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Cleveland: Midtown: Development and News

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Hts121, I understand your point... but if the city, through a CDC, put all its weight behind plans to build a suburban industrial park in the WHD, how many Stark-type proposals do you think we'd see?  Midtown planning hasn't been an open issue for almost 10 years.  It isnt surprising to me that the amount of support this all-biotech plan has gotten would dissuade competing proposals to the extent that none would see the light of day.  Substantial headwinds are in place, not at the market or demand level, but at the government level.  This was all a done deal before the transit project even broke ground.  Not similar in that sense to WHD. 

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Agreed to an extent and I don't want you to think that I wouldn't be ecstaticif you Utopian MidTown became a reality.  But you also forget that the City incentivized residential development in MidTown for years, going back to the early 1990s.  That's how we have the (relatively) new build we have there now.  Those efforts were met with luke warm success, if that, and did not lead to any significant spin-off development that was hoped for.  15 years later, we still have new residential surrounded by delapidated housing.  I think the City leaders have resolved that vibrant mixed use communities don't just pop out of the ground, and this is especially true in Cleveland's core.  Rather, they evolve over time to meet market demands of neighborhoods that, for one reason or another, have some momentum already built up.  I am not trying to dash your dreams, but instead just recommending some patience.  Considering the state of MidTown whn the corridor started, I don't see how anyone could expect anything more than slow and steady progress.  Nothing that is being built there now cannot be replaced if market demands change

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I doubt any of us have widely variant dreams for Midtown.  I just tend to believe that adding white collar/hi education employment to Midtown makes it a more viable location for market rate housing down the line.  And 327, if it makes you happier, you could think of this news about the Agora in glass half-full terms: rental income from the office space will cross subsidize survival of the performance venue.  Not sure what it's future would have been otherwise.  Demolition?  Fly by night Church?

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All I can say is that vibrant mixed use communities don't tend to sprout within suburban industrial parks either.  It's easier to build neighborhoods on vacant lots than it is to build them on top of brand new warehouses.  The state of Midtown when the corridor started is that planning along the corridor was largely already complete, and I think that was a mistake.  One would think that the healthline project might have opened possibilities that weren't available in the 90s.  But the expedient planning of this industrial park didn't leave much opening for any of them.  If there was a time for patience, maybe that was during the planning phase.

 

And yes, there is certianly a glass half full aspect to the Agora transfer.  But it also gives us a chance to (re)consider what might be done in that vicinity.  I think that's a conversation the community needs to have. 

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I'm sure the Agora can coexist in the neighborhood with offices since there are not all that many events there.  Hank Loconti will continue to book events there, but the competition with House of Blues and other venues will continue (so far their has been no mention of a casino venue THANK HEAVENS!).  So let's hope Midtown can creatively subsidize the rennovation and fill the schedule with non-traditional events.  If office developments spring up they should help support some dining establishments during the day, and perhaps those same eateries could open on event nights.

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Well it will already be getting a new restaurant this spring since Umami Moto has their prep kitchen in the old Agora restaurant kitchen and plan to open a restaurant in the space.

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I doubt any of us have widely variant dreams for Midtown.  I just tend to believe that adding white collar/hi education employment to Midtown makes it a more viable location for market rate housing down the line. 

 

We think alike (take that however you want to ;))

 

It's easier to build neighborhoods on vacant lots than it is to build them on top of brand new warehouses. 

 

How many brand new warehouses are there in MidTown.  It is a pretty extensive tract of land and is still has PLENTY of vacant lots.  Besides, what is the last neighborhood of any value any developer built here (or anywhere) on top of empty lots surrounded by empty lots?  Where is the precedent?

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Cleveland has a ton of neighborhoods and all should not be the same. I don't have a problem with Midtown being the city's "suburban business park" district. I believe that every neighborhood in the city should have its own characteristics. I think Midtown's current path makes us competitive with the suburbs in this area. I'm okay with that. We have plenty of neighborhoods in the city that could use the types of development that we all love. But if Midtown is going to be the "suburban Downtown" of the city, let it. Fine with me. As long as it works, I'm okay with that. We need at least one neighborhood that can offer surburban style business developments so that we stay competitive. I'm just glad to see that the Agora will remain open, and I also hope that they leave the sign on 24/7 dammit!  :lol:

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^^Yeah, but I'm the one who said "hi education," so you might want to distance yourself.

 

I don't really get the new warehouse thing either.  327, are you referring to something specific?  I think there were some additions to the Pierre's Ice Cream and adjacent sugar facility, but otherwise, the only new non-residential construction thus far is the midtown tech park, no?  It's not much to look at, but it's not a warehouse and should have decent worker density.  I don't think any warehouses are in planning stages either.  Most of the projects being planned now are rehabs of existing zero setback buildings that have languished vacant for years or even decades.  Anything that fills that hulking thing on Carnegie is great for the neighborhood, IMHO, and only increases the probability of new housing someday. 

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Per the official CDC plan, additional structures like the Tech Park are desired.  It's not functionally a warehouse but it looks like a modern one and its effect on the street is similar to one.  I'm not sure worker density means a whole lot.  If it did, the Clinic's surroundings would look much different.  Same goes for Third Federal.  These examples demonstrate that workers do not equate to feet on the street or money spent nearby.  Workers don't even equate to nearby residential demand, although it doesn't hurt.

 

I think inlovewithCLE makes a great point about the city competing with its suburbs for jobs, and it needs whatever modern buildings are necessary to that end.  But needing them in general doesn't mean we need them on Euclid Avenue.  When it comes to new residents, Cleveland isn't really competing with Beachwood so much as it's competing with Milwaukee and Boston and so forth.  Cleveland cannot offer a competitive suburban living experience.  Ever.  Its only hope is to compete as a major city, with other major cities, for residents who desire to live in such an environment.  Having jobs for them is a big help, sure.  But is it necessary to put those jobs right on Main Street, when our competitors are able to offer similar workplaces AND a Main Street people might want to visit?  Can we afford to have a pedestrian dead-zone of this length right through the middle of town?

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  But is it necessary to put those jobs right on Main Street, when our competitors are able to offer similar workplaces AND a Main Street people might want to visit?  Can we afford to have a pedestrian dead-zone of this length right through the middle of town?

 

Not to mention how asinine it is to promote suburban style development right along the new BRT. 

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^I'm sure we all agree that the city and Midtown should be promoting quality design best they can.  As far as I know, there are no proposals or planning guidelines calling for single story buildings with big setbacks or street-side surface parking.  By "suburban warehouse" I think 327 just means office and lab space without [currently unmarketable] retail space built into the ground floor.

 

327, you think channeling deep public subsidy into new housing that's spatially disconnected from our existing activity centers would be an effective way to offer a lifestyle product competitive with other cities?  Personally, for the near and medium term, I think UC, Ohio City, Downtown and Tremont (etc.) are far better prospects for providing competitive urban residential choices, especially if there are good job opportunities in easy transit, biking and driving distance.  I could be wrong, but I'd bet that most people here would prefer to live downtown or UC with a HealthLine commute to East 55th and Euclid rather than in a new four story residential building next to the Agora.  And at the same time, Midtown seems to offer a great opportunity to seed a competitive cluster of businesses, which, given the theory behind industry clusters, can't just be "put" anywhere.

 

I think fundamentally we have very different models of urban development in our heads.  I guess it's pessimistic of me, but my model contemplates a pretty finite population of yuppies and students interesting in Cleveland's urban living at the moment and a finite number of subsidy dollars.  Based on that, I have a strong preference for trying to build critical mass by focusing on areas that already have some action (e.g., downtown and UC for housing, Midtown for tech) so we can generate some actual market demand to leverage .  I think that's the only realistic way of really offering a lifestyle product competitive with other cities, which, assuming people like urban retail, we're struggling to do with even in our best neighborhoods, let alone barren frontiers.  I also think building critical mass will grow this population faster than spreading our subsidy and finite yuppie population over a wider geographic area.  If I'm way off, I'm pretty sure the zoning permits residential development in much of midtown.

 

So yeah, I think it would be swell to have Midtown emerge as a vital mixed use neighborhood, and I hope it does, but given the limits of our market, I think developing a growing employment cluster well served by transit, between two areas already showing promising residential growth, should be a higher priority at the moment.

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Correct me if I'm wrong Strap, but it sounds like you're suggesting that Downtown and Uptown be viewed as bedroom communities for Midtown.  I think that approach ignores the essential nature of each piece and how they fit together.  And University Circle has a very finite capacity for adding anything, particularly with the height restrictions that always seem to emerge there. 

 

The other hot neighborhoods you mention aren't exactly brimming with open land.  They're popular because they're relatively intact so a bit of rehab was all they needed.  Those neighborhoods will continue to gentrify, but that may reduce their overall populations.  It will certainly moderate any gains from infill.  The recent census indicates that this pattern isn't conducive to growth.  Lots of housing units were added in the past decade, yet the city's population not only shrank but got older.  At some point we have to shift into the next gear.     

 

I've always found your tag quote about the grapes to be intriguing and perceptive, and I think it points out Cleveland's fundamental problem.  Since 1932 many of the grapes have shriveled, and those remaining are scattered throughout far too much vine.  We can't be grapes anymore.  Frankly that never worked... it set the table for the collapse of the 60s.  My grape, your grape, red grape, green grape.  The ties that bind stopped binding and everything fell apart.

 

Instead, we need to view the city as an integrated whole.  Each part is significant not only unto itself but in relation to those around it, in relation to the core, and in relation to the entirety.  That means downtown needs to be downtown, to serve all the purposes that a downtown is meant to serve and has always served in functional cities.  It can't just be a neighborhood. 

 

Similarly, Main Street has to be Main Street, including everything denoted by that concept.  It can't just be a workplace, even if it's THE workplace.  It needs to form a living connective tissue between downtown and uptown.  To accomplish that, it needs to be welcoming and inviting.  It can't be cold, impersonal, institutional.  It can't be lined with places that obviously require an ID card to get in.  It can't just be for those who happen to have jobs there.  It has to be for everyone. 

 

Without a functional downtown and a functional main street, there's a low ceiling on what we can accomplish by focusing on individual nuggets here and there.  Something has to tie them together into one great city.  That's what downtowns and main streets are for.

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Cleveland has a ton of neighborhoods and all should not be the same. I don't have a problem with Midtown being the city's "suburban business park" district. I believe that every neighborhood in the city should have its own characteristics. I think Midtown's current path makes us competitive with the suburbs in this area. I'm okay with that. We have plenty of neighborhoods in the city that could use the types of development that we all love. But if Midtown is going to be the "suburban Downtown" of the city, let it. Fine with me. As long as it works, I'm okay with that. We need at least one neighborhood that can offer surburban style business developments so that we stay competitive. I'm just glad to see that the Agora will remain open, and I also hope that they leave the sign on 24/7 dammit!  :lol:

 

We do already have at 2 suburban parks comprised solely of light industrial and business uses that you describe: Hinckley Parkway http://www.loopnet.com/Listing/16806035/Hinckley-Industrial-Parkway-Schaaf-Road-Cleveland-OH/ and Johnson Parkway (http://www.loopnet.com/Listing/16281538/Johnston-Parkway-Garfield-Heights-OH/ - although that building is in garfield heights, north of NEO parkway in the map is Cleveland). I live near the Hinckley Parkway, and anecdotally, there's several existing properties there for sale with that vacant land in the link [FWIW, that land has been for sale for 15+ years, next to a hillside]. (I'll concede that unfortunately, developers and prospective tenants may or may not want the new construction that Euclid Ave provides.)

 

Regardless of that, the BRT was designed to compliment Euclid Ave's density with multiple mixed-use areas.

 

Straphanger, there's at least one new devel there on Euclid that has surface parking (behind the building) I recall; although I have to run now to the city planning commish meeting.

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^I'm going to guess that anything built or redeveloped in midtown in the foreseeable future (other than the Clinic) is going to have surface parking, whether it's residential or commercial.  Welcome to $8/sf, or $10 or $12 or whatever.  I was pointing out that nothing being built or planned is really a "suburban warehouse" as you might find in those traditional suburban industrial parks, so it's a little frustrating hearing that over and over.  Certainly much room for better design, however.

 

327, I just think it comes down our different conceptual models of city.  I think the pie needs to grow bigger before it's going to sustainably spread over more linear miles of Euclid.  Maybe it never will.  In any case, I put much less stock than you in the powers of master plans to dictate what's going to go where.  If market rate residential developers want to attack midtown, and I'm sure some will at some point, the city will listen and answer with subsidies.  There are no big suburban warehouses scaring residential developers away, and no plans for noxious industrial uses.  All the vacant land isn't going to disappear in the next 5 or even 10 years.

 

And really, I'm not sure I understand the alternative.  What specifically are you suggesting?  That the city leans on the Locontis totell Midtown to take a hike, letting the Agora fall into tax foreclosure while we hope a decently capitalized rock and roll neighborhood proposal emerges before the building is too far gone?  Have RTA take a bigger loss (and cut some bus routes) by demolishing its empty shell and selling the land to Dunham?  Maybe shift some subsidy away from a future phase of Uptown to instead put 50 residential units in that empty shell?  Withhold grant money from Hemmingway so that hulking thing at Carnegie and 55th can continue to disintegrate?  Maybe you just want the muckety mucks to stop promoting Midtown as a tech destination to slow the "rapid" pace of redevelopment there, I don't know.  I just don't see how any of that promotes anyone's vision of Midtown unless you are very confident that a new urban residential boom the likes we haven't had in 70+ years is right around the corner.  I grant you that filling midtown with a tech cluster does not guaranty a vital neighborhood there, but I just don't see any viable alternative that gets us closer (let alone all the benefits that a tech cluster there has for the city's other areas).

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Get out of my head, Strap! (v2.0)


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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I would have gone with ELO, but that's just me. 

 

Strap, I've already said what I'd do differently.  It's simple-- develop a plan that's better suited for Euclid Avenue's future, rather than its unfortunate present.  Would that change anything?  Perhaps nothing at all.  But at least at that point we're trying.  Makes no sense to spend so much on the Corridor project then say "Awww, screw it.  Can't build nothin good here.  Let's just throw up low rent floorspace in bulk."

 

I haven't said that any of the rehabs shouldn't proceed.  The biggest one's not even on Euclid and has little to do with my Main Street argument.  I did say that the Victory Building rehab should not be strictly office space.  I even said that the subsidies it's receiving should be premised on the project including residential, since that would better leverage the massive public investment adjacent to it.  That way the state wouldn't be spending quite so much on a development that contributes nothing to street life after 5pm.  Also if we're going to promote some road as a tech center, might I suggest Chester as opposed to Euclid.  It's a block away, it's auto-oriented... it's not Main Street and it didn't just receive a huge transit investment that promised density and mixed use.  All I'm really suggesting is a unified plan.

 

To me that makes 9x more sense than what's being done.  If that makes me crazy, then go ahead and lock me away in a mental hospital right on Main Street.  Wait... on second thought, don't build it there.

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Fair enough.  You would amend the the master plan and condition some of the grant to the Victor building on including a residential component.  I don't think you're crazy at all, I just don't think your approach is going to get you a thriving mixed use neighborhood any faster.  And conditioning grants like that does risk stifling some of the nascent tech corridor development, which at this point mostly consists of rehabbing old buildings (of which there are literally none on Chester east of 55th).

 

In any case, I think Hts is right, nothing is being crowded out here at all.  The market will evolve and developers will come up with new ideas as it does.  You think the giant Casino garage was in Gateway's master plan?  I think the best thing we can do is enforce some basic design guidelines, which the zoning already encompasses.  I would have been really psyched if the Midtown Tech Park or whatever it's called had at least one little coffee shop opening onto Euclid to break up that bland facade, but really, that thing is not scaring away any residential development.  I think you might be worrying too much about some kind of hypothetical "suburban warehouse" development that seems unlikely every to be proposed.

 

By the way, 327, I don't know if it would make you feel better, but there are at least some urban tech areas evolving into very decent mixed use areas.  The uses aren't remotely incompatible.

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We all agree that the public has little control over what private developers do.  My suggestions are targeted at public entities.  As to how much control CDC's have over city planning and development funds spent in their areas, who really knows.  But I believe it to be considerable.  And I steadfastly believe that pursuing a mixed use neighborhood would create one faster than would pursuing a different goal would.

 

Does it mean nothing that the current strategy is not what we were sold in conjunction with the BRT plan?  Are we really going to equate everything with everything else?  Are we really working toward a lively mixed-use neighborhood by building private single-use workplaces?  Compatible?  Perhaps, in some ways.  Equivalent?  Interchangable?  Not at all.

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I would have been really psyched if the Midtown Tech Park or whatever it's called had at least one little coffee shop opening onto Euclid to break up that bland facade

 

You might have been psyched, but I would pity the owner of that shop whose business would be doomed to fail by putting the cart before the horse.

 

FWIW, I want a developer in this City with money to burn who has 327's 'vision' for the corridor ;)

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But by not building said storefront, all future possibility of it on that site is eliminated.  During the life of the Geis building anyway. 

 

Again, the only expenditures I'm concerned about here are those of the public.  It seems that this CDC is actively pursuing, with public funds, a "vision" quite different than the "vision" the public was being sold when it funded the adjacent BRT project. 

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I think you should build 'said storefront'.  Hell, build 10 of them in the Euclid/55th area.  Someone is obviously missing out on a very lucrative venture.  Banks will jump at the chance to finance you in your edeavors, I'm sure.

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I think you should build 'said storefront'.  Hell, build 10 of them in the Euclid/55th area.  Someone is obviously missing out on a very lucrative venture.  Banks will jump at the chance to finance you in your edeavors, I'm sure.

 

That's just silly.  My whole point is that when this much public money is involved, immediate profitability ceases to be the only issue.  That's one of the reasons the public invests in otherwise private development, to steer things toward a better long term plan that accounts for interests beyond those of each individual developer.  You consistently claim that developers not only answer to no one but somehow have a right to use public funds and assets, keep all the profits, and cede not an ounce of planning control to the public.  I would characterize that position as somewhere between "crony capitalism" and anarchy... which I didn't think was conceptually possible until I read it here.   

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I have?  You would have to quote where I said that.  The most I have ever said is that zoning codes can't deprive private owners of PRESENT economically viable use of the land.  The codes, regulations, whatever can't tell private landowners that they must wait 30 years for some purely speculative long term plan of the City to come to fruition.  I also might have said that it is not sound policy on the part of any City to try to manufacture density when the market of that particular area doesn't demand it.  You used the grape vine analogy which is kind of perfect for Midtown.  I would rather grow the cluster of grapes from each end until they meet in the middle.  And I don't want the sole focus on Euclid Ave.  I don't see the corridor as a 100 ft wide, 3.5 mile strip ripe for development.  I'm looking bigger picture here.  You apparently want to place each grape sporadically along a single vine until the vine eventually fills up.  Same end goal, different approaches.  Each one would take time.  I just think my strategy is not only more beneficial in the short term, and is also a better strategy to nurture the desired end result.

 

Since I know you can't resist, I'll let you get the last word in ;)

 

v nice!  before I even had time to edit

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I was about to post:

 

Question for you guys: did the senior housing proposed for the south side of Euclid Ave b/w 73rd and 74th ever get built?

 

Similarly, Emerald Alliance V, the supportive housing at Euclid and 75th must be pretty close to wrapped up now, no?  What do people think of the finished [more or less] product?

 

But I just noticed that googlemaps seems to have finally added thr 45 degree view to Cleveland, with aerial photos that must be from this past summer!

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Cleveland,+OH&hl=en&ll=41.504629,-81.635102&spn=0.001991,0.00327&sll=41.503736,-81.637656&sspn=0.001991,0.00327&oq=Cleve&vpsrc=6&t=w&hnear=Cleveland,+Cuyahoga,+Ohio&z=19

 

Anyway, what do people think of these two buildings now that they are close to finished?

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The senior housing is under construction, I'm not sure if Emerald Alliance is finished or not.

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I've never seen lights or activity at Emerald. Strange, unless it is not complete.  I can't find any info on it doing a google search except for the plans and Cleveland Planning Comission info.

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Regarding the photo just posted, does anyone know the story regarding the former mansion with large frontal addition to the bottom left? I recall when construction began - probably at least ten years ago. Then it was started again but I don't think anything has happened in the past few years. Much potential. Who owns and what happened?

 

Second, I've heard conflicting stories - that a developer is or has purchased the monstrosity to the west of Dunham Tavern, to totally retrofit it and make it presentable, and also Dunham Tavern is or has raised the funds to purchase and demolish it.  Are either of these scenarios quite certain?

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^I think the latest news about the shell next to Dunham was in this Cleveland.com article from a couple weeks ago, discussed on page 23 of this thread: http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2011/12/post_94.html.  In short, RTA agreed to sell the building to Cumberland (the group that converted the Baker Electric bldg) for $500k, but the Dunham folks are still interested if that deal falls through.  It's not clear when the sale to Cumberland was supposed to close.

 

I've always wondered about that former mansion with the tacked on facade that seemed to be perpetually under construction for years.

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Well I heard on Sunday, from someone very involved with Dunham Tavern, that they are purchasing it and will demolish the hulk.  "Many a slip between cup and lip," however....

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The article seemed pretty clear that Cumberland had purchased it (mentioned sale had been approved by the RTA Board) for $500,000.00.  I find it hard to believe that Dunham has that kind of $$$ to spare (plus the substantial cost for demolition which I would imagine would run 7 figures).

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The article seemed pretty clear that Cumberland had purchased it (mentioned sale had been approved by the RTA Board) for $500,000.00.  I find it hard to believe that Dunham has that kind of $$$ to spare (plus the substantial cost for demolition which I would imagine would run 7 figures).

 

When I bought my house, at what we thought was a good price, the bank came back and told us it wasn't worth near that much and would only give us a loan of a far lower amount.  So we had to renegotiate with the seller.  Maybe something similar happened here.  Cumberland and RTA thought they had a deal, but Cumberland's financing fell through.  Maybe Cumberland couldn't raise enough money to do a rehab.  So RTA is selling it to Dunham, probably for a lot less than $500,000.

 

Who knows.  A lot of "done deals" fall apart before the papers get signed.

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That's more what I'm thinking. Could be a wealthy benefactor or benefactors of Dunham, too. As an aside, the same thing happend with us with our house in 1985.  We had a crummy looking neighbor and, after the house was listed for months and we had changed realtors and finally a buyer came along, the bank said it was worth somewhat less and I was mad! Of course we were very anxious and the experienced realtor urged us to accept the lower amount and comply with the deal.

 

Now, back on topic....

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Also, I forgot....When I was driving down Euclid the other day, the site across from the Tech Park that has just been a picture for the last year or so started moving dirt around.

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Also, I forgot....When I was driving down Euclid the other day, the site across from the Tech Park that has just been a picture for the last year or so started moving dirt around.

 

Which site is this? Cross street, please.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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Also, I forgot....When I was driving down Euclid the other day, the site across from the Tech Park that has just been a picture for the last year or so started moving dirt around.

 

Which site is this? Cross street, please.

 

I'm thinking he means E.69 and Euclid Ave.

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You're referring to the corner just beyond Dunham Tavern? That's renovation of a building so I wouldn't associate it with "moving dirt around" at this stage. I don't think there are any more "pictures" around.

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Ya...corner of E 69 and Euclid...It looked like the building was just being renovated in the "pic" of it posted at the site, but they definitely dug into the grass on the site.  I'll pay more attention this weekend when I'm out that way:)

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Jerry seems to have confirmed today in the RTA thread that Cumberland bought the building.

 

He just confirmed that RTA's board authorized RTA to enter into the purchase and sale contract.  Assuming the parties did go to contract, closing is probably a few weeks away, or even several weeks if Cumberland negotiated for an extended due diligence period for environmental review.  There's no sign it's off track, but I don't think it's quite done yet.

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food truck owner to open restaurant inside historic agora theater

Thursday, January 19, 2012

 

From cable TV shows to busy downtown streets, food trucks are all the rage these days. Yet short of firing up a Winnebago or launching a fleet of food trucks, owners' growth plans are limited by size. "It's such a small space, everything has to be done more frequently," complains Jae Stulock of Umami Moto, which dishes out Asian fusion cuisine to hungry lunch crowds and late night revelers everywhere.

 

Stulock's solution? First, he found an unused kitchen in the Agora Theatre that could be used for all-important prep work. Once that was secured, he decided to launch a restaurant to complement his fast-moving food truck business.

 

http://www.freshwatercleveland.com/devnews/thehipprestaurant011912.aspx

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HISTORIC CLEVELAND AGORA TO BE REJUVENATED

CLEVELAND (Jan. 4, 2012) – Once considered one of the nation’s top music venues, the Agora Theatre will soon be the major cornerstone of revitalization efforts in Cleveland’s MidTown neighborhood thanks to a generous donation from the LoConti family...

 

http://www.midtowncleveland.org/news.asp?id=113

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1/9/2012 - Planning Study underway for E. 55th St. & Euclid Ave. intersection

MidTown Cleveland, Inc. is undertaking a planning study for the area surrounding the East 55th and Euclid intersection and we need your input. We ask that you click the link below and please take a few minutes to complete the survey. Your answers will help determine future improvements to our neighborhood!

 

(Please feel free to share with friends, too. Every opinion counts!)

 

East 55th / Euclid Crossroads Planning Study Survey

 

www.surveymonkey.com

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