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Cleveland: Midtown: Development and News

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Hopefully, it'll mean that we can start to talk seriously about building on those parking lots on the north side of Detroit... the sad side of the gateway to the West Side!  Based on what we've seen on the other end of the W. 25th Street business corridor, old buildings of that size have a nice little niche market for office and residential tenants.  With the other projects in the works on that stretch, it seems like a no brainer. 

 

I'll hold judgment on the building's desing on Euclid Avenue until after I've seen it.  If it's adhering to the new zoning overlay, they'll have to have activity on the sidewalk frontage and parking in the rear.

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Silver Line’s impact taking shape

As first stops near completion, construction deals rise right along with property values

 

“We wouldn’t be doing this if the Euclid Corridor project were not being done,” said Scott Garson, a principal in Victory Lofts LLC, which will bring 102 loft apartments to the Victory Building at East 70th Street. 

 

By JAY MILLER

 

4:30 am, August 6, 2007

 

With the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority’s Silver Line bus-rapid transit little more than a year from its first paying run, the expectation that the new line would stimulate economic development slowly is becoming a reality.

 

No boulevard in Northeast Ohio is currently in as deep despair as Euclid Avenue. But with the road construction beginning to show signs of new transit stops, “people have a visual clue as to what Euclid Avenue will be,” said Joseph Marinucci, president and CEO of the Downtown Cleveland Alliance.

 

This is especially the case in Midtown, where new deals and transactions are being made at a steady pace and where property values are rising in anticipation of future development opportunities.

 

A $10 million transformation of a former office building into 102 loft apartments is under way at the Victory Building at East 70th Street, the first new, multi-family residential building along Euclid.

 

Across the street, the Cuyahoga County Community Mental Health Board has plans for a $10 million headquarters building.

 

Local 18 of the International Union of Operating Engineers has bought the parcel at the southwest corner of Euclid and East 36th Street for an expansion of its headquarters that sit on the lot behind on Prospect Avenue.

 

Both the land purchased by the operating engineers and a second parcel a block away have changed hands at above-market prices.

 

With this activity, the redevelopment of upper Euclid is beginning to meet the economic development goals of the civic leaders who championed the $200 million bus-rapid transit line along the city’s main thoroughfare.

 

This kind of transit-oriented development is part of what RTA touted when it pushed local and federal officials to fund the Silver Line project. The concept is built on the notion that there is a desire among some people to live and work in a neighborhood that harks back to the time before cars were so ubiquitous, when people sought to live and businesses sought to cluster around bus and streetcar stops.

 

 

Moving down the line

 

Midtown took particular notice of the coming of the line and in 2004 began pushing, successfully, for a new zoning code for the area that encourages development around the Silver Line stations.

 

James Haviland, executive director of MidTown Cleveland Inc., a community development organization, said his group’s neighborhood master plan and the new zoning code approved more than a year ago by the city of Cleveland gives developers some sense of how the corridor will look in the years ahead. It favors residential development and buildings with a higher density — of three stories or more clustered around the transit stops. The new zoning, for example, won’t allow single-story fast food restaurants or used car lots to expand their grip on Euclid in Midtown.

 

Indeed, some of the current development interest focuses around stops on the RTA’s Silver Line. Both the mental health board building and the Victory lofts are a few steps away from a transit stop at East 71st Street.

 

Scott Garson, a principal in Victory Lofts LLC and a real estate broker with NAI Daus, said the $10 million Victory Lofts will be carved out of a four-story former office building that he and his development partners purchased in December 2005 for $2.1 million.

 

Mr. Garson believes the lofts will be attractive to University Circle-area students and workers who want to avoid that congested area’s traffic and parking problems.

 

The units all run about 1,000 square feet in a single open space, save for the kitchen and bathroom.

 

“We wouldn’t be doing this if the Euclid Corridor project were not being done,” Mr. Garson said. “There is a (transit) stop right in front of the building.”

 

The Cuyahoga County Community Mental Health Board has plans to build a new headquarters building on a now-vacant piece of land on the north side of Euclid Avenue between East 69th and East 79th streets. The board will decide, perhaps as soon as this week, whether to go ahead with the project.

 

The three-story headquarters will cost about $10 million, said board chief executive officer William Denihan, and bring 75 employees, including those of related organizations including NAMI of Greater Cleveland, an advocacy organization for the mentally ill affiliated with the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and the Cuyahoga Tapestry System of Care, an organization that serves children with serious emotional needs. The two organizations currently lease space from the mental health board.

 

Farther west on Euclid, the operating engineers union in March of this year paid $1.3 million for the land at 3600 Euclid for its headquarters expansion. Business manager Patrick Sink did not return four calls made to talk about the expansion plans.

 

“We’re seeing an increase in real estate values and an increase in serious interest by investors who have an interest in making an investment,” Mr. Haviland said.

 

Another property, the Stockbridge Apartments at 3328 Euclid changed hands in January for $2.3 million. The property, purchased by the Sandlow Family Trust of Los Angeles, had a market value of $871,800, according to county tax records.

 

 

On pace for progress

 

In addition, two projects begun last year are moving to fruition.

 

Developer Richard Pace is completing the renovation of the former Baker Motor Car Co. building at 7100 Euclid into an office building for small technology-oriented businesses and Heartland Developers Inc., and the Cowden Humphrey Co. law firm are renovating a 50,000-square-foot office building at 4600 Euclid for use by the law firm and other tenants.

 

RTA also is doing what it can. It is offering two properties it owns in Midtown — at 4601 Euclid and 6611 Euclid — for sale for future development. A spokesman said neither of these properties has yet been sold.

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Great news. 

 

I took a few seconds to make a snapshot and point out where it looks like these developments will happen.  Please correct me if I'm wrong.  EDIT:  Updated the Victory Lofts marker.

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The concept is built on the notion that there is a desire among some people to live and work in a neighborhood that harks back to the time before cars were so ubiquitous, when people sought to live and businesses sought to cluster around bus and streetcar stops.

 

Ugh. I know I whine about the PD all the time, but this was a particularly dense observation, IMHO. Transit-oriented development and mixed use are not some throwback to 1950s America ... they are and have been leading indicators of vibrant neighborhoods in urban areas nationwide. Even within Northeast Ohio, where we have often dropped the ball in terms of urban density, neighborhoods like the Gold Coast, Shaker Square, Cedar Lee, Coventry, the Warehouse District, E. 4th St., Little Italy, etc. highlight that transit proximity and mixed-use density are preferred by LOTS of people. I hate our newspaper  :x

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The concept is built on the notion that there is a desire among some people to live and work in a neighborhood that harks back to the time before cars were so ubiquitous, when people sought to live and businesses sought to cluster around bus and streetcar stops.

 

Sometimes I'd like to think we (Greater Clevelanders) say stuff like that to make ourselves feel good that we're really not behind the times and falling farther behind virtually every progressive, dynamic metro area in the U.S. and world. In reality, it's just sheer ignorance and reveals that some people just don't travel very much. And if they do travel, they must be doing it with their eyes closed.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Yeah. Not to go off on a PD rant, but I'm so sick of the international section not having so much INTERNATIONAL news. I mean, it's a big world we live in. Why not give us news outside of Cleveland/Ohio?? How much do you think it would cost to start up a new newspaper that actually covers the news objectively and with some intelligent, articulate writing that isn't meant to cater to a friggin 3 year old? Seriously. I'm wondering.

 

Even though NYC drives me crazy, I will never be able to replace the NY Times. I wish Cleveland had a paper more like that.

 

Okay. Off-topic rant done.

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Yeah. Not to go off on a PD rant, but I'm so sick of the international section not having so much INTERNATIONAL news. I mean, it's a big world we live in. Why not give us news outside of Cleveland/Ohio?? How much do you think it would cost to start up a new newspaper that actually covers the news objectively and with some intelligent, articulate writing that isn't meant to cater to a friggin 3 year old? Seriously. I'm wondering.

 

Even though NYC drives me crazy, I will never be able to replace the NY Times. I wish Cleveland had a paper more like that.

 

Okay. Off-topic rant done.

 

Boogie Down...inhale......no slowly blow it out!  LOL

 

Valid points.  Have you fired off an email, fax or letter to the PD that expresses your frustration?

 

I'm sure that a well written letter will make you feel better.

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Pope that was condescending. 

 

No, but I think writing a letter does more good than saying nothing at all.

 

It might encourage others to join a cause or do something positive.

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I agree. I'd rather write a letter than say nothing and not allow my voice to be heard.

 

Let's get back to the issue.

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I would write to the paper's "Reader's Representative".  It seems like that is what he is there for.

 

Frqntflyr, I think that the Victory Lofts are going to be in the building next door to the one you marked.  That is a four story building, as they indicate in the article.  The one you marked is only two.

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Frqntflyr, I think that the Victory Lofts are going to be in the building next door to the one you marked.  That is a four story building, as they indicate in the article.  The one you marked is only two.

 

Thanks, it's updated now.

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William Denihan fails to win support for new mental health board building

Wednesday, August 15, 2007

Harlan Spector

Plain Dealer Reporter

 

Nobody can accuse William Denihan of lacking ambition....

 

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Jesus, $480,000 a month?  22 months out of that place and you have the $10,000,000 for the new building.  Doesn't make much sense to me, but it is Cuyahoga County.

Wonder if this has any affect on the United Trust Building rehab.

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Why would it? The Cuyahoga County mental health board is at Detroit and West 25th. The United Bank Building is at Lorain and West 25th.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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$480,000 per month?????????? That has to be a misprint.

 

Very definitely a misprint.  That kind of money can get you 50,000 sf in the very best midtown Manhattan buildings.

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I read a little while ago that the city designated an area of Midtown "The Art Quarter". I was just wondering if anyone has heard any new developments in line with this designation? Or is this only a name change on paper so far?

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I read a little while ago that the city designated an area of Midtown "The Art Quarter". I was just wondering if anyone has heard any new developments in line with this designation? Or is this only a name change on paper so far?

 

The district of design.  If you do a search you'll see a thread.

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Group gets a handle on art haunts

Renaming area underscores trend

Monday, April 16, 2007

Jesse Tinsley

Plain Dealer Reporter

 

A Cleveland neighborhood is gradually becoming an art district - one of those funky, vibrant enclaves of artists' studios, galleries, bistros and live-work spaces that are spreading all over the country....

 

 

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I don't know if this should really go here or not..

 

LINK TO ARTICLE

 

Solon biotech firm headed to Midtown

 

By CHUCK SODER

 

4:30 am, August 20, 2007

 

Biotechnology company Analiza Inc. will move to Midtown Cleveland from Solon in October.

 

The company, which analyzes potential drugs for pharmaceutical companies, signed a lease to take 6,000 square feet in the Tyler Elevator Building, said Mark Stratton, vice president of marketing and business development. The extra 2,500 square feet will allow Analiza to add a few people to its staff of about 12, he said.

 

Its cancer diagnostics subsidiary, AnalizaDx LLC, will move with it. The unit analyzes the structure of proteins in bodily fluids to diagnose cancer.

 

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Not sure if this was posted elsewhere, but this sounds pretty cool:

 

Victory Building on Euclid Corridor to be converted to lofts, shops

Saturday, September 22, 2007

Alison Grant

Plain Dealer Reporter

 

The Euclid Corridor Project has spawned its first residential development in the Midtown neighborhood -- a loft conversion of a warehouse and office property at East 71st Street and Euclid Avenue...

 

 

agrant@plaind.com, 216-999-4758

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Cool, can't wait for these to open. It may still be too early to celebrate, but looks like the ECP is sparking the new development that was promised.

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And it's drawing investment from other cities -- note that two of partners are from LA and NYC.


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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Cleveland Free Times

Volume 15, Issue 29

Published November 21st, 2007

Arts News

 

Cleveland is an old-school manufacturing town. What we know how to do is take raw materials and make something out of them, a fact that continually resurfaces as neighborhoods are reborn - not just in the old warehouse and factory space we find new ways to use, but even sometimes in the ways we find to use it.

 

The much collected artist Tom Balbo recently announced the establishment of the Morgan Art of Papermaking Conservatory and Education Foundation, which will be known as the Morgan Conservatory, for short. A graduate of Baldwin-Wallace College and Syracuse University, Balbo began his career as a potter and print-maker - media he continues to pursue - but over the last 25 years his interests have increasingly turned toward paper-making, casting and paper-based sculpture. He's worked mostly in Cleveland and maintains a gallery on Hough Avenue. He's in the process of equipping and moving into the space that will be the Morgan Conservatory, a former machine shop with 15,000 square feet of industrial space at 1754 E. 47th St., between Commerce and Payne.

 

When it's all up and running, the new organization will have three directions of programming: a kind of apprenticeship program that teaches and certifies people in the making of paper; an art lab, which Balbo says will bring artists of various disciplines to work in residency to make paper-based work, which could be anything from sculpture to cast paper to print-making; and a book arts program, which will bring master book-makers and printers to teach a range of skills and techniques involved in the hand-making of books, from binding structures to printing with letter press machines. The organization will also distribute fine, handmade papers. A small gallery will show the paper-making process, examples of papers and the work of artists.

 

In addition to parking, there's space on location where Balbo plans to grow kozo, a plant whose fiber is used to make one of the many Japanese styles known as "rice" paper.

 

The Morgan Conservatory plans to operate in conjunction with nearby printmaking cooperative Zygote Press, which should make the neighborhood even more noteworthy as a destination for printmakers and other artists. Details of the relationship are not yet worked out, but the two organizations plan to work together on visiting artist programs, as well as gallery shows and openings.

 

Balbo says the Morgan Conservatory established its 501 © (3) nonprofit status in August and is now raising funds. The space is under renovation, but he's planning a short workshop to take place in January, and hopes to have a residency program underway by summer 2008.

 

http://www.balbogalleries.com/

 

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They overlap. If I recall correctly, The QuARTer stretches from Payne to St. Clair between E. 17th and E. 40th. The design district, I believe runs from E. 9th (or maybe E. 12th) to E. 36th and from Euclid to the lake. I could be a little off on these boundaries, but I believe the main gap is that the District of Design doesn't cover the live-work stretch along E. 40th between Superior and Chester and possibly not all of Tyler Village.

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For one thing, neither the QuARTer effort nor the District of Design are based primarily in Midtown. The QuARTer isn't in Midtown at all ... it's inside the downtown Quadrangle district and the St. Clair Superior service area. The District of Design is largely in the downtown Theater, Financial, Civic and Quadrangle districts and the St. Clair Superior Service area, with a relatively small sliver (about E. 26th to E. 36th between Euclid and Payne) in Midtown.

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Why can't they just call it Midtown to make it easy on everyone?

 

I agree. In my opinion, everything between Downtown and University Circle should be Midtown and it should be governed by a single CDC.

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Technically, the Quadrangle is not a CDC but more of a Chamber of Commerce type organization for businesses in that area. Not entirely - but mostly.

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^To me, Fairfax is just the residential area south of the Clinic and doesn't cover anywhere west of 55th or north of Carnegie [yes, I know technically the Clinic is in Fairfax].

 

Yeah, the naming thing is out of control- I think we need to start over.

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nice article guv. cool news. the morgan conservatory is a type of niche arts organization that could really be a big part of making midtown's nut. i am thinking of the cma's painting restoration project too. these specialties will bring in creative people from all over the world.

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^So true.  And also the ICA (intermuseum conservation association) which serves little museums all over the midwest- that means two full time professional conservancy staffs within the city.

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VIA : http://techczar.blog.com/2538397/

 

One of the more amazing transformations of a building that I was privy to during my time as “Tech Czar,” was the Baker Electric Building (also known as the Carpenter Press Building) located on Euclid Avenue and E. 71st.  The building was designed by Frank B. Meade and built in 1910 for the Baker Electric Motor Car (quick note – Cleveland was a leader in electric car technology nearly a hundred years ago). Baker Electric was founded and operated by Walter C. Baker a tech pioneer and memorable entrepreneur. The building was used as car showroom. Over the years at has been the site of many companies most notably as the home of Carpenter Press.

 

A real estate partnership including Cumberland Development, New Era Builders and Ariel Ventures bought the building in June of 2006. The new owners understood that there was a shortage of incubator and post-incubator space for technology based companies. (Quick side note – I was trying to get the City of Cleveland to buy Carpenter Press Building at the same the new owners were reviewing the sight. I wanted to create a biotech incubator and R&D facility.) The new owners immediately began the renovation of the 52,000 square foot facility. It was totally gutted, a new parking lot was put in, back-up power and the original car showroom has been brought back to as original state as it can be. The goal was to create an environment to develop over a 100 new tech jobs in the Midtown corridor.

 

Current tenants now include:

 

·        Bunge BIPHOR – an innovator of pigments and coatings

·        Volcano Corporation – a company that develops intravascular ultrasound technology

·        Diagnostic Hybrids – an R&D company that specializes in molecular diagnostic kits

·        iNetworks – a Pittsburgh-based venture capital group

·        Cumberland Development – owner and real estate development company

 

There is only 20,000 square feet available in the building and it is estimated that it will be fully-occupied by the end of summer. The project cost almost $7.1 million and was supported New Markets Tax Credits and $1.0 million from the County’s Brownfield Redevelopment Fund. Unfortunately, no City participation. The building is now listed on the National Register for Historic Places and was redeveloped utilizing green and sustainable design practices and will receive a LEED Silver Certification.

 

This building’s proximity to University Circle (and especially the Cleveland Clinic) and Downtown will make this a very attractive building for new tech companies. Of course, having a venture capital group on site is always a provocative development. I have always been proud of this development, especially given its Midtown location.  Of course, more development is necessary in the Midtown area but my sources in the real estate area are detailing to me that there is significant real estate speculation in the Midtown area. This could be a fantastic corridor (now with the RTA Silver Line nearing completion) for tech and biotech. Stay tuned for new developments and congrats to all those involved in the Baker Electric Building.

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Does anyone know the story with the ratty old vacant supermarket building on Euclid Ave. in front of the Playhouse parking lot?  County Auditor site says its owned (and has been owned for a long time) by Si Harb.  That thing ain't pretty.  I believe it's the last conspicuous piece of blight between E79th and University Circle (putting aside the fast food places.  And the new suburban drug store at 79th.  And the Clinic.  And all the poorly sited non-profits across from the Clinic.)

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I forgot the name, but there was supposed to be a building near Euclid and E. 30th that was going to be re-habbed from office to apartment. It is on of the bigger buildings in that part of MidTown.. it was announced last year and then nothing was ever spoke of it again. Updates? Scrapped idea? It wasn't listed as a project in the PD's fabulous Euclid article on Sunday either.

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