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Cleveland: Midtown: Development and News

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This will be not be built poorly, it has to be built upto MMID code, for once, new construction falls in the zone this time, not outside of it. Any parking lots will be behind the building or in the form of a parking deck. Obviously, none of this has been drafted up yet, but I am only going on what the zoning for MidTown states.

 

People, I would love to see MidTown developed full of lofts, condo's, and live-work space. But who are you kidding when you suggest this is a huge setback, as if this is the only remaining land in MidTown, or more importantly, on Euclid? I can name 50 parcels of land ON EUCLID that are more suitable for condo's than this site. E. 71st near Baker Motors and the "Marous Brothers" project is much more realistic, as is anywhere around The Agora or NEORSD.

 

This is 500 new jobs on Euclid, 300 more people living inside, and 100's of visitors per day. Now even if only 10 people move to the area, it's better than none. Even if only 50 of the workers leave the hospital to go eat at a nearby restaurant, that's better than none. Doctors, nurses, aides, and psychiatric specialists are high paying jobs that require medical degrees. Do we not want 500 of them on Euclid? Would you prefer a skatepark? Would you prefer the continued presence of a grassy field? Or would you prefer this hospital be built in the greenfield space next to the new juvi center in the middle of the forgotten triangle?

 

The comparison of a psychiatric hospital to section 8 housing, homeless people, or criminals is absurd -- the patients will never leave the facility and more likely than not, you'll never enter it! Many middle-class and upper-class people have family members - siblings, children, parents who live in a psychiatric hospital and they visit them. This is not going to be crack addicts getting a visit from their crack addict spouse.

 

This might or might not produce new spin-off development, but give me a break. We'd be complaining if this were built in the suburbs and now we're complaining that it's being built here. It's a hospital, a rather large one, and if anyone thinks it stole the place of condo's, you're kidding only yourself. There is nothing urban about living on that portion of Euclid. Where can you walk to? There is NOTHING walkable in under 10 blocks. Gust Gallucci's?

 

Chester 82 is on the backburner and until that is built or Beacon Place is completed (also on hold), as well as the Marous Brother's proposed project at E. 71st and Euclid, we can't even begin to hope for any residential at E. 55th and Euclid. This land has no potential to be used for college dorms or residential. There is so much land available adjacent to CSU's campus as well as 3 private developments currently underway adjacent to the campus; CSU is 30 blocks away and even if this land would make good use for it, there will be no demand short-term with all that is already being built (or about to be built) on the campus.

 

Just remember, this nearly-100 million dollar hospital will be built right in the center of the "HEALTHLINE". I would rather high-tech or live-work in this area, but a large hospital is a long-term investment into the community. There's probably not a single Urbanohio'er who would feel comfortable walking around E. 55th and Euclid at 3am. When the hospital is up and running with security, surveillance, a 24/7 staff, and lighting, you'll feel like you're in a civilized setting, which is hardly the case right now. Right now, it's a scene out of Assault On Precinct 13's streetscapes. BTW - The other 2 projects proposed for Euclid are a whole different story and I would save your barking for those.

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The problem is that this isn't the highest and best use for a site that is so well positioned and invested into for street level interaction.  I understand what you're saying biz, but this is a very short sited development decision on a thoroughfare that we knew would not make a 180 degree turn over night.  Cities are never really complete, and making the right decisions right now can affect the way things develop for decades.  Putting a psych ward in the middle of Euclid is not a wise forward looking option.

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I totally agree. This is a typical decision out of desperation .. because Cleveland is bleeding jobs, etc.

 

Cleveland seriously needs to start considering and planning for the future, not just for today. If it wants to truly turn around and bring itself into the future in a smart and progressive way, it needs to start making DECISIONS that reflect that .. and sometimes that means waiting for something better to come along, not just jumping at every opportunity that comes along!

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^ BizBiz please read the long version Midtown Inc plan before citing it.  The long version zones this area very differently than the short one does.  I think even the short one, if you actually look at the map, shows an industrial park spanning both sides of Euclid at that point.  The short one with the MMU- whatevers is downright misleading.  The plan is for Euclid to be a business park from I-90 to E79th St.

 

I guess there's not much you can walk to around there, other than Dave's, half the Asiatown stores and restaraunts, a thrift store, a diner on Prospect, a recently opened restaurant at 36th, and indeed Gust Galluci's.  I lived there for about a year, so I know what it has and what it doesn't have.  The anti-Midtown attitudes I'm hearing from a lot of folks here are cynical and misinformed.   

 

There is a solid neighborhood framework in this area-- moreso than there is from 71st to 79th.  If the BRT to be leveraged into anything urban, this is the spot.  It has anchors, in particular the Agora, and it has enough empty or easily-cleared land nearby to build something with critical mass. 

 

The area from 55th westward, other than the county's parking lot for which there's no replacement, is full.  It's full.  I'd like to see new residential there but it's full.  If you don't believe me, please tell me which new structures you think they'll let us knock down to build a neighborhood.  They won't.  Maybe everything from 30th to the innerbelt will come down for residential, but I don't see that happening either.  So where are all these contiguous developable sections of Euclid I keep hearing about?  I only see one, around 55th.  I triple dog dare you to list 50 comparable parcels.

 

Every theory I hear about Euclid being wrong for residential really makes me wonder why the BRT was ever built, with a stop on every block.  That simply isn't done anywhere on earth to serve an industrial park. 

 

And if you don't think people have issues living next to a psych ward, I guess you haven't read any of the court cases about that exact issue.  For a lot of people it's a dealbreaker.  If that's not the case for you, that's very noble.  But from a development perspective this thing will NOT draw residents, in fact it will be kryptonite.   

 

I would absolutely prefer this be built near the new juvie center.  That would be 7-8 times smarter than tying up Euclid Ave with another inert box of gloom.  Those people visiting their relative at the psych ward-- are they happy about it?  Is this the impression we want people to have about Euclid Avenue, oh no what's to become of my sister?  Isn't there anywhere else that kind of tragedy could play out?  Anywhere else?  You don't see any negative associations there at all? 

 

Moreover, the fact that the typical Euclid Ave resident or pedestrian would never enter this facility is PRECISELY why it doesn't belong on Euclid.  I don't know how I could make that any plainer at this point.

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A mixed-use psych ward?  Really?  High-security installations don't mix well with anything.  It could be a psych ward or a place where they develop new fruit roll-up flavors... either way, it is off limits to everyone and that's the problem.  It adds a pedestrian dead zone to a street already struggling with them.

 

 

I NEVER said that the psych ward itself would be a mixed-use development and if it was read that way I truly apologize.

 

What I did say is that if done correctly it would not negatively impact people's interest/inclination in walking or living in that area.

 

I also pointed out that if this works in other areas it could work in Cleveland, but you think that other areas are so special (like having a beach) that those areas can afford to get away with poor planning.  Whereas Cleveland has to have everything be perfect otherwise, oooooohhhhh ahhhhhhhh, the big bad gremlin will get me when I walk by the psych ward on my way to the office building or condo next door.  :-)

 

Psychiatric institutions work very well in other cities* and will work in Euclid as well.  It would be a bonus (and I'm all for bombarding anyone to assure us of this) if they also design this appropriately so that it fits inside a mixed-use <b>neighborhood</b>.

 

 

No, putting a psych ward at 55th wouldn't do much harm to the existing situation for pedestrians.  But it would do immeasurable harm to any potential improvements to the situation.

 

I also never meant to say that the existing situation was the reason people would or would not walk.  What I meant to say is that either people have a disposition to walk/live in urban settings or they do not and a psych ward is not going to change that pre-disposition.

 

Granted, a badly designed and implemented psych ward will definitely exacerbate their negative inclinations.

 

I not only share your enthusiasm for Midtown, but when I lived in Cleveland I would drive up/down Euclid almost every day imagining it as it must have been many years ago.  I also, would constantly shop at Galluci's and at the old Taco Bell on 55th and at one of the many neighborhood fried chicken places in the area.  Yep, the owners would almost have heart attacks when the white-hispanic would walk in the door.  I think they thought I would get shot or something.

 

I did this despite it being way out of the way (I lived in the Warehouse District, but worked in Chagrin).  In fact, the last time I was in Cleveland (for Valentine's Day...yes I took my wife and daughter up to Cleveland, instead of to the beach, to celebrate Valentine's) I specifically forced my friend to drive me from downtown to university circle on Euclid so that I could see the progress.  I do this because I still dream of the day that Euclid is once again packed with people.

 

Oh, and, when my wife and I studied at CWRU we would gladly take the #6 up/down Euclid even though it felt like a death wish everytime you got on that bus.

 

Having said all that, if not being opposed to a well-designed psych ward negates all the other great things I think/dream about for Euclid then, you and Oldmanladyluck can be the "insane" ones and I'll keep my sanity, thank you very much.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*I did a quick search for "psychiatric hospitals in Manhattan" no less than six institutions showed up and guess what, most of them are in the well-to-do areas of the city.

 

http://maps.google.com/maps?client=safari&oe=UTF-8&ie=UTF8&q=psychiatric+hospital&fb=1&split=1&gl=us&ei=b0FSStO8OY2_lAeM7tW7Dg&radius=4.76&sll=40.735291,-73.995323&sspn=0.077003,0.181789&rq=1&ll=40.773132,-73.957043&spn=0,359.818211&z=13&iwloc=lyrftr:lmq:0:psychiatric+hospital,1996386165916928997,40.769882,-73.952923&layer=c&cbll=40.769891,-73.952916&panoid=EqRekKOrvqMtX50mcBVdtg&cbp=12,29.99,,0,2.88

 

 

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Got my reply from Bob Brown...

 

Dear Oldmanladyluck:

 

 

 

Thank you for writing about the future of Euclid Avenue in Midtown.  The City continues to support the vision for mixed-use development with technology and bio-medical uses, complemented by pedestrian-oriented/transit-oriented housing and retail.  We believe that the proposed developments can contribute to that vision, particularly if the buildings are properly designed and sited to promote pedestrian activity and transit use.  All of the proposed uses are relatively high-density uses.  The mental health hospital will bring hundreds of new employees to this portion of Euclid Avenue – employees and visitors who can use the transit line and patronize restaurants and stores.  Also, significant amounts of vacant and underutilized land and buildings will remain open for development and re-use along this portion of Euclid Avenue .  The City is committed to working with Midtown Cleveland and others to facilitate development and uses that are consistent with the Midtown plan.

 

 

 

Please feel free to get back to me if you have further questions.

 

 

 

Robert N. Brown, Director

 

Cleveland City Planning Commission

 

rnbrown@city.cleveland.oh.us

 

Tel: 216-664-3467  Fax: 216-664-3281

 

Web Site:  http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us

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I'm not exactly sure I'd call places 20+ blocks west and 4-5 avenues north part of a walkable neighborhood.  Or at least I'll say I don't think you're going to find any developers to buy into that train of thought.

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When I think of "mixed use development" being right next to "bio-medical uses" I think of Resident Evil.  Not the first one, I mean the one where they did all that in the middle of a freaking city.  If our concept is matching residential with bio-tech, our concept is bunk.  These are two things that actually need to be segregated.  And the idea that these workers will ride a bus that only goes down Euclid is laughable.  So funny I could cry. 

 

Again, there is all kinds of private land near the Cleveland Clinic and it's never developed in the way we're being told the area around this hospital will develop.  Neither has W 25th north of Bridge.  This is being done for the Mayor's short term political gain and that's all there is to it.  Replace "hospital" with "slaughterhouse" or "paper factory" employing 500 and see if jobs are ever, ever, ever the only thing a responsible planner must consider.

 

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Well, all I can say after reading these posts is...if it happens..and you can't hide it, then decorate it! At least make it the best it can be. No big setbacks, give it some curb appeal. I still prefer these to be set on the side streets as there are plenty of other areas for it.

 

Wait...come to think of this again....  This whole issue is about the stigma attached to a kook hospital. Ok.. I tend to agree that as Cleveland's main and grand avenue, we should not have it serving as a tribute and testament to ill-social health. That irritates me as much as I see countless people abusing disability tags, hanging from their car mirrors as though they were some sort of air freshener....advertising to the world how sick we are.

 

Now we will present ill social health along the main avenue through Cleveland. I think this say something about where priorities have evolved.

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I'm not exactly sure I'd call places 20+ blocks west and 4-5 avenues north part of a walkable neighborhood.  Or at least I'll say I don't think you're going to find any developers to buy into that train of thought.

 

Then what was the purpose of all those BRT stops, and what was the purpose of all that talk about bringing people to Euclid Avenue?  How many families have to be torn apart by mental illness so that people are brought to Euclid Avenue?  You renovate your main street for a billion dollars for the purpose of building things there which no one would ever want to visit or live by?

 

Regarding geography, I don't know where you're getting your info.  It certainly isn't from having lived there.  If you're at Euclid and 55th and you can't walk to something on Payne Avenue, which is 3 avenues up, you need a Jazzy Power Chair right now.  The thrift store is directly adjacent to this intersection and Galluci's is about a 10 minute walk.  And when we're counting blocks E-W, remember that there's only about a block and half between 55th and 40th here.

 

Seriously, the only problem holding this area back is the fact everyone in town hates it.  So now it's a dumping ground for "jobs" that nobody wants near their home, even though we just spent all that money to give it a chance as a functional urban main street.

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when talking biomed how come you always want to imagine the umbrella company?  what about technology... medical devices, and implants... that stuff is hardly biohazzard stay away type stuff.  having the midtown technology center, (which was to front euclid with no setback) between 59th and 61st, and in a later phase between 57th and 59th with hundreds of workers on upper floors and 1st floor "retail", probably defined as a cafe or restaurant... would have made your dreams of residential in the rest of the area much more attainable.  The biggest problem with the hospital is perception, which will be very difficult to overcome.  Still doesn't sting nearly as much as the subsidized housing in the east 70's.  That will absolutely drive away market rate investment there.

 

If we really wanted residential at this intersection it'd best be put west of the bridge where that autocentric crap is, where the empty "midtown center" and clark station are.  It'd be significantly more linked to the main draw of the area in the agora.  You could even incorporate that odd C.A.A.A building (i have no idea what this is, but it appears to be a historic facade hiding).  Of course what hampers any such idea from hatching in this area is that it would take such a substantial investment.  No developer in their right mind is going to plop up 1 new building.  Not enough around, too risky.  You'd need something on the scale of uptown to draw enough interest, and I don't think anyone believes that's possible right now.  Hell I know one very prominent local developer who won't even sniff a project if they don't believe they can't turn at LEAST at 13.5% profit.  These guys aren't philanthropists playing sim city and just saying, wouldn't it be cool if... or I'll put something here and hope it catches on...

 

The hospital is short sighted, the subsidized housing is the worst... idea... ever...

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And the idea that these workers will ride a bus that only goes down Euclid is laughable.  So funny I could cry. 

 

Sorry, I can't resist...with my best Joe Pesci impersonation:

 

So you thought I was funny when I rode the #6 to go to school/downtown?  Funny, like how, like a clown?!?!

 

:shoot:

 

:-)

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I got a VERY similar same email response from Bob Brown as did Oldmanladyluck

 

 

'Thank you for sharing your thoughts about the future of Euclid Avenue in Midtown.  The City continues to support the vision of Euclid Avenue in Midtown as a place for mixed-use development, with offices, housing and retail, in a pedestrian-oriented/ transit-oriented development.  We are confident that the recently proposed uses can be designed and sited in a manner that will contribute to realizing this vision for Euclid Avenue.  We will continue working to pursue development that is in accordance with the plan and the zoning for Midtown.  Please feel free to get back to me if you have further comments.  Again, thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts.'

 

 

 

Robert N. Brown, Director

 

Cleveland City Planning Commission

 

rnbrown@city.cleveland.oh.us

 

Tel: 216-664-3467  Fax: 216-664-3281

 

Web Site:  http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us

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Sure, you can do biomedical research in our new technology center, as long as it's not this or this or this or this or this or this because there's a restaraunt downstairs from your lab.  I know biomed isn't all Resident Evil, which was a poor metaphor on my part, but I used to be in the business of cleaning up after this stuff and you don't want it above a restaraunt even if it's a million miles from Resident Evil.  Manufacturing, even of innocuous little devices, involves all kinds of hazardous chemicals.  Maybe 350 days out of the year they don't need the special solvent, but sometimes they do.  So if they can't ever use their special solvent, they're not going to locate here.

 

If we're going to go after biomed, let's do it.  This isn't the way to do it.  High end research likes to be off on its own... it's the one instance where suburban style segregated land use really makes sense.  There are also some intellectual property issues bearing on this which I don't want to get into, but trust me not much of this biomed stuff is going on top of a restaraunt.  It just isn't a nutritious part of your mixed-use breakfast. 

 

The entire plan we're discussing, if that's the plan, is bunk.  Are they attempting to plan "biomedical cluster" with residents scattered throughout, and not have a single hazmat consultant at the table?  I don't think that's wise, and I don't think the end result will have many takers on the commercial or residential ends.

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And the idea that these workers will ride a bus that only goes down Euclid is laughable.  So funny I could cry. 

 

Sorry, I can't resist...with my best Joe Pesci impersonation:

 

So you thought I was funny when I rode the #6 to go to school/downtown?  Funny, like how, like a clown?!?!

 

:shoot:

 

:-)

 

I did that too, but I'm a freak who lived, worked, and went to school on Euclid Avenue and who loves transit.  I don't think for a minute that a hospital full of suburban workers is going to mimic my habits or yours.  What I meant by the quoted statement is that the BRT only serves to link attractions that are located on or near Euclid Avenue.  Unless you live on Euclid (ding ding ding let's build residential) it plays no part in getting you home from work.  If it gives you a 2-seat 2-hour trip to Strongsville... so what?  It's not a commuter line and nobody's going to use it for that... unless both ends of the "commute" somehow involve Euclid Avenue.

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I with you BizBiz.  Agreed on almost all of your points.  Good point about the visitors/families.  I will add that these hospitals have rotational shifts working around the clock, so it is not a business development where the employees all disappear to the suburbs after 5 p.m.

 

Also agree with McCleveland that the subsidized housing is the much more troubling development proposed for Midtown in the past few weeks.  Terrible, terrible idea, especially considering that the location (unlike the location proposed for the Hospital) is ripe for residential development or at least REALISTICALLY could be within the next 10-15 years.

 

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Man... somebody better tell these people to stop building the johns Hopkins science and technology park complete with restaurants, retail, and housing.  These people might all die.  Ditto for the East River Science park in Manhattan.  We definitely should make sure we stay away from doing anything like this.

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Man... somebody better tell these people to stop building the johns Hopkins science and technology park complete with restaurants, retail, and housing.  These people might all die.  Ditto for the East River Science park in Manhattan.  We definitely should make sure we stay away from doing anything like this.

 

East River Science Park or Fifth Avenue Science Park?  They made a choice and they made it for a reason.  The Johns Hopkins plan, based on their aerial rendering and description, is intended primarily as a job site.  If you look at where they're placing it, it's off to the side of the university in Baltimore's downtown-university duality... it's not directly between them!  That's where main street goes! 

 

Baltimore's is also promoted as a modern industrial park with one incidental bullet point about residential and services.  It isn't clear how or if that aspect will work out, or whether they've put much thought into it at all.  We haven't, so I'm not sure they have either.

 

Is either city expecting a project like that to remake its main thoroghfare into an active pedestrian zone?  I don't think they are, but I haven't been following their news.  A lot of these issues I'm raising are context-dependent.  Is this plan better than a stick in the eye?  Yes it is.  Is it better than losing 500 jobs to Morocco?  Indeed.  But those are insane benchmarks to use, when we just spent a billion dollars rebuilding Euclid Avenue specifically for pedestrians, and these developments could go anywhere in Cleveland besides that street.

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Sure, you can do biomedical research in our new technology center, as long as it's not this or this or this or this or this or this because there's a restaraunt downstairs from your lab. I know biomed isn't all Resident Evil, which was a poor metaphor on my part, but I used to be in the business of cleaning up after this stuff and you don't want it above a restaraunt even if it's a million miles from Resident Evil. Manufacturing, even of innocuous little devices, involves all kinds of hazardous chemicals. Maybe 350 days out of the year they don't need the special solvent, but sometimes they do. So if they can't ever use their special solvent, they're not going to locate here.

 

If we're going to go after biomed, let's do it. This isn't the way to do it. High end research likes to be off on its own... it's the one instance where suburban style segregated land use really makes sense. There are also some intellectual property issues bearing on this which I don't want to get into, but trust me not much of this biomed stuff is going on top of a restaraunt. It just isn't a nutritious part of your mixed-use breakfast.

 

The entire plan we're discussing, if that's the plan, is bunk. Are they attempting to plan "biomedical cluster" with residents scattered throughout, and not have a single hazmat consultant at the table? I don't think that's wise, and I don't think the end result will have many takers on the commercial or residential ends.

 

I'm in the area of biomedical/chemical research and am familiar with all the regulations, but I have to say I don't really understand why you think they have to be segregated (not trying to pick a fight here).  As long as food for sale isn't transported in the same elevator or what not as lab stuff, there isn't a problem.  As long as the organic chemistry or infectious diseases labs are on the top floor, there's no problem.

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I'm in the area of biomedical/chemical research and am familiar with all the regulations, but I have to say I don't really understand why you think they have to be segregated (not trying to pick a fight here).  As long as food for sale isn't transported in the same elevator or what not as lab stuff, there isn't a problem.  As long as the organic chemistry or infectious diseases labs are on the top floor, there's no problem.

 

Not trying to fight, but do you do your biochemical research in a residential building?  And that part about "as long as food for sale isn't..." comes into play more than you'd think.  A lot more than you'd think.  In fact, you don't even want to think about it. 

 

All I'm saying is that these two goals we have, for the exact same place, aren't 100% compatible.  I'm not claiming they're 100% in-compatible, I'm claiming there's enough of an issue there that... given the context... we should reconsider these plans.

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I'm in the area of biomedical/chemical research and am familiar with all the regulations, but I have to say I don't really understand why you think they have to be segregated (not trying to pick a fight here). As long as food for sale isn't transported in the same elevator or what not as lab stuff, there isn't a problem. As long as the organic chemistry or infectious diseases labs are on the top floor, there's no problem.

 

Not trying to fight, but do you do your biochemical research in a residential building? And that part about "as long as food for sale isn't..." comes into play more than you'd think. A lot more than you'd think. In fact, you don't even want to think about it.

 

All I'm saying is that these two goals we have, for the exact same place, aren't 100% compatible. I'm not claiming they're 100% in-compatible, I'm claiming there's enough of an issue there that... given the context... we should reconsider these plans.

 

I get what you're saying, and no, I don't live in the building I work in (although as a graduate student, that's debatable :().  However, very sick hospital patients sleep just across the street from my building.  My dorm in undergrad was just across the Adelbert bridge.  Even if a restaurant and a lab aren't in exactly the same building, they can co-exist in a small area.

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CHN Wins State Funding for 3 Affordable Housing Projects

 

On July 2nd, the Ohio Housing Finance Agency announced tax credit awards for 3 CHN affordable housing projects--the maximum number of awards to a single developer allowed by the State. The projects represent 138 affordable housing units for low-income families, chronically homeless individuals and young women aging out of foster care. The announcements included 39 tax credit awards statewide.

 

CHN funded projects include:

 

Cleveland Green Homes II — 45 single-family homes

CHN will acquire vacant, abandoned homes in Cleveland’s six Strategic Investment Initiative areas, renovating the homes using Green Communities standards adopted by Enterprise Community Partners. Three of the 45 homes will be new, fully handicap-accessible homes. Combined with two projects that received Tax Credits last year (Cleveland Green Homes and Cleveland Green Homes East) these projects will add a total of 121 affordable, single-family green homes to CHN’s Lease Purchase portfolio. The Lease Purchase program allows families who could not otherwise achieve homeownership to lease a home at an affordable rate with the option to purchase after 15 years of responsible residency.  

The State’s funding announcement of Emerald Alliance V (CHN’s fifth permanent supportive housing project located at 7515 Euclid Avenue), marks a combined investment of $25 million dollars by CHN in this once blighted section of Euclid Avenue.

 

Emerald Alliance V – 70 apartments for chronically homeless

CHN was also awarded Tax Credits to build a 70-unit apartment building at 7515 Euclid Avenue for chronically homeless individuals. Part of Cuyahoga County’s Housing First Initiative, the project represents CHN’s fifth permanent supportive housing project in Cleveland done in collaboration with experienced partners EDEN, Inc. and Mental Health Services. Based on national best-practice models, Housing First seeks to end long-term chronic homelessness among single individuals. The model is demonstrating success both nationally and locally. The local model has seen just 1% of Housing First residents return to homelessness.

 

The State’s funding announcement of Emerald Alliance V (CHN’s fifth permanent supportive housing project located at 7515 Euclid Avenue), marks a combined investment of $25 million dollars by CHN in this once blighted section of Euclid Avenue.

 

Independence Place — 23 apartments for homeless youth

A partnership with the YWCA will allow CHN to develop permanent supportive housing for young women aging out of foster care. Twenty three units will be developed on the second floor of the YWCA building on Prospect Avenue near East 40th. The YWCA is the owner and manager while CHN is the developer and supervising property manager.

 

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Emerald Alliance V – 70 apartments for chronically homeless

 

The State’s funding announcement of Emerald Alliance V (CHN’s fifth permanent supportive housing project located at 7515 Euclid Avenue), marks a combined investment of $25 million dollars by CHN in this once blighted section of Euclid Avenue.

 

 

Boy.... we owe the State a solid for fixing the 'blight' with this project.  It should spur other meaningful investment in the area.  Plus, the BRT will efficiently shuttle the panhandlers to and from public square and other parts of downtown.  I see nothing but positives.  :drunk: 

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Hts44121, could not agree more. Absolutely the worst possible development to go there. I'm not going to argue that you need to have these sorts of services, but you also need to protect your public investment. CHN has property on Chester, a block away from the Health Line. There is absolutely no reason to build this on Euclid other than to satisfy some misconceived notion of status for the people in charge of CHN's mission.

 

The City should get involved and basically not allow this kind of development on the Euclid Corridor. Of course, the City will probably is pushing for it, so whatever. All I can do is shake my head.

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Emerald Alliance V 70 apartments for chronically homeless

 

The States funding announcement of Emerald Alliance V (CHNs fifth permanent supportive housing project located at 7515 Euclid Avenue), marks a combined investment of $25 million dollars by CHN in this once blighted section of Euclid Avenue.

 

 

Boy.... we owe the State a solid for fixing the 'blight' with this project. It should spur other meaningful investment in the area. Plus, the BRT will efficiently shuttle the panhandlers to and from public square and other parts of downtown. I see nothing but positives.   :drunk:

 

At first I thought 327 was over-reacting when he went off about the psychiatric hospital on 55th, but that, with this? Oy vey. Just what you want to re-establish the former grandeur of Cleveland's primary corridor btwn UC and downtown. Methodone clinic anyone?

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I moved this over from the random cleveland developments as these are all located in midotwn.

 

I think everyone is in agreement that this is a putrid use of Euclid Avenue.

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If my addition is correct, the housing mentioned here only equates to about 150 new low-income residents in the area.  If this is drawn in contrast to other proposed development, I think everyone is over-reacting. 

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If my addition is correct, the housing mentioned here only equates to about 150 new low-income residents in the area.  If this is drawn in contrast to other proposed development, I think everyone is over-reacting. 

 

The shear number of low income residents not withstanding, my issue is the stigma this will put on potential business in the area.

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In all fairness, I think most of these permanent supportive housing projects have been well managed.  But this is an awful lot to see in one area.

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isn't there already low income housing in Cleveland? Maybe I don't understand the difference, but it would seem to me that market forces in Cleveland have created a good deal of low and moderate income options for housing.

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^Yes, there is an abundance of low income housing around this area, which is why we are so heated over this decision.  Why the FRACK put this on Euclid?  The same Euclid we just spent $400 million tax dollars on?  The same Euclid with so much potential, including in Midtown?

 

I hate this.

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isn't there already low income housing in Cleveland? Maybe I don't understand the difference, but it would seem to me that market forces in Cleveland have created a good deal of low and moderate income options for housing.

 

Yes, there is.  A Lot, too.  The permanent supportive housing model that is being discussed here goes beyond just being low income housing, though.  It is a model of housing that is meant to provide people who have been chronically homeless with a stable housing situation first and foremost, and access to social services and the rest later.  I really like the model.  I wish it wasn't being placed along Euclid Ave, however.

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"Yes, there is.  A Lot, too.  The permanent supportive housing model that is being discussed here goes beyond just being low income housing, though.  It is a model of housing that is meant to provide people who have been chronically homeless with a stable housing situation first and foremost, and access to social services and the rest later.  I really like the model.  I wish it wasn't being placed along Euclid Ave, however."

 

I agree, nice model, bad location.

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