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Cleveland: Midtown: Development and News

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I already did it for him to keep us out of legal hot water. Thanks!


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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I already did it for him to keep us out of legal hot water. Thanks!

 

No problem. I was going to edit it for him but I think my editing powers are only good in the To Be Cleaned thread.!

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It looks like this is going to be the vacant land on the south side of Chester between E. 65th and 66th.  It is where the giant sculpture "The Politician: A Toy" used to be located.

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Cleveland partners unveil plans for a Health-Tech Corridor along Euclid Avenue

 

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2010/04/cleveland_partners_unveil_plan.html

 

Intersting info in the article:

"Evidence of demand is the Euclid Tech Center, a $25 million, 150,000-square-foot project to be built speculatively, without tenants in hand, at Euclid and East 69th Street."

 

 

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Just wanted to add something to this thread... Euclid between E. 55th and the E. 70s seems to be almost completely cleared on the north side of the street.  I'm hoping to see some type of renderings or plans for the area within the near future.  An updated plan for the district would be better... anyone have any clues about what's going on?

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Cleveland's abandoned Warner & Swasey complex could become a tech center

By Michelle Jarboe, The Plain Dealer

May 27, 2010, 5:34PM

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A local developer could revive the former Warner & Swasey Co. facility, a dilapidated and boarded-up complex that looms over East 55th Street and Carnegie Avenue.

 

The city of Cleveland, which owns the property, is working on a deal with Hemingway Development and HzW Environmental Consultants LLC. Hemingway, a division of the Geis Cos. of Streetsboro, wants to restore the 130-year-old buildings for offices, labs and warehousing or manufacturing space -- uses that fit with an effort to brand and promote the Midtown area of Cleveland as a health and technology corridor....

 

more at:

 

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2010/05/clevelands_abandoned_warner_sw.html

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Absolutely. This would be phenomenal news if they get this project going. It is an important intersection and a key gateway out of downtown.

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This is particuarly exciting seeing as I was at a seminar of sorts 2-3 months back and actually heard Tracy Nichols say, "Now that the Howard Johnson building is down, my number 1 priority for the next year is to demolish the Warner Swasey building".

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Wow.  Awesome.  Count me as surprised though.  Seems like Geis is getting a bit bullish on Midtown.  This is their second planned development in the area.

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This is particuarly exciting seeing as I was at a seminar of sorts 2-3 months back and actually heard Tracy Nichols say, "Now that the Howard Johnson building is down, my number 1 priority for the next year is to demolish the Warner Swasey building".

 

What?  That's insane.  This is one of my favorite buildings in town, different from the HoJo building in every imaginable way.

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"The project also would include parking in an area now occupied by a building with a sawtoothed roof."

 

I wondered if this meant the demolition of the sawtoothed building...., similar to the reasoning at Tyler Village.  Although they could have indoor parking in these buildings.   

 

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Another "warehouse to tech center" conversion.  Call me a cynic, but I'll believe it when it's done.

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This building wold look fantastic restored. I love the character on this one. Of all the warehouses this city has/had...there are some really worth saving...many other just the same old same old.. But this one is special and worth saving.

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This is particuarly exciting seeing as I was at a seminar of sorts 2-3 months back and actually heard Tracy Nichols say, "Now that the Howard Johnson building is down, my number 1 priority for the next year is to demolish the Warner Swasey building".

 

How lovely it is when our top econonomic development priorities are the demolition of beautiful buildings.

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Also from the article about redeveloping the Warner & Swasey building:

 

Geis, his brother Greg and the Coyne family also hope to build a technology center at Euclid Avenue and East 69th Street, in the heart of the Cleveland Health-Tech Corridor. The partners shared updated drawings of that project with city design officials last week.

 

Would love to see/hear about those drawings to see how that design is coming along.  And the hospital too.

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This is particuarly exciting seeing as I was at a seminar of sorts 2-3 months back and actually heard Tracy Nichols say, "Now that the Howard Johnson building is down, my number 1 priority for the next year is to demolish the Warner Swasey building".

 

These are the people running this city.  Unbelievable.  Not surprising commentary from someone that's an accountant and is running an important urban economic agency.  Shouldn't these people have some sort of background in urban planning, or at the very least, some common sense?

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From Plain Dealer reporter Michelle Jarboe:

 

Re: Willyboy's question about the section of the complex with the saw-tooth roof, Fred Geis told me that he just wants to replace the roof and use that portion of the facility for covered parking. He is hoping that Hemingway won't need to tear any part of the building down, though the city's request for proposals to redevelop the property allowed developers to do anything from demolishing the entire complex to saving and renovating the whole thing.

 

Tracey Nichols at the city told me that the RFP review panel considered proposals from two developers. The other developer, whose proposal was rejected, wanted to demolish the buildings.

 

It's interesting that you mentioned Tyler Village. I think Hemingway is looking at Tyler Village as a model for what they might be able to do with this property.

 

Michelle

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Yes you have!  But we also have one right around the corner that just got demolished after years of languishing, and one Downtown that doesn't seem to be going anywhere fast.  Maybe part of the key is that you guys aren't as focused on one type of tenant?

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probably part of it. We also don't take a giant front end risk, building it out as we get tenants in. More expensive dollar for dollar, but less front end risk.

 

I'm pretty sure Fred Geis can get this done, though. He's the right developer for MidTown in general and this building in particular.

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Anyone have a pic of it?   I cant remember it

thanks

If your talking about the Warner & Swasey building, theres a picture of it in the story upthread in post 456.

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Midtown project attempt to 'resettle' city

 

Without committed tenants, Geis' planned $20M Euclid Tech Center will require unique financing

By STAN BULLARD

4:30 am, June 21, 2010

 

 

Fred Geis sees his group's effort to develop a $20 million office/ warehouse building in Cleveland's Midtown neighborhood oriented to medical and tech tenants as more than a real estate development.

 

Indeed, Mr. Geis, one of two brothers running the Streetsboro-based Geis Cos., describes the project as part of his personal mission to “resettle Cleveland.”

 

Meanwhile, the city of Cleveland is trying a novel tack to get the proposed Euclid Tech Center financed. Even before the credit crunch, lenders were reluctant to fund a project such as the one Mr. Geis is proposing. He wants to build the project on a speculative basis, without tenants committed to it before the project wins crucial development loans.

 

The city's financing strategy stems from using a $10.7 million U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Section 108 Loan as the first mortgage, essentially, for the project. Cleveland City Council on June 7 approved the loan application and a $250,000 grant from the city's Vacant Property Initiative.

 

 

http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20100621/SUB1/306219993

 

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MH, the article is in the subscription only area.  Would you mind giving us a nuts and bolts synopsis of the article, please?

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MH, the article is in the subscription only area.  Would you mind giving us a nuts and bolts synopsis of the article, please?

 

Here's my breakdown:

 

Fred Geis and the City of Cleveland are pushing to build the $20 mil office/warehouse building on E.67 and Euclid Ave.

 

Financing breakdown:

 

-  $10.7 mil  U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Section 108 Loan as the first mortgage

-  $250K -- city's Vacant Property Initiative.

-  $3.5 mil state's Job-Ready Sites Program

-  New Markets Tax Credit (federal program for job-creating businesses in urban areas)  Another loan has to be in place for Geis to qualify (here's info on it: http://www.cdfifund.gov/what_we_do/programs_id.asp?programID=5)

 

Mr. Geis lives in Cleveland and has plenty of real estate experience.

 

Mr. Geis currently has no tenants; however, he is banking on the expansions of CWRU, CSU, and the Health Care Industries to produce enough demand to fill his "little building."

 

No timeline is given.

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^Great summary- thanks!  Interesting that Geis lives in the city- I wouldn't have guessed it for the proprietor of a Streetsboro based business.

 

The big red flag design-wise:

Mr. Geis said the project will provide flex office space — space that can serve as offices and warehouse or assembly space with garage doors for truck entry — in the city. [Emphasis added]

 

Please let those garage doors face the rear.

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This is truely a scary development.  The thing is, it would be less outrageous if it wasn't to be placed on anyother main thoroughfare.  Chester, Carnegie, etc...

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Is this the development at E. 69 th street?  Isn't suppose to go all the way to Carnegie (that beautiful boulevard)?  If this is the case I would imagine garage doors would be off of 69th or some sort of access from Carnegie at the rear of the property, not on Euclid.  My biggest concern is what it will look like on Eucild...since some of it is warehouse space I am concerned about large stretches of blank walls.

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Is this the development at E. 69 th street?  Isn't suppose to go all the way to Carnegie (that beautiful boulevard)?  If this is the case I would imagine garage doors would be off of 69th or some sort of access from Carnegie at the rear of the property, not on Euclid.  My biggest concern is what it will look like on Eucild...since some of it is warehouse space I am concerned about large stretches of blank walls.

 

The address according to the article is 6700 Euclid Ave.

 

From the previous article:

 

Geis, his brother Greg and the Coyne family also hope to build a technology center at Euclid Avenue and East 69th Street, in the heart of the Cleveland Health-Tech Corridor. The partners shared updated drawings of that project with city design officials last week. The Euclid Tech Center would target biotechnology and health care companies.

 

So maybe the project spans the area...?

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I think renderings of this project were posted here before, and if it's the one I'm thinking of, we pretty well ripped its design to shreds as being inappropriate for a transit/pedestrian corridor like Euclid. Others suggested it might be better on Carnegie.


"Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you respond." -- Coach Lou Holtz

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^Actually, I don't think we've seen rendering.  I believe someone described some early massing they saw, but that's about it.  Tough to know what to expect until we hear/see more, I guess, but I'm optimistic there won't be garage doors facing Euclid.

 

The streets south of Euclid jump from 65th to 69th, so the site is described in different ways.  In person, it's clearly marked with a big trailer with "Geis" written on the side.  Pretty sure it's the big lot south of Euclid visible here: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Cleveland,+OH&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=39.644047,106.083984&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Cleveland,+Cuyahoga,+Ohio&ll=41.503258,-81.641845&spn=0.002294,0.006475&z=18

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If it's a warehouse you've gotta have truck access, and it's often in the rear.  I don't expect trouble there.  I just hope it will have multiple stories in the front and no lawn buffer.

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I can't recall if these were ever linked to before, but the Cleveland City Planning Commission website now has renderings of the proposed senior housing and supportive housing projects on Euclid in the mid 70s that were discussed above:

 

Senior housing: http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/projects/detail.php?ID=38

 

Supportive housing: http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/projects/detail.php?ID=37

 

Neither looks to be a thrilling design, but not total disasters.  Both are 4 stories, more or less right up on the sidewalk. Lots of brick and other types of siding. 

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Not bad really, especially the second one.  Unfortunately, in both cases, the limitations on who will live there will also limit spinoff potential.  In that sense I think these represent lost opportunity for Euclid and should have been placed elsewhere.

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I really like the old police station on Payne. I hope that there will be use made of the building and that it will not be demolished. It has a real old school police station look to it...  It reminds me of Eliot Ness days.

 

 

Cleveland, developer work out unusual financing for Third District police station project

 

Published: Friday, July 16, 2010, 5:45 PM

Michelle Jarboe, The Plain Dealer Michelle Jarboe, The Plain Dealer

 

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A police station project in Cleveland could move 195 officers to Midtown and open up two city properties -- one in University Circle and the other near Cleveland State University -- for private development.

 

The city wants to build a new Third District police station on the former....  Read the rest at:

 

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2010/07/cleveland_developer_work_out_u.html

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I am not usually the one to bust on a rendering because I understand that architecture is subjective

(as I will profess my love for Moca in another thread), but where in Middleburgh Hts. is this going...uhgg

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trust me, without knowing the details, and assuming the actual building will look nothing like that, its STILL a god send from what is there now. Despite the fact the current district is 50 years old, fairly confident the ONLY reason this is happening is the city will gain ALOT from selling the current site, all of which I support, however I don't think the needs of the city are a concern here as opposed to the needs of the cities pocketbook for the current real estate

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