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Cleveland Foundation’s potential move to Dunham Tavern land in Midtown draws ire

Updated 11:05 AM; Today 5:00 AM

By Jordyn Grzelewski, The Plain Dealer

 

Those with knowledge of the foundation’s search said the Midtown site is a property at Euclid Avenue and East 66th Street, owned by Dunham Tavern Museum. The foundation confirmed.

 

The proposal to sell and develop this site, which the museum had been turning into a community park, has drawn the ire of some museum members and donors and has divided the 20-person museum board.

 

At the heart of the controversy is the best use of the green space next to the museum. Dunham Tavern, the oldest building in Cleveland at its original location, is now a history museum with a stated vision of providing “an urban green space in Midtown Cleveland and [returning] the tavern to its roots by serving as a place for urban history, education, nature and community.”

 

In 2012, the museum, based at 6709 Euclid Ave., bought 2.28 acres at 6611 Euclid Ave., reincorporating some of the historic site’s original footprint into the museum’s holdings. After a significant fundraising effort, the museum spent more than $900,000 to buy the land and tear down an old industrial building.

 

https://www.cleveland.com/business/2019/03/cleveland-foundations-potential-move-to-dunham-tavern-land-in-midtown-draws-ire.html

Edited by MuRrAy HiLL

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19 minutes ago, Mendo said:

The gas station at E. 55th and Euclid is going to design review next week for demolition. Current owners are Berush Development partners so I don't expect this to be a grass field for too long.

 

Whenever I poke around the E.55th area on Streetview I'm reminded of the Cobb & Bradley building that was demolished 10 years ago. Hopefully Berush can jumpstart some development near this intersection because I'm sick of looking at the empty lots where large buildings once stood.

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2019/PDF/EC-Agenda-3-14-19.pdf

 

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/brd/detailDR.php?ID=3127&CASE=EC 2019-017

 

Project Information

Euclid Corridor Case #  EC 2019-017

Address: 5300-05400 Euclid Ave. / 2008 E 55th Street

Company: Berush Development Partners, LLC

Architect: Tarrify Properties, LLC

 

Whoa.  Fascinating.  Not everyday do you see gas stations getting demoed after all the work if takes to put one into an area. 

 

Certainly optimistic.

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The big developments downtown and in the hot neighborhoods like Ohio City and Little Italy are awesome. But I have even greater hope for my city when I see potential developments like this.

20190310_132755.jpg

Edited by KJP
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"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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More from Midtown....

 

Carnegie Avenue wins friends, influences development

https://www.crainscleveland.com/government/carnegie-avenue-wins-friends-influences-development


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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^ Interesting article. I desperately hope the Warner and Swasey building is renovated. Here is a snippet from the article.

 

Quote

Warner & Swasey complex is crucial component

A key to reinvigorating Carnegie is a decision on the fate of the property that was once the headquarters and manufacturing center of the Warner & Swasey Co., a maker of machine tools, telescopes and other precision instruments. The company occupied the site from the 1880s and from 1904 to 1910 built the 221,727 square feet of one- to five-story buildings that served the company until it shut its doors in 1991.

 

The city of Cleveland has owned the buildings ever since and in January 2018 sought proposals from developers to either renovate the buildings or tear them down and build something new. Vacant, the property has been vandalized and deteriorated significantly.

 

The city received several responses to its request for proposals but has not announced a decision. However, the annual report of the city's economic development department notes that Cleveland has selected Pennrose "to pursue development."

 

An emailed statement from David Ebersole, Cleveland's economic development director, said negotiations with Pennrose are continuing.

"The city is working with Pennrose for a mixed-use redevelopment of the property," the statement said. "The project is currently in the due-diligence phase to determine the costs required to repair the structure and to assemble the necessary project financing."

 

Pennrose is a subsidiary of the Hunt Cos. Both are known across the country for their multifamily affordable housing and mixed-use development projects developed in partnership with public agencies.

 

Of course it's deteriorated over the years. The city left the windows open to the elements on purpose. Why?

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Wow, alot of awesome midtown news today. Regarding the potential Cleveland Foundation relocation to Midtown - why that specific site? If they want to locate in Midtown, there are numerous other vacant lots, including along Euclid, available for new construction. There is even one directly across 66th currently owned by the Cleveland Landbank. Why locate on the Dunham Tavern campus? The Landbank site gives all of the same benefits, without removing contiguous greenspace.

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And one more bit of news out of Midtown:

 

Masonic Temple reborn at 100: inside the mysterious, historic landmark (photos)

By John Petkovic, The Plain Dealer | Posted on March 10, 2019 5:05 AM | Updated March 10, 2019 10:46 AM

 

The Masonic Temple, a mainstay in Cleveland’s cultural life for 100 years, is experiencing a revival. 

 

The hulking 220,000-square-foot complex on East 36th Street and Euclid Avenue has transformed from an architectural curiosity of another era to one of the area’s most opulent, acoustically-rich concert venues. 

 

https://www.cleveland.com/expo/life-and-culture/g66l-2019/03/a7f019d14d3484/masonic-temple-reborn-at-100-inside-the-mysterious-historic-landmark-photos.html

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On 4/5/2019 at 10:01 PM, MyPhoneDead said:

Tru Hilton Update

IMG_20190404_113625.jpg

 

This is a great seed development.  Hopefully more neighborhood business open, that will be dual use for residents and tourist.  Drug Store, Mid Level restaurants, hardware store, coffee shop, etc. neighborhood galleries.  There is such great potential to redevelop just to the West of this site.

 

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Interesting site for an apartment building....

 

Euclid Corridor Design Review Case Report

EAST 70TH STREET APARTMENT BUILDING

 Return to Case List | Start Over | Print Report (PDF format)

Project Information

Euclid Corridor Case #  EC 2019-024

Address:2024 E 70th Street

Company:Grassroots Architecture

Architect:Grassroots Architecture

 

The property was bought on Feb. 28, 2019 by SG at 70th LLC. SG is Sabor Group, a Hungarian-American company run by Michael Avruch. Sabor Group also developed the Euclid Lofts. More...  http://www.sabor.hu/about/

 

2024 East 70th-Sept2014-3.JPG

 

2024 East 70th-Sept2014-2.JPG

 

2024 East 70th-Sept2014.JPG

Edited by KJP
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"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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Turns out that little building is proposed to be demolished for whatever apartment building would replace it.....

 

EAST 70TH STREET DEMOLITION

 Return to Case List | Start Over | Print Report (PDF format)

Project Information

Euclid Corridor Case #  EC 2019-025

Address:2024 E 70th Street

Company:Grassroots Architecture

Architect:TBD

Description:


"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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Warner-Swasey+Masterplan-1.jpg

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2019

Developers discover Midtown's other axis

 

Much of the rebuilding in Cleveland's Midtown, between downtown and University Circle, has focused along the parallel east-west roadways of Euclid, Carnegie and Chester avenues. But the primary north-south axis, East 55th Street, is largely devoid of similar development activity. That's true even where East 55th intersects Euclid, Carnegie and Chester.

Those intersections once had the density and activity of a small downtown called Penn Square, with large apartment and commercial buildings, shops, cafes, theaters, two streetcar lines that carried 150,000 riders per day (as many riders as all of the transit agencies combined serving Northeast Ohio today), and Cleveland's main station for the Pennsylvania Railroad that had 24 daily passenger trains to/from places as far west as St. Louis and as far east as New York City.

 

Today, it is home to social service organizations, gas stations, vacant lots, abandoned buildings, and a City of Cleveland vehicle maintenance garage. That could soon change with two major developments emerging and long-range planning underway.

 

MORE:

https://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2019/04/developers-discover-midtowns-other-axis.html

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"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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^Its been a few weeks since I was over there now, but they were already in the process of demoing the gas station then. The structure was still up, but the parking lot had been torn up and they were tearing thing out of the interior. The whole site was surrounded by fencing and full of heavy equipment. 

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"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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Gyro George, a single-use structure surrounded by parking on Euclid Avenue is slated to be demolished. I checked the ownership which shows that the port authority did a limited warranty deed transfer with itself on April 30, 2019. The port authority had owned the land since 2017. The limited warranty means that the the port authority will accept any responsibility for problems with the property, which will aid in its sale to a future user. Gyro George used to be a gas station (underground tanks, possible leaks, etc) decades ago. The property surrounding the gas station has been owned by the city, part of its land re-utilization program, for 10 years. If combined, the port and city parcels would equal 1 acre...

 

EC 2019-031 7325 Euclid Ave. Demolition C Seeking Final Approval 7325 Euclid Ave. Jeff Epstein, MidTown Cleveland

http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/designreview/drcagenda/2019/PDF/EC-Agenda-5-16-19.pdf

 

Update..... I clicked on the properties around the One Midtown townhouse development across East 73rd Street from Gyro George's and the former furniture liquidation business owned by a notable man named Russell Papalardo (Google his name to learn why he is notable). It turns out the furniture liquidation business property, including the truck trailer storage area behind it, sold earlier this year to a new company called P&D Properties of Euclid LLC. The owner of that business is Russell Papalardo. What's potentially more interesting is that the parking lot behind the liquidation biz was divided up into lots suitably sized for single-family homes.

Edited by KJP
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"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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On 4/7/2019 at 8:57 AM, MyTwoSense said:

 

This is a great seed development.  Hopefully more neighborhood business open, that will be dual use for residents and tourist.  Drug Store, Mid Level restaurants, hardware store, coffee shop, etc. neighborhood galleries.  There is such great potential to redevelop just to the West of this site.

 

Still can't believe there's a Hilton brand hotel on Euclid Avenue in the E 60s.  Amazing.

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"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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5 minutes ago, jeremyck01 said:

^This lawsuit is so dumb.  The board has every right to sell that land.

 

Didn't they fundraise under the auspices the land would remain green space?

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I’d be okay with them keeping it “green space” if it kept with what they espouse as an “urban green space for the Midtown community.”

 

But that land is nothing but grass and looks like a vacant/derelict eyesore—with exception of the “garden” on the Chester side. That area in specific looks like a weed patch surrounded by a fence (that blocks it off from the community). Both are completely disconnected from the community, devoid of nature, devoid of educational opportunity, and completely unaligned with a civic mission. 

 

IMHO, piss or get off the pot, Dunham. 

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https://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20160619/NEWS/160619805/group-plans-to-make-midtown-a-place-to-stay

 

Was driving past 3101 Euclid today and it appeared they had some substantial demolition done.  It looks as though they’re completely replacing the roof.  Was in a car so couldn’t stop to see if there was a construction office.  I know this project has been in a holding pattern for awhile anyone know if this is going forward?

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Glad to hear they're moving forward with that. I was starting to wonder. A rendering from a few years ago....

 

3101_Euclid_Img_12.jpg

 

And a summary of projects at/near Euclid-East 30th from my blog a couple of years ago.....

 

East 30th Station: Innerbelt Buildings; 2728-2800 Euclid Ave., renovation of two adjoining 1960s-era office buildings into modern office and educational spaces for business and culinary incubators; $5 million?; J&M Real Estate Advisors; construction was substantially completed about 2010.

Innerbelt Lofts; 2828 Euclid Ave., renovation of former 58,000-square-foot office building into 50 apartments; $5 million?; Innerbelt Lofts LLC; construction due to be completed in 2018.

University Studios; 2901 Euclid Ave., renovation of 8-story office building into about 130 micro-apartments; $1.7 million; NM Residential; construction was completed in about 2011.

 

The Midtown; 3101 Euclid Ave., renovation of 8-story office building into 80 apartments with a 9th-floor penthouse and ground-floor retail/restaurant; $12 million; Inspiron Group; construction due to be completed in 2018.

 

MORE

https://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2017/08/

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"Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" -- Lady Liberty

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On 5/31/2019 at 8:26 PM, Mendo said:

 

Didn't they fundraise under the auspices the land would remain green space?

I don't see why CF can't purchase and build on one of the many vacant lots nearby. Surely midtown can accommodate both. I don't think its an eye sore at all. but rather an interesting historical site.  To have some modern building juxtaposed next to it wouldn't look right. 

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28 minutes ago, shack said:

I don't see why CF can't purchase and build on one of the many vacant lots nearby. Surely midtown can accommodate both. I don't think its an eye sore at all. but rather an interesting historical site.  To have some modern building juxtaposed next to it wouldn't look right. 

 

I'm on the fence. On one hand, I acknowledge that historic sites and green space are both very important to cities. However, its an empty lot. What are their plans? Can it not be an urban farm, a garden, an actual park... something to benefit the community other than an empty lot?

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14 minutes ago, imjustinjk said:

 

I'm on the fence. On one hand, I acknowledge that historic sites and green space are both very important to cities. However, its an empty lot. What are their plans? Can it not be an urban farm, a garden, an actual park... something to benefit the community other than an empty lot?

I don't know where the boundaries of midtown begin and end but i think its paramount for the community to protect  its defining features (Agora Theatre  Masonic Temple,  Galucci's, Dunham Tavern) as much as possible so that it can develop its own  budding identity.  They shouldn't be encroached upon. 

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28 minutes ago, shack said:

I don't know where the boundaries of midtown begin and end but i think its paramount for the community to protect  its defining features (Agora Theatre  Masonic Temple,  Galucci's, Dunham Tavern) as much as possible so that it can develop its own  budding identity.  They shouldn't be encroached upon. 

 

MidTown isn't a "real neighborhood" per se, rather a bits and pieces of others. Between E. 55th and E. 79th its between Cedar and Carnegie. Between the Innerbelt and E. 55th, its between Payne and Cedar. To your other point, a derelict lot with nothing on it is not a benefit to the neighborhood or its anchoring institutions. I'm all for Dunham Tavern maintaining the lot, but they must do something with it. Ohio City has an urban farm, which is amazing and adds to the growing neighborhood. Just north of Dunham Tavern is Chateau Hough, an urban winery. If they're going to maintain this lot they need to do something with it. They could work with Cleveland Botanical Gardens to expand the learning farm behind Dunham Tavern. I kind of don't understand what the members of the museum want?  Do they just want it to be an empty lot? Dunham Tavern bought the space from RTAv and drew up plans in 2012. Nothing since has materialized.

 

Further, The Cleveland Foundation is one of the most important organizations in the city. Without them, countless projects would have never moved forward that have greatly contributed to the growth of our city. How much space of the 2.5 acres would the Cleveland Foundation take up? There could still be plenty of room for urban green space, which The Cleveland Foundation could get done. 

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Edited by imjustinjk
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^79 to 105 (from Chester to Cedar) is Midtown as well. I find it strange the organization "MidTown Cleveland" excludes this area. What do they call that area, Clevelandclinicland? Its definitely not University Circle. 

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2 minutes ago, Pugu said:

^79 to 105 (from Chester to Cedar) is Midtown as well. I find it strange the organization "MidTown Cleveland" excludes this area. What do they call that area, Clevelandclinicland? Its definitely not University Circle. 

 

Fairfax

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^Not exactly.  Midtown overlaps OTHER neighborhoods.  Fairfax runs from about E.65 and Euclid and all the way to Woodland and what would be woodland and 105.  and Hough runs from E55 to 105.  So Hough and Fairfax cover "Midtown" between 55/65 and 105. Cleveland Clinic is no doubt in Midtown. And no doubt in Hough and Fairfax also. If "Midtown" did not want to overlap with Fairfax and Hough, then it would not exist east of E. 55, but it does.

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That may just be their official service boundaries? I believe that other CDCs operate the rest of MidTown. I've always seen maps define it as between E. 79th and the Innerbelt, but it does make sense that it would run the entire length of Downtown and "Uptown" [UC]. Generally seen as North of Cedar and South of Carnegie, except I guess in AsiaTown area it goes a bit up to Payne as well. However, around Cleveland Clinic you see Fairfax branding and placemaking, not MidTown? I can't recall any branding for MidTown over there off the top of my head. There's also an overarching Health-Tech Corridor that includes parts of Downtown, Midtown, and UC. 

 

The official neighborhood map/SPA map, I think needs to be updated. According the the official map Downtown doesn't extend to the Innerbelt, north and south of CSU. I've always thought it was fully bounded by the Innerbelt, although some weirdos say it stops past the central CBD. I also never hear anyone refer to AsiaTown as Goodrich-Kirtland? Also, I've never heard of Jefferson, nor did many people I spoke to when I was working over there for a class project. Maybe MidTown could become an official neighborhood, but that might step on the toes of some people. 

 

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342698229_ScreenShot2019-06-07at3_53_24PM.thumb.png.cd389f7ba8e617e5d7c6250972d0eb35.png

 

Here's my amazing graphical skills depicting rough boundaries of MidTown, lol.

Edited by imjustinjk

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^Exactly! That's how I see it too. (I wouldn't end Midtown in the horizontal middle of Hough! [at 79 St.]). Thanks for this. As they say,  a picture is worth a thousand words.  So it begs the initial question---why would an organization dedicated to Midtown exclude part of it?  Its not an issue of "branding" a place, as it is what it is whether or not the signs say so. I've never seen a sign in life that says "Industrial Valley" (and I'm glad I haven't) or "Kirtland Park" but those are recognized places/areas. And if you see Fairfax branding around CC--that's fine as part of the clinic is in fairfax.

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43 minutes ago, Pugu said:

^Exactly! That's how I see it too. (I wouldn't end Midtown in the horizontal middle of Hough! [at 79 St.]). Thanks for this. As they say,  a picture is worth a thousand words.  So it begs the initial question---why would an organization dedicated to Midtown exclude part of it?  Its not an issue of "branding" a place, as it is what it is whether or not the signs say so. I've never seen a sign in life that says "Industrial Valley" (and I'm glad I haven't) or "Kirtland Park" but those are recognized places/areas. And if you see Fairfax branding around CC--that's fine as part of the clinic is in fairfax.

 

There are other community development corporations that oversee beyond E. 79th, such as Fairfax Renaissance. I don’t know all of the CDC boundaries, as they frequently change or merge with others. IE, Northeast Shores (I used to intern here) folded into Collinwood-Nottingham or MetroWest which officially became its own organization after being part of DSDO. CDCs often work on projects together, but I believe that MidTown Incs and MidTown branding ends at E. 79. Fairfax oversees the area between UC and MidTown. So in a true city sense the area would be considered midtown since it’s in the middle between downtown and uptown. However, officially FRDC oversees the bit between E 79 and UC. Burten, Bell, Carr neighbors them to the west, just south of MidTown Inc. See attached from a screenshot of one of their reports: https://fairfaxrenaissance.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Innovation-Square-Neighborhood-Plan-082018-compressed.pdf (its on page 3)

 

 

 

D0BC0833-80B3-4588-855F-5A3F80248F63.png

Edited by imjustinjk

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22 hours ago, imjustinjk said:

That may just be their official service boundaries? I believe that other CDCs operate the rest of MidTown. I've always seen maps define it as between E. 79th and the Innerbelt, but it does make sense that it would run the entire length of Downtown and "Uptown" [UC]. Generally seen as North of Cedar and South of Carnegie, except I guess in AsiaTown area it goes a bit up to Payne as well. However, around Cleveland Clinic you see Fairfax branding and placemaking, not MidTown? I can't recall any branding for MidTown over there off the top of my head. There's also an overarching Health-Tech Corridor that includes parts of Downtown, Midtown, and UC. 

 

The official neighborhood map/SPA map, I think needs to be updated. According the the official map Downtown doesn't extend to the Innerbelt, north and south of CSU. I've always thought it was fully bounded by the Innerbelt, although some weirdos say it stops past the central CBD. I also never hear anyone refer to AsiaTown as Goodrich-Kirtland? Also, I've never heard of Jefferson, nor did many people I spoke to when I was working over there for a class project. Maybe MidTown could become an official neighborhood, but that might step on the toes of some people. 

 

spacer.png

 

342698229_ScreenShot2019-06-07at3_53_24PM.thumb.png.cd389f7ba8e617e5d7c6250972d0eb35.png

 

Here's my amazing graphical skills depicting rough boundaries of MidTown, lol.

 

These are neighborhood ward boundaries, but that doesn't mean that sub neighborhoods or districts do not cross lines.  For example "Shaker Square, "Larchmere" and "Old Buckeye" / "Little Hungary" are sub neighborhoods in the Shaker Buckeye neighborhood.  Downtown and Ohio City also have various neighborhoods.

 

Midtown crosses various wards.

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On 6/7/2019 at 12:58 PM, imjustinjk said:

 

I'm on the fence. On one hand, I acknowledge that historic sites and green space are both very important to cities. However, its an empty lot. What are their plans? Can it not be an urban farm, a garden, an actual park... something to benefit the community other than an empty lot?

I wonder if CF was attracted to Cleveland's oldest property because they are the first (oldest) community foundation in  the  world (according to wiki)... I kind of historical kinship if you will. I can think of no other rational when there are so many undeveloped alternative sites (that are just as unruly if not  more btw) in the area. To single out this plot for that reason seems nonsensical to me. If this was the last remaining underutilized plot i would understand much more. 

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1 hour ago, MyTwoSense said:

 

These are neighborhood ward boundaries, but that doesn't mean that sub neighborhoods or districts do not cross lines.  For example "Shaker Square, "Larchmere" and "Old Buckeye" / "Little Hungary" are sub neighborhoods in the Shaker Buckeye neighborhood.  Downtown and Ohio City also have various neighborhoods.

 

Midtown crosses various wards.

Yes true, but MidTown branding, operations, etc stops at E 79 where the CDC ends. FRDC picks up after this. I’ve always associated the Clinic with Fairfax more than midtown. Even though Fairfax is within a broader midtown area in an urban definition, which is probably more important here than organizational boundaries. Neither are incorrect. One could say they live in Midtown or Chelsea (referencing New York).

 

1 hour ago, shack said:

I wonder if CF was attracted to Cleveland's oldest property because they are the first (oldest) community foundation in  the  world (according to wiki)... I kind of historical kinship if you will. I can think of no other rational when there are so many undeveloped alternative sites (that are just as unruly if not  more btw) in the area. To single out this plot for that reason seems nonsensical to me. If this was the last remaining underutilized plot i would understand much more. 

 

This makes a lot of sense from a historical sense. It could also have been an important fundraising opportunity for Dunham. They can’t really have a large pool of resources can they? Their visitorship is only a few thousand a year. I’m not sure if they even have the resources to properly landscape the lot. They had to do a lot of fundraising to even acquire the lot in the first place. CF has an endowment in the billions. I don’t entirely understand the opposition. If it were a huge multinational firm maybe, but it’s a revered local establishment who wouldn’t do something distasteful to tarnish Dunham Tavern. 

Edited by imjustinjk

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1 minute ago, imjustinjk said:

Yes true, but MidTown branding, operations, etc stops at E 79 where the CDC ends. FRDC picks up after this. I’ve always associated the Clinic with Fairfax more than midtown. Even though Fairfax is within a broader midtown area in an urban definition, which is probably more important here than organizational boundaries. Neither are incorrect. One could say they live in Midtown or Chelsea (referencing New York).

 

nobody in NYC would say MidTown and Chelsea are the same neighborhood.  They aren't.  Those are two separate neighborhoods, however, many neighborhoods are within the same Community Board.  The community board is similar to Cleveland's wards.  Hell's kitchen, along with it's Clinton Neighborhood, the Midtown Gayborhood and Chelsea with newly created, Hudson Yards, the Chelsea Gayborhood along with the Flower, Garment & Meatpacking districts are ALL apart of one Community Board.

 

The majority of Cleveland Clinic is located in Fairfax with some portions in Hough.

 

Does any of this matter, the branding and City Council legislative partnerships and overlay borders of Midtown Cleveland mean more potential connections and development with the district and adjoining neighborhoods.

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