to move forward with building out 26 apartment units for rent.

 

MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/leafy-dale-adds-new-apartments-to-victorian-village

 

6709650881_6ecd244cdd_d.jpg  6709651413_6e9dff1403_d.jpg

^^Good to hear. I wish the building directly south could go away.

Looks like this is going to happen.  Thanks to a heads-up from Columbus Underground.  The March 8, 2012 Victorian Village Commission agenda contained the following project notice:

 

Application #12-3-13

779 Dennison Avenue

Wood Companies (Applicant)    Historic Dennison Hotel, LLC (Owner)

 

Conceptual Review

- Demolish existing 10-unit two-story apartment building constructed in 1970.

- Construct new extension to the existing Leafy Dale building (789 Dennison Ave.)

- Proposed connected building to be 4-story with additional two penthouse units set back from the front elevation on the 5th floor.

- Building to contain two levels of parking accommodating 33 parking spaces and a total of 14 units.

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From the March 8, 2012 Victorian Village Commission agenda:

 

Application #12-3-13

779 Dennison Avenue

Wood Companies (Applicant)    Historic Dennison Hotel, LLC (Owner)

 

Conceptual Review

- Demolish existing 10-unit two-story apartment building constructed in 1970.

- Construct new extension to the existing Leafy Dale building (789 Dennison Ave.)

- Proposed connected building to be 4-story with additional two penthouse units set back from the front elevation on the 5th floor.

- Building to contain two levels of parking accommodating 33 parking spaces and a total of 14 units.

Removing that 1970 apartment building immediately south the Leafy Dale Building and adding to the Leafy Dale Building takes an already good project and moves it into the great category. 

 

Here is some more information on the above extention to the Leafy Dale Building on Dennison Avenue.  Below is the site map of the Leafy Dale project area.  Within the blue box is the Leafy Dale Building at 789 Dennison Avenue, which would be renovated into 26 apartment units.  Hi-lighted within the box is the 1970 apartment building to be demolished.  Immediately south - and outside the Leafy Dale project area - is an existing house at the corner of Dennison and Buttles (773 Dennison Avenue).

 

6960742455_510a3b72a7_z_d.jpg

 

 

Below is a photo of the Leafy Dale Building at 789 Dennison Avenue which would be renovated into 26 apartment units.

 

6709650881_6ecd244cdd_d.jpg

 

 

Immediately south is an existing apartment building built in 1970 that would be demolished.  The building would be replaced with a new four-story addition to the Leafy Dale Building that would contain 14 additional apartment units and 33 interior parking spaces.

6814628398_a939b709b0_d.jpg

 

 

And for a little more context, here is the house immediately south of the above photo.  It's at the corner of Dennison and Buttles Avenues (773 Dennison Avenue) and would be next to the Leafy Dale addition.

6960742613_9389040be0_d.jpg

 

According to Columbus Underground, the project developers will shortly be releasing some renderings of the expanded Leafy Dale project.  Can't wait to see 'em.

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Theres a few 1970's style apartments in german village that look very similar that I've always hoped someone would teardown and replace as well. Maybe there's hope!

 

Could it there be public incentives to preserving "good" architecture and knocking down "bad" architecture?

 

I think we've seen that landmark-type designations are too limited, and can only accomplish so much.

 

And re: "good" vs "bad," could there ever be agreement on which is which?

 

 

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I wonder what happened to the houses that existed where the 1970 building is now.  If you look at old photos, there were houses just as nice as 773. 

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Knowing that the Short North wasn't the neighborhood it is now, there's a good chance that the house(s) that were where 779 is now may have been split up into poorly maintained apartments.

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Goodale Park regaining statue thanks to Pizzuti project

Business First by Brian R. Ball, Staff reporter

Date: Wednesday, March 21, 2012, 2:53pm EDT

 

The commercial complex Pizzuti Cos. has planned for the Short North may not result in the full historic restoration of the former Order of the United Commercial Travelers headquarters at 632 N. Park Street.  But a historic piece of the property has been returned to a spot in nearby Goodale Park.

 

The developer today moved the Charles Benton Flagg Memorial back to its original concrete pad close to the park’s main entrance off Park Street.  It’s a 15-foot tall granite monument dedicated in 1907.

 

MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2012/03/goodale-park-regaining-statue-thanks.html

 


MORE ABOUT THE MONUMENT BEING MOVED FROM PIZZUTI'S UCT PROPERTY TO GOODALE PARK.  PRESS RELEASE AND PHOTOS AT COLUMBUS UNDERGROUND:

 

Monument-move-1.jpg

 

Monument-move-3.jpg

 

Monument-move-2.jpg

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Here is some more information on the extention to the Leafy Dale Building on Dennison Avenue.  Below is the site map of the Leafy Dale project area.  Within the blue box is the Leafy Dale Building at 789 Dennison Avenue, which would be renovated into 26 apartment units.  Hi-lighted within the box is the 1970 apartment building to be demolished.  Immediately south - and outside the Leafy Dale project area - is an existing house at the corner of Dennison and Buttles (773 Dennison Avenue).

 

6960742455_510a3b72a7_z_d.jpg

 

Below is a photo of the Leafy Dale Building at 789 Dennison Avenue which would be renovated into 26 apartment units.

 

6709650881_6ecd244cdd_d.jpg

 

Immediately south is an existing apartment building built in 1970 that would be demolished.  The building would be replaced with a new four-story addition to the Leafy Dale Building that would contain 14 additional apartment units and 33 interior parking spaces.

6814628398_a939b709b0_d.jpg

 

And for a little more context, here is the house immediately south of the above photo.  It's at the corner of Dennison and Buttles Avenues (773 Dennison Avenue) and would be next to the Leafy Dale addition.

6960742613_9389040be0_d.jpg

 

According to Columbus Underground, the project developers will shortly be releasing some renderings of the expanded Leafy Dale project.  Can't wait to see 'em.

The renderings of the Leafy Dale addition at 779-789 Dennison Avenue have been released at the Columbus Underground thread - Leafy Dale in Victorian Village.  Below is a Dennison Avenue elevation showing the new addition next to the Leafy Dale Building; a section cut thru the new addition; and a site plan of the front yards along Dennison Avenue.  The big surprise in the addition is a proposed vehicular curb cut on Dennison Avenue and a proposed vehicular drive to an internal parking garage in the addition.

 

The Dennison Avenue elevation shows the existing 773 Dennison Avenue house to the left of the addition, the new addition and the existing Leafy Dale building to the right.

leafy-dale-01.jpg

 

This is the section thru the new addition.  A lower level parking garage is accessed from a back alley.  A ground floor parking garage is accessed from Dennison Avenue.  Above the parking levels are fourth floors of residential apartments.

leafy-dale-02.jpg

 

This is the site plan of the Dennison Avenue front yards.  It shows the existing 773 Dennison Avenue house, the new addition with the proposed curb cut and vehicular drive and the existing Leafy Dale building.

leafy-dale-03.jpg

 

The architecture of the addition looks great and should be well received.  However, the Dennison Avenue curb cut and vehicular drive is another matter.  It looks like they've tried to de-emphasize the driveway with a grass median, but the curb cut itself is a tough sell.  I can see why they are proposing a Dennison Avenue access point to go along with a back alley access point.  Doing so eliminates the need for internal ramps between the two parking levels, which eat up precious space within a small project area.  But the trade-off of adding vehicle traffic in the front yard might be too much to ask for the Victorian Village Commission.

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^I like the addition, generally. I am concerned about the penthouses, particularily on the historic Leafy Dale building. An interesting project, however, and I hope it moves forward in some form.

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Over the past two years, the Short North neighborhood of Victorian Village has seen "The Saga of the Goodale Park Pond".  It started out quite innocently and with the best of intentions back in 2010, when the civic group - Friends of Goodale Park - raised funds to replace the small fountain in the pond with a larger fountain.  The pond was drained after ComFest in early summer 2010 with intention to remove the existing fountain and have the new fountain in place by Winter 2010/2011.  Then the pond could be refilled in time for Spring 2011 and next year's ComFest.

 

However, construction moved much slower then anticipated and the new fountain was not ready for Spring 2011.  Or Summer 2011.  The new fountain was finished by Fall 2011.  And all that was necessary to complete the project was to refill the water back into the Goodale Park Pond.  So they did.  Only to see the water level slowly drop ... and drop ... and drop.  Within the next month the water in the pond drained away.  And that's when they realized they had another problem - a leak. 

 

After some analysis over the Winter of 2011/2012, the Friends of Goodale Park and the City of Columbus decided that the construction of the new fountain must have done something to the bentonite clay that lines the pond bottom.  So the City resurfaced the pond with additional bentonite clay to plug the leak.  So with the new clay liner installed, the City refilled the pond again early this month.  And for a while, all was right.  The new fountain got turned for the first time and was looking pretty good.  Below is photo of the new fountain in use from the Friends of Goodale Park facebook page.

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But after a few days with the fountain operating, they noticed that the water level was dropping about 1/2 inch per day.  Not as fast as the water level dropped before the new liner was installed - but still not ideal.  So for now the fountain has been turned off while they reassess their options.  And the "The Saga of the Goodale Park Pond" continues.  Below are some articles from the Columbus Dispatch from earlier this month that chronicle the current situation:

 

Dispatch: City fills Goodale Park pond, hopes past leaks are fixed

 

Dispatch: Goodale Park pond losing water

 

Dispatch: Slow leak, big pain - Since a fountain was installed in Goodale Park last year, the pond it was put in hasn’t held water. Efforts to find and fix the leak are costing money and, increasingly, patience.

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Well, they've performed some dye tests.  But they still can't figure out the leak at the Goodale Park pond.  I'm beginning to agree with an option proposed by Columbus Underground's Goodale Park Fountain thread.  Just install a water level sensor to automatically refill the pond from a groundwater well ... and call it fixed.

 

Dispatch: Test can't pinpoint leak at Goodale Park pond

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