Jump to content
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sign in to follow this  
Guest zaceman

Cleveland: Midtown: Development and News

Recommended Posts

the bldg by 30th and euclid doesn't look that different.  maybe some internal fixes?

 

 

It looks like they are making changes to the curtain wall, (The exterior wall with the metal panels and windows), and adding signage. It's hard to tell since the "after" rendering is in black and white.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another random question: Does anyone know the history about the Brownstone Inn on Prospect Ave? I've always thought it was a pretty interesting building that has tons of potential.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the pic excites me....  that part of midtown can still seem pretty dead....  the new hotel and grocery store make me hopeful for a bit more life.... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm excited to see more development happening in Mid-Town, but is there any chance anything taller than 100ft will get built? With all the open space in the area, I feel like it's the perfect opportunity to add density and essentially develop another downtown like feel. Wouldn't be too bad to extend the skyline as well....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, Cleveland would need to grow population and jobs.

 

To be slightly more optimistic, this PART of Cleveland needs to grow jobs and population.  In terms of the former, the progress in the last decade has been pretty remarkable.  The Health Corridor, the new Rainbow Womens & Children hospital, and the office buildings Geis and others built on spec have created some momentum.  Not to mention the Cleveland Clinic just down the street.  The jobs seem to be coming left and right; hopefully residential and attendant mixed uses will follow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm excited to see more development happening in Mid-Town, but is there any chance anything taller than 100ft will get built? With all the open space in the area, I feel like it's the perfect opportunity to add density and essentially develop another downtown like feel. Wouldn't be too bad to extend the skyline as well....

 

That is, unfortunately, the opposite of how things work.  Density develops a little at a time, as land becomes more scarce and expensive.  When you have a large surplus of land, it is cheap, and so development tends to be more low rise and spread out.  As things get built, though, the land gets more scarce and expensive, and therefore higher densities are needed by the developers to make projects work.  Also, the success of previous projects makes it more likely that developers can get financing and tenants to achieve more ambitious projects.

 

Midtown is still early in this process- but it is making strides!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm excited to see more development happening in Mid-Town, but is there any chance anything taller than 100ft will get built? With all the open space in the area, I feel like it's the perfect opportunity to add density and essentially develop another downtown like feel. Wouldn't be too bad to extend the skyline as well....

 

That is, unfortunately, the opposite of how things work.  Density develops a little at a time, as land becomes more scarce and expensive.  When you have a large surplus of land, it is cheap, and so development tends to be more low rise and spread out.  As things get built, though, the land gets more scarce and expensive, and therefore higher densities are needed by the developers to make projects work.  Also, the success of previous projects makes it more likely that developers can get financing and tenants to achieve more ambitious projects.

 

Midtown is still early in this process- but it is making strides!

 

University Circle is more of Cleveland's "second Downtown" than MidTown. There isn't a lot of space, and has more immediate opportunities to build up. Its already expanding out into other neighborhoods -"Circle North", into MidTown, etc. It also has One University Circle as its litmus test for taller buildings. The inner west side is also (I think) more likely to see taller buildings, at least apartment projects. MidTown is a very large space with a lot of vacancy that's attractive to campus style developments like Link 59, Pierres, Applied Industrial Technologies, etc. It's also attractive for townhomes and shorter mixed-use development with more floor space like the Innova project. Maybe one day it'll be littered with some taller buildings, but we'd need businesses and residents to fill that need.

 

Side note, will MidTown ever become a "real" neighborhood versus a conglomerate of other neighborhoods?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doubtful, unless there is a massive population influx. Neigborhoods today that are arguably flourishing, like the ones west, never became no man's land wastelands like so much of Midtown. Tremont had a rough time in the 70s and 80s, but it was still a real neighborhood with homes, commercial activity, and a healthy mix of middle and working class near the low income households. Also, racially, yeah, it was still somewhat diverse, and that balance had a huge impact in slowing a total collapse.

 

Midtown... a much sadder fall without such stabilizing forces. Gays, hipsters, foreigners, artists, millenials, boomerangs, commercial developers - yeah, they're just not interested. Too many other affordable options out there

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great, more useless green space across the street from... more useless unusable green space. What a waste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doubtful, unless there is a massive population influx. Neigborhoods today that are arguably flourishing, like the ones west, never became no man's land wastelands like so much of Midtown. Tremont had a rough time in the 70s and 80s, but it was still a real neighborhood with homes, commercial activity, and a healthy mix of middle and working class near the low income households. Also, racially, yeah, it was still somewhat diverse, and that balance had a huge impact in slowing a total collapse.

 

Midtown... a much sadder fall without such stabilizing forces. Gays, hipsters, foreigners, artists, millenials, boomerangs, commercial developers - yeah, they're just not interested. Too many other affordable options out there

 

I think this is more than a little too pessimistic!  While Midtown isn't going to be an upscale urban fantasy-land anytime soon, the amount of development over the last decade or so makes me quite optimistic that it is turning into an at least functional urban corridor. 

 

Consider:

-Multiple tech incubators/office buildings built or under construction

-Dealer Tire HQ

-UH facility/Link59

-Dave's Supermarket

-Tru Hilton

-New Cleveland Children's Museum

-renovated Agora and Masonic Auditorium

-residential reuse of office buildings creeping eastward from CSU

-new townhouses

 

It's just too easy to get wrapped up in all Midtown isn't and forget the progress it has seen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not going to be hipsterland, but I think there's going to be enough people who are going to want to live near the hospitals that will help to build up some kind of a modest resident base.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not going to be hipsterland, but I think there's going to be enough people who are going to want to live near the hospitals that will help to build up some kind of a modest resident base.

 

I'm currently on the market for a house as many of you know. Catch 22 with Midtown is that the new construction where we feel safe is out of our price range, and the homes we like would be in our price range, including big renovations, but aren't on safe streets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MidTown Gets A Modern Makeover

 

The One Midtown Townhomes are part of the neighborhood's $152 million in new development expected to be completed in 2018.

 

There’s a change coming to MidTown.

 

On a swath of Millionaires’ Row once home to shipbuilder and real estate magnate Morris A. Bradley, One Midtown’s 23 luxury townhomes are attempting to restore some of the former glory to the oft forgotten stretch of Euclid Avenue.

 

“In the early 1900s, it represented [one of] the wealthiest neighborhoods in the entire world,” says Justin Campbell, director of luxury sales for Signature Collection. “What we’re looking to do is bring that high-end residential component back.”

 

https://clevelandmagazine.com/at-home/articles/midtown-gets-a-modern-makeover#.W1sWa3sLK94.twitter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vintage Tea & Coffee

‏@VintageTnC

 

Have you visited our new spot in midtown Cleveland? We’re in our soft opening phase, offering a partial menu. We’re here from 7:30am to 3pm during weekdays. We’d love to see you!!!

 

DkFsJQSXoAIVET-.jpg:large

 

DkFsJQVXcAAXtQg.jpg:large

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see any of the pictures that some people post for some reason.  In fact, nothing even marks that they are supposed to be there, but missing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's another potential project coming to the fore....

 

http://www.loopnet.com/for-sale/cleveland-oh/?e=u

 

Midtown Redevelopment Project

Cleveland, OH 44103 ·  121,040 SF Total ·  Retail Properties

 

Sale Notes

• Mixed-use Development project totaling 71,610 SF on 1.75 acres in the heart of Midtown

• Neighboring the Link 59 Building, University Hospital, Dave’s Market and the Phoenix Building

• Along the Health Corridor on Euclid Avenue

• At the corner of East 63rd and Euclid Avenue with over 15,232 vehicles per day

• Less than eight minutes from the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, and Case Western Reserve University

• Twenty minutes from Hopkins International Airport

• Easy to access from east, west, and south, with eight major access points to the interstate highway system (I-71, I-77, I-90 and the East 55th Street link to I-490)

• Eight minutes to Cleveland Public Square

 

BROCHURE: https://images2.loopnet.com/d2/MJ-WwqaDbZKL4dZuWjPrTDvrr5kaxxyRnCq_GBo8mAs/document.pdf

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

image.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^I am surprised Hemingway did not/has not bought the buildings.  Maybe they feel they currently have too many balls in the air.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hopefully someone takes this on. The buildings certainly look old and underused enough to be good candidates for the historic preservation credit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recently took a tour of the always-fun Dunham Tavern and the tour guide (who is on the museum's board) said the One Midtown condos are selling pretty briskly, even with the $400K price point (which is indeed what they are asking for on their website).

 

Pretty amazing turn of events, given where this area has been in my lifetime.  One, the fact that the condos (condos!) got financed in the first place in that part of Cleveland.  Two, that there are buyers willing to pay that price in what has not been a residential neighborhood in such a long time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the fact that Midtown is equal distance between downtown and university circle. You have the best of both worlds in terms of sporting events and plays in the former and museums and concerts in the latter. Easy bike ride either way. Midtown doesn't have its own identity but the location is very good and is its best selling point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the fact that Midtown is equal distance between downtown and university circle. You have the best of both worlds in terms of sporting events and plays in the former and museums and concerts in the latter. Easy bike ride either way. Midtown doesn't have its own identity but the location is very good and is its best selling point.

 

I would love to see how it would have developed if the Health Line was a high frequency light rail tram. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recently took a tour of the always-fun Dunham Tavern and the tour guide (who is on the museum's board) said the One Midtown condos are selling pretty briskly, even with the $400K price point (which is indeed what they are asking for on their website).

 

Pretty amazing turn of events, given where this area has been in my lifetime.  One, the fact that the condos (condos!) got financed in the first place in that part of Cleveland.  Two, that there are buyers willing to pay that price in what has not been a residential neighborhood in such a long time.

 

"Luxury real estate" is artificially affordable in Cleveland due to the tax abatement for better or worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the fact that Midtown is equal distance between downtown and university circle. You have the best of both worlds in terms of sporting events and plays in the former and museums and concerts in the latter. Easy bike ride either way. Midtown doesn't have its own identity but the location is very good and is its best selling point.

 

Jeff Epstein over at the CDC there is working on an identify for the area. I think they are going to rollout signage throughout with the Midtown Moniker. What it needs though is a "Downtown." A cencentration of shops, bars and restaurants that is the center of that area, much like what West 25th, Cedar/Fairmount or Cedar/Lee have.

 

That intersection of 55th and Euclid would work well, but maybe even the Church Square area, but that may be too far east.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That would be great to see. Weren't they starting that with the Penn Square branding for the Euclid-East 55th area, which was a mini-downtown before the 1970s? I think that area works, what with the Agora theater and the office conversions in the area. They can supply foot traffic in the weekdays, evenings and weekends. Church Square could be more of a retail mini-downtown and some of the old churches could be renovated with new uses, including for pop-up businesses/shops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cleveland Development Advisors (CDA), the real estate affiliate of the Greater Cleveland Partnership, provided a $250,000 loan to facilitate the opening of The Cleveland Bagel Company’s second location on Cleveland’s east side.  The new location at 7501 Carnegie will give Cleveland Bagel access to a larger food production facility allowing the company to expand its wholesale market.  In addition, the retail operation will add a much-needed amenity to the Midtown neighborhood.  “We are thrilled to welcome Cleveland Bagel to MidTown, adding another high-quality food destination to serve the growing base of employees and residents in our diverse neighborhood,” said Jeff Epstein, Executive Director of MidTown Cleveland.

 

MORE:

https://www.gcpartnership.com/Stay%20Informed%20on%20News%20and%20Policy/Newsroom/~/link.aspx?_id=0FC2A601B37E40A49C5ABFE1B290742B&_z=z

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×