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Cleveland: Midtown: Development and News

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^that is precisely why I want to see what their expansion plans are... maybe it's more of euclid, maybe it's south towards carnegie (they own land and buildings there as well).  Hard to comment on the unknown.

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To be serious, the entire Pierre's plant is set back from the street with a black fence in front of it.  There is greenspace directly to the west of the complex, where the warehouse will go.  I would assume that the planning commission won't allow the warehouse to look like just "anything".  Pierre's is what it is- I would rather have them expand here- even on Euclid- than to loose them to another municipality/region/state later. As long as SOME type of above par design is part of the proposal, I'll be ok with it.

 

I honestly don't know how to feel about this section of Euclid.  Part of me wants to scream out that we're squandering the greatest opportunity for our main thoroughfare with these proposed developments.  Another part of me wants to just wait and see what happens in regards to whatever plan is in place for Midtown.  But I surely feel that the LACK of a concise, well thought-out plan for this street could possibly lead to us missing a great opportunity for one of the nation's greatest avenues.  If there is a plan for the street, as of right now, I'm not a fan of the planner.

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First, in no way am I advocating for an industrial parkway on Euclid.  But I am a practical guy and sometimes I wonder what people's realistic expectations for MidTown are/were when the BRT was built.  I understand there was a "vision" (we have seen plenty of those) and we all have our dreams, but was anybody realistically expecting a sliver of urban density from UC to Downtown to sprout up along the corridor, with residential, retail and "UO approved" commercial uses lining Euclid Avenue from CSU to the Clinic?

 

I always contemplated the BRT to encourage build out from UC and Downtown, meaning the density of those neighborhoods would expand another 10-15 blocks or so over the course of a couple decades.  I also expected, and we are seeing, some significant infill in UC and the CBD as a direct result of the BRT.  I also hope for build out to the north and south along Chester, Payne, Carnegie and Prospect within the same block confines.  However, I never realistically expected a magical boom of contruction covering 50 or more blocks that would connect the two areas with true urban neighborhoods.

 

My bottom line is that if a developer wants to build anything that is going to get hip hip hoorays on this board, I would rather it be in UC or the CBD than MidTown.  Both of those areas still have a lot of growth potential to them and, at least IMO, building lively neighborhoods in MidTown only causes sprawl within the City itself.  For every resident MidTown attracts, it probably takes one away from UC or Downtown.  Expansion of desired levels of density into MidTown should be caused by demand and necessity down the road, not pushed as a goal when we still have a lot of work to do on the bookends of the BRT. 

 

It's the same philosophy I have with Skyscrapers - build up only when there is not enough room to fill in.

 

Sorry for the rant.... JMHO

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A family builds a really nice mansion.  It looks great - they're all excited about it, and it's the pride of the whole neighborhood.  Then, as soon as it's ready, the husband decides to turn the living room into a machine shop.  The wife starts a baby sitting operation in the family room.  The high school boy starts building computers in the kitchen, and the grade school girl turns the foyer into an animal shelter.  Pretty soon the nice mansion turns into a run-down, sore spot of the neighborhood.

 

That's pretty much what's happening with the Midtown section of Euclid Ave.  Because it *looks good*, all kinds of organizations that should have no business on a street designed to be pedestrian-friendly and foster urban development, are opening shop there: a madhouse/homeless shelter, a soon-to-be ghetto, a food factory.  Why they wouldn't be required to move to, say, Carnegie or Chester, beats me.

 

On the other hand, maybe that's the only way to fill the empty land between the two cities that together are called Cleveland, and it may just work...

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A family builds a really nice mansion.  It looks great - they're all excited about it, and it's the pride of the whole neighborhood.  Then, as soon as it's ready, the husband decides to turn the living room into a machine shop.  The wife starts a baby sitting operation in the family room.  The high school boy starts building computers in the kitchen, and the grade school girl turns the foyer into an animal shelter.  Pretty soon the nice mansion turns into a run-down, sore spot of the neighborhood.

 

That's pretty much what's happening with the Midtown section of Euclid Ave.  Because it *looks good*, all kinds of organizations that should have no business on a street designed to be pedestrian-friendly and foster urban development, are opening shop there: a madhouse/homeless shelter, a soon-to-be ghetto, a food factory.  Why they wouldn't be required to move to, say, Carnegie or Chester, beats me.

 

On the other hand, maybe that's the only way to fill the empty land between the two cities that together are called Cleveland, and it may just work...

 

Please explain the choice of words??

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a madhouse/homeless shelter, a soon-to-be ghetto, a food factory. Why they wouldn't be required to move to, say, Carnegie or Chester, beats me.

 

So your vision is to have a densely populated, pedestrian friendly Euclid Avenue with the madhouse/homeless shelter, a soon-to-be-ghetto, and a food factory (your words) just one block away?

 

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Pierre's Ice Cream Co. gets unanimous approval for $6 million expansion from Cleveland Planning Commission

 

by Janet H. Cho/Plain Dealer Reporter

Friday September 04, 2009, 11:22 AM

 

CLEVELAND - Pierre's Ice Cream Co. got a unanimous thumbs-up from the City Planning Commission this morning on its $6 million proposal to build another 35,540-square-foot production and storage facility on its Midtown Cleveland campus.

 

 

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2009/09/pierres_ice_cream_co_gets_unan.html

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A family builds a really nice mansion.  It looks great - they're all excited about it, and it's the pride of the whole neighborhood.  Then, as soon as it's ready, the husband decides to turn the living room into a machine shop.  The wife starts a baby sitting operation in the family room.  The high school boy starts building computers in the kitchen, and the grade school girl turns the foyer into an animal shelter.  Pretty soon the nice mansion turns into a run-down, sore spot of the neighborhood.

 

That's pretty much what's happening with the Midtown section of Euclid Ave.  Because it *looks good*, all kinds of organizations that should have no business on a street designed to be pedestrian-friendly and foster urban development, are opening shop there: a madhouse/homeless shelter, a soon-to-be ghetto, a food factory.  Why they wouldn't be required to move to, say, Carnegie or Chester, beats me.

 

On the other hand, maybe that's the only way to fill the empty land between the two cities that together are called Cleveland, and it may just work...

 

Please explain the choice of words??

 

I think the choice of words are pretty funny! Pretty much self explanatory. Ha! The inconvenient truth, maybe?

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A family builds a really nice mansion.  It looks great - they're all excited about it, and it's the pride of the whole neighborhood.  Then, as soon as it's ready, the husband decides to turn the living room into a machine shop.  The wife starts a baby sitting operation in the family room.  The high school boy starts building computers in the kitchen, and the grade school girl turns the foyer into an animal shelter.  Pretty soon the nice mansion turns into a run-down, sore spot of the neighborhood.

 

That's pretty much what's happening with the Midtown section of Euclid Ave.  Because it *looks good*, all kinds of organizations that should have no business on a street designed to be pedestrian-friendly and foster urban development, are opening shop there: a madhouse/homeless shelter, a soon-to-be ghetto, a food factory.  Why they wouldn't be required to move to, say, Carnegie or Chester, beats me.

 

On the other hand, maybe that's the only way to fill the empty land between the two cities that together are called Cleveland, and it may just work...

 

Please explain the choice of words??

 

I think the choice of words are pretty funny! Pretty much self explanatory. Ha! The inconvenient truth, maybe?

 

yo, tell that to chuck heston !! :laugh:

 

 

 

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FYI: this was on design-review's agenda on Friday....

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2009/100209/index.php

 

Ordinance No. 1387-09 (Ward 5/Cleveland):  Authorizing the Commissioner of Purchases and Supplies to purchase property for future redevelopment of the State Behavioral Health Center in Midtown for the Department of Economic Development.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Cleveland City Council takes first steps to prep Midtown land for state mental hospital

By Henry J. Gomez, The Plain Dealer

October 05, 2009, 1:27AM

 

Efforts to prepare land in Cleveland's Midtown area for a state mental hospital are underway.

 

The City Council's Finance Committee will hear legislation this afternoon to acquire and clean parcels near Euclid Avenue and East 59th Street.

 

 

MORE AT CLEVELAND.COM

http://www.cleveland.com/cityhall/index.ssf/2009/10/cleveland_city_council_takes_f.html

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Cleveland City Council takes first steps to prep Midtown land for state mental hospital

By Henry J. Gomez, The Plain Dealer

October 05, 2009, 1:27AM

 

Efforts to prepare land in Cleveland's Midtown area for a state mental hospital are underway.

 

The City Council's Finance Committee will hear legislation this afternoon to acquire and clean parcels near Euclid Avenue and East 59th Street.

 

 

MORE AT CLEVELAND.COM

http://www.cleveland.com/cityhall/index.ssf/2009/10/cleveland_city_council_takes_f.html

 

Great.

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The outline of the parcel in the PD story was interesting.  Not sure how they will use the land on the south side of Euclid.  Certainly surface parking comes to mind, which would depress me.  Hopefully they will site this thing efficiently and unload any surplus land instead of sprawling the thing out to cover the whole lot.

 

I know this project annoys a lot of folks, but I'm still OK with it if the design is even halfway competent (maybe the best we can hope for); it's a major employer and will bring a lot more activity to the immediate area than the subsidized housing will.

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Go to historicaerials.com to see exactly what was there. I love/hate that site.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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You guys are correct.  Per article in PD today the city bought the lot on the south side of the street for parking.  We can only hope that it won't be surface parking, but rather an interesting garage with street level retail, but I think I am being a dreamer here.  Never had a real problem with the hospital (not yet at least...have to see the design), but this really irks me.

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I'm surprised. I though the zoning overlay for that section of Euclid Avenue (as of 2005 or 2006) didn't allow for surface parking fronting Euclid. I don't remember the gory details of the zoning language, so if anyone has those details, please share!!


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Whatever happens here will have to go through design review and they're nowhere near that yet.  If they want to put in surface parking, I'm assuming they'll need a zoning variance, which requires support from the City, CDC, etc.

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^A zoning variance is somewhat easy to get, as long as the councilman of the ward is on board with the changes.  If the councilman wants it (reelection purposes), the CDC will more than likely follow suit.  Noticing that this will bring construction to this section of Euclid which has been ignored for so long, I would assume that the councilman won't care about the surface parking lot (UNLESS, of course, the councilman is mindful of the history of the street, but again, politics...). 

 

If the city wants to spend tax dollars to clean up this section of Euclid, I'm all for that.  Since we don't have a choice, and the hospital will be here, I guess I can be ok with that.  But DAMMIT... do we have to put in ANOTHER surface parking lot on this street?  Can't we have one project which is catered towards the pedestrian first, and the automobile second?  Argh...

 

 

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Geis and Coyne families float plans for technology center on Euclid Avenue

By Michelle Jarboe, The Plain Dealer

November 18, 2009, 5:52PM

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2009/11/geis_and_coyne_families_float.html

 

Below is the most disturbing paragraph from the article:

 

Without financial assistance, Geis said the tech center would need to charge rents of about $20 per square foot in a market where tenants are willing to pay only $12 to $15. The disparity is due partly to high land costs and partly to the project design, which calls for a more suburban-style, single-story building surrounded by hundreds of parking spots.

That style of building does not mesh with zoning guidelines, which call for multiple stories and a range of uses on that portion of Euclid Avenue. Geis said he is trying to compete with suburban properties and provide suburban amenities, like safe and ample parking, in an urban environment.

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Major demolition underway at future site of hospital. This would make about 8 blocks in a row of undeveloped land once they come down. And just 3 blocks down is the other demo project.

 

2 if not 3 large warehouses about to be taken down at Euclid/Chester/E. 60th, fenced off, top floors windows blown out. Thing is - this property is actively listed for sale on Colliers website.

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Is that a new listing? Is there a way to tell?


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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American Sugar expansion plan would nearly double Cleveland plant's size

By Michelle Jarboe, The Plain Dealer

December 08, 2009, 5:29PM

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A sour economy hasn't killed America's sweet tooth.

As John Mitchell points out, people still need to eat. And whether they're ordering at Red Lobster or doctoring their coffee at home, millions of consumers are using sweeteners packaged at the Cleveland plant that Mitchell manages.

The facility, on East 65th Street between Euclid and Carnegie avenues, has been growing for several years. American Sugar Refining Inc., a manufacturing affiliate of sugar giant Domino Foods Inc., has spent approximately $6 million since 2004 on equipment, new packaging lines and other improvements. Now the company wants to spend $3 million to $8 million more on an expansion that would nearly double the plant's size.

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Major demolition underway at future site of hospital. This would make about 8 blocks in a row of undeveloped land once they come down. And just 3 blocks down is the other demo project.

 

2 if not 3 large warehouses about to be taken down at Euclid/Chester/E. 60th, fenced off, top floors windows blown out. Thing is - this property is actively listed for sale on Colliers website.

 

Does someone have pictures of those warhouses?  Or maybe someone could get them for me.

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Major demolition underway at future site of hospital. This would make about 8 blocks in a row of undeveloped land once they come down. And just 3 blocks down is the other demo project.

 

2 if not 3 large warehouses about to be taken down at Euclid/Chester/E. 60th, fenced off, top floors windows blown out. Thing is - this property is actively listed for sale on Colliers website.

 

Does someone have pictures of those warhouses? Or maybe someone could get them for me.

 

Check their website:

http://www.loopnet.com/looplink/colliersintl_us/searchresultsmap.aspx?SearchType=FSFL&VIEWSTATEID=86955192&PgCxtGuid=853ca342-ab7d-44d1-9dd0-d22b7a9e3fd8&PgCxtCurFLKey=LooplinkSearchPage&name=colliersintl&LooplinkRadioButton=FSFL&QryRadioPropertyType=40&QryRadioCountryList=US%2cUS&QryRadioStateList=OH&QryRadioCity=cleveland&UOMMoneyCurrencyDropDown1=USD&UOMListingDropDown1=USI&QryRadioLooplinkSubmit=Begin+Search&ReturnTargetUrl=%2fxNet%2fLoopLink%2fLoopLinks%2fcolliersintl_us%2fqryradio.aspx&R_LL_RB=FSFL&R_QR_C=cleveland&R_QR_CountryList=US&R_QR_PT=40

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Does anybody know what is going on with the Upper Chester project.  The City Planning Commission still has a start date of summer 2009.  Is this project dead?

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^please...have you heard anything about a credit crunch and a morbid real estate market...all the kids are talking about it.

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Agreed about the snarky tone but seriously mick7012- if there's any substantial residential project that's been stalled (like Upper Chester), 99% of the time it will be because of the economic/market conditions. The fact that it's in Unversity Circle might give it a better chance once conditions improve but until then, we probably won't see much movement on it.

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Some possible rumblings of the Agora moving/donating to CMSD:

 

Saturday, February 13, 2010

 

Cleveland Rock icon the Agora's future is in flux

Owner offers the building to Cleveland schools

WKSU's Vivian Goodman reports

 

 

The owner of the Cleveland Agora wants to donate it to the Cleveland schools and make the landmark in rock and roll history the new home of the Cleveland School of the Arts.

 

He's looking for a smaller location and has offered his building to the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. The Cleveland School of the Arts building at University Circle is dilapidated and the district plans to rebuild or move. But Lo Conti says the district doesn't seem too interested in the Agora and will likely rebuild at University Circle. He maintains that's largely because of unfounded fears about safety at the 50th and Euclid location.

 

MORE AT http://www.wksu.org/news/story/24915

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Sad that the city that hosts the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame can't even keep a rock icon like this open.  I mean, are we really as passionate about rock and roll as the CVB would have outsiders believe?

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I floated an Agora-centic idea for this area a few months back, and it was heartily shot down.  NOTHING shall impede the city's suburban light-industrial vision for Euclid Avenue.  What we need right in the middle of Cleveland is Brook Park Road with bus shelters.  Because that's what every successful city does, right?  We'll take jobs any way we can get them, even if it makes the city so unappealing and dysfuncional it prevents ten times as much development from happening in the future.

 

Our basic governing philosophies must change, in dramatic fashion, before this city can turn itself around. 

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I mean, are we really as passionate about rock and roll as the CVB would have outsiders believe?

 

really?

 

the cleveland music scene is vibrant, supporting a more active music venues and musicians than most cities. the agora was a part of that, but it faltered, both in bad decisions, and in bad booking. I am no more a fan of the rock and roll city bullshit manifested in the form of stupid guitar "sculptures" on every street corner. but really, every city with a music scene has clubs that close. it's a business. you see it in austin and nyc, as well as cleveland.

 

the age of the large music club is passing. because bands make most of their money on tour and in licensing, shows are more common, and draw smaller crowds. venues that can respond to this and adapt will be more successful. the agora was not just a relic of another time, it was a bit of dinosaur.

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Two startup companies ready to move into Cleveland's Midtown neighborhood

By CHUCK SODER

11:07 am, February 22, 2010

 

Two startup companies — including one started by the man who founded IQS Inc. in North Olmsted — each have raised about $1 million from investors in Taiwan and soon will be living and working together in Cleveland's Midtown neighborhood.

 

The companies — business process software company Silico Corp. and electronic device maker Ardent Products Corp. — plan to move into the former Hill Floral Products distribution building at 6401 Midtown Commerce Park Drive this September. Ardent bought the 23,500-square-foot building in December for $665,000 and is in the process of remodeling it.

 

READ MORE AT:

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20100222/FREE/100229980


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2010/02/35_million_mixed-use_developme.html

 

$35 million mixed-use development proposed for Midtown Cleveland site

By Michelle Jarboe, The Plain Dealer February 22, 2010, 3:44PM

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Architect and real estate investor Richard Bowen hopes to build medical offices, homes, stores and restaurants on former industrial property in Cleveland's Midtown neighborhood.

 

Through Shaker Associates LLC, Bowen has signed an agreement to buy 1.78 acres just south of Chester Avenue, near the Dunham Tavern Museum. The city of Cleveland is seeking a state grant of more than $190,000 to cover an environmental analysis of the site, which has been used for welding, auto repair and a range of manufacturing.

 

Bowen, president and owner of Richard L. Bowen + Associates of Cleveland, envisions a $35 million project on the property. The development could include a 70,000-square-foot medical office building, 150 homes for seniors, 14,000 square feet of retail and two restaurants. According to the state grant application, the project would produce 245 jobs and $1.3 million in annual property tax revenues for Cleveland.

 

.........

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