Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Florida Guy

Cleveland Neighborhoods

Recommended Posts

I have "attempted" to start an outline of Cleveland's neighborhoods for reference here on UO.

 

This map seems to correspond with the map on the City of Cleveland's website. It can all be very confusing, for instance, doesn’t West Park = Kamms Corners + Jefferson? Then there are sub-neighborhoods within neighborhoods (like Slavic Village within North Broadway as discussed yesterday). According to this map would Duck Island's main neighborhood be Ohio City or Tremont?

 

Those that are more knowledgeable on this subject feel free to make corrections and/or additions to the outline. Add the various "Districts" like Asia Town, etc. to their main neighborhoods.

 

spamaplarge.gif

 

I. Downtown

a. Gateway

b. Warehouse District

c. Theater District

d. Flats

 

II. East Side

a. Kirtland Park

b. St. Clair-Superior

c. Glenville

d. Forest Hills

e. South Collinwood

f. North Collinwood

    i.          Waterloo

g. Euclid Green

h. Central

i. Hough

j. University

    i.          Little Italy

k. Fairfax

l. Industrial Valley

m. North Broadway

    i. Slavic Village

n.    South Broadway

o. Kinsman

p. Woodland Hills

q. Buckeye-Shaker

    i. Shaker Square

    ii.    Larchmere

r. Union-Miles Park

s. Mt. Pleasant

t. Corlett

u. Lee-Miles

 

III. West Side

a. Ohio City

b. Detroit Shoreway

c. Tremont

     i.       Duck Island

d. Edgewater

e. Cudell

f. Clark-Fulton

g. Brooklyn Centre

h. Old Brooklyn

i. Stockyards

j. West Blvd.

k. Jefferson

l. Kamms Corners

m. Puritas-Longmead

n. Riverside

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love maps like these... make you want to go out and explore every nook and cranny.  Where's Cleveland Heights?  Should be just East of Uni Heights... no?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love maps like these... make you want to go out and explore every nook and cranny.  Where's Cleveland Heights?  Should be just East of Uni Heights... no?

 

This map only contains the neighborhoods inside the municipal boundaries of Cleveland. Cleveland Hts is just to the east of the "University" sector.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love maps like these... make you want to go out and explore every nook and cranny.  Where's Cleveland Heights?  Should be just East of Uni Heights... no?

 

This map only contains the neighborhoods inside the municipal boundaries of Cleveland. Cleveland Hts is just to the east of the "University" sector.

 

sector? why do i feel like i'm in logans run?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could throw Larchmere into the Buckeye-Shaker area and I think Little Italy/Murray Hill is part of University.  Wade Park (if you want to call that a separate neighborhood) is either in University or Glenville.  Waterloo is part of one of the Collinwood's

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asiatown is Goodrich-Kirtland and a little bit of downtown. I believe the border between St. Clair Superior and Goodrich-Kirtland is E. 55th. Asiatown runs from about E. 21st (if you include Old Chinatown) to about E. 40th between St. Clair and Perkins-ish.

 

One of the reasons that the nabes and sub-nabes and sub-sub-nabes is so confusing is that the Statistical Planning Areas group and bi-sect neighborhoods differently than CDCs do. St-Clair Superior CDC, for instance, serves both the St. Clair Superior and the Goodrich-Gannett SPAs. Meanwhile, even though Asiatown is almost exclusively in the Goodrich-Gannett SPA, it's represented by three CDCs: St. Clair Superior (the majority of the nabe), Midtown (south side of Payne and south) and the Quadrangle (west of E. 30th). Confusing, no?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

having worked with folks in the neighborhood,I think Central is actually one of the better "inner city" neighborhoods with exception of some of the public housing areas off 55th and perhaps south of community college. I am sure people will disagree with me though. I have found Union miles, mt Pleasant, Kingsman, and stockyards to be dicier. I am less familiar with the nabes up by University Circle and South ie broadway.  I always thought Hough,Fairfax and woodland hills were OK too in comparison. However I have not worked the eastside neighborhoods in a few years so things could have changed with all the forclosures. l

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure if I've ever been to those four southwestern neighborhoods... what are they like (housing stock, business districts, local culture, transit, topography, demographics, whatever, etc.)? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^if you mean Jefferson,kamms, riverside, puritas, they are rather suburban in feel, mostly 30'5- 50's era housing stock, The red line runs through there. A lot  of fire and law enforcement folks live in Westpark, so it offers some stability (due to long time home ownership) but that could change if they are allowed to flee to the burbs.  I would say in general (well historically) there are a lot of Irish Catholic whites, long time Clevelanders. The business districts tend to be older strip mall like, there is some light industry throughout. Kamm's Corner is a larger business area and it is near Fairview Hosp (a branch of the Cleveland Clinic). Along the Metropark there are some larger colonials, but in general, I think little bungalows and cape cods are the rule.  Of all the Cleve neighborhoods these tend to have the most suburban feel (perhaps like Parma or Brooklyn)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love those big old colonials north of Lorain off RR Dr. This from wikipedia: The area is predomenatly an Irish neihborhood. Some teenagers refer to the area as "Dub-P".  :?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Kamm's Corner area is kind of a mix of streetcar-suburban and 1950's suburbia, because most of its development happened during those two time periods (the streetcars were torn out right around the time the neighborhood was in its infant stages).  Hence the mix of old-style colonials and new-style bungalows.  The neighborhood gets more older and denser as you travel north toward Lakewood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, looks like you spent a large amount of time, very good job.

 

I can't take credit I only provided the outline. I should have given the link to the graphic:

 

http://www.nhlink.net/

 

dub-P = WP = West Park

 

Oh, as in George Dubu.  :-)

 

Yeah, there's a bunch, but which ones would you take an outsider to?

 

Tremont, Ohio City, Shaker Square, Little Italy, University Circle, and Edgewater to name a few.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC, Central is pretty rough.

 

What's your basis for that statement?

 

I work in Central, and the neighborhood is very, very quiet.  It's become a beautiful neighborhood...easily one of the city's most under-appreciated gems.  There are hundreds and hundreds of new single-family homes, which have had the effect of eliminating the criminal element. 

 

Stat for you about how new development has positive social implications:  According to data attained from Case Western Reserve University’s NEO CANDO system, the redevelopment of the former Longwood Plaza has effectively decreased all drug activity by which it had been plagued. The number of illicit drug offenses resulting in arrest plummeted from 104 in 2002 to only 2 in 2005 when Arbor Park Place completed and opened for business.  Similarly, drug possession arrests dropped from 91 to just 2 in this same time period.

 

I can provide additional stats, if you'd like.  Or, if a tour would be beneficial, just drop me a PM.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to see more stats!  Central has been doing a very good job at physical revitalization, which is obvious to anyone who spends any time there.  I hadn't seen any stats regarding crime rates/home appreciation/etc in years, though.  I have known several people who live around there, they tend to still emphasize the negative (if maybe just to boost their street cred as "tough").

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Central has come a long way, and I don't think it gets the attention it should from the community on just how far. That being said, most of the neighborhood indicators do still lag behind the city averages. That's not to detract from the progress that has been made and continues to be made ... most likely the result of continuing of concentrated poverty in the neighborhood. But all the trends are moving in the right direction. Keep in mind that most of the statistics are from 2000, although the crime stats are through 2006.

 

Central neighborhood data from NEOCANDO:

 

% of individuals below poverty line, 1990: 76.7%

% below poverty line, 2000: 65.1%

Still well above the city average (26.3%)

 

Median household income, 1990: $5,712

Median household income, 2000: $11,236

Still well below the city average ($33,651)

 

% of individuals 25+ with at least a high school degree, 1990: 41.8%

% of individuals, 2000: 54.8%

Still below the city average (69.0%)

 

% of individuals 25+ with at least a college degree, 1990: 2.0%

% of individuals, 2000: 4.2%

Still well below the city average (11.4%)

 

% of housing units that were vacant, 1990: 29.2%

% of housing units, 2000: 18.4%

Still above the city average (as of 2000, 11.7%)

 

Serious violent crimes per 100,000 population, 1990: 5,773.1

Serious violent crimes, 2006: 4,335.5

Still well above the city average (1,639.6)

 

Serious property crimes per 100,000 population, 1990: 11,887

Serious property crimes, 2006: 8,324.1

Still above the city average (6,113.5)

 

Drug arrests per 100,000 population, 1990: 3,677.1

Drug arrests per 100,000 population, 2006: 2,974.1

Still above the city average (1,450.4)

 

Child maltreatment per 1,000 population under the age of 18, 1990: 61.4

Child maltreatment, 2006: 19.3

Still above the city average (15.0)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so which areas are the rough areas?  Which are the not so rough areas?  Sorry, I dont know CLand that well. 

 

I have a family member that teaches in the Hough area. She said besides the mini mansions and nice pockets, it is hard living. This is a woman that grew up in inner city Cleveland (in what was a good neighborhood at the time but she still knows what is *truly* rough and what isn't). She taught in SE Cleveland and said the mindset of the kids in the "hoods" there is different from impoverished kids in Hough and other impoverished parts of the NE side. She said the poverty is more apparent. For one, I've noticed a lot more projects/tenement housing in this area.

 

I have family throughout Mt. Pleasant and although it isn't a great neighborhood I would much rather live there than Hough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think Hough is that bad.  Granted, I don't live there and I was driving and walking.  It appears in much better shape than it did in the '80s.  The area in the 70s blocks of Hough appeared to be the worst.  But the 100s and the 90s looks like people are renovating and upgrading.  One thing I did like, is the neighbors all know each other, unlike the suburbs (well cleve. hts/shaker hts.) where they are trying to out-do each other.

 

The Mt. Caramel and Mt. Pleasant areas are nice.  The area around Luke Easter Park is really nice as well.  I like the way the single family and double family homes line the streets and stand shoulder to shoulder with one another.

 

What is the area around Fairhill and Woodhill, its seems really nice also.  There are many areas that to me look nice but not sure what they are like for a resident.  The last time I was at home, my parents went to a party at a old friends home near miles and lee road, in the vicinity to the old miles drive in.  There are lots of ranch homes and lush lawns, it looked and felt very suburban.

 

I bet there are plenty of nice or stable neighborhoods in Cleveland that people have a flawed opinion.

 

to me, an outsider, it appears that the city and real estate lobbyist have thrown all their support behind downtown, ohio city, university circle, tremont and now detroit shoreway. I rarely see/read articles about popular neighborhoods like edgewater, china town, forest hills or shaker square.  It just seems weird and makes it appear to outsiders that outside those area's i first mentioned the city is poor, black and going to hell in a hand basket.  You would think the paper, city, county would do their best to correct those misconceptions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nobody has really mentioned any of the west Side areas that have become "dicey."

Parts of West Boulevard, Detroit Shoreway, Stockyards, Cudell and Jefferson are increasingly becoming as dangerous as anything previously mentioned. Maybe more so.

 

How bad you ask? Well here is some data from NeoCanDo showing specific crimes per 100,000. The real interesting part is the total number of crimes in each neighborhood compared to the total number of crimes in the city.

 

I need to move.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nobody has really mentioned any of the west Side areas that have become "dicey."

Parts of West Boulevard, Detroit Shoreway, Stockyards, Cudell and Jefferson are increasingly becoming as dangerous as anything previously mentioned. Maybe more so.

 

How bad you ask? Well here is some data from NeoCanDo showing specific crimes per 100,000. The real interesting part is the total number of crimes in each neighborhood compared to the total number of crimes in the city.

 

I need to move.

 

 

 

 

I believe I did in another thread (in fact I think I used the word "dicey" even!)I know I mentioned  that Central was not as bad as people say. But who would think OC has worse reported crime than Central? I guess I am so used to OC that while I am always on my toes, I do not think I am at any great risk. I will have to pour over this when I have more time, certainly a lot to analyze and comment on (such as why DT rates are as high as they are....I can already think of reasons). Also different types of criminal activity can stand out more. I know when I mentioned Union Miles as dicey, it involved the aggressive approach drug dealers made when I was working in the neighborhood (surronding car). That kind of thing sticks in your mind. It also could be lower reporting rates in some areas (a "why even bother" attitude may prevail)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Don't forget that "Ohio City" includes Riverview and lots of blocks south of Lorain.  It would be really interesting to see the crimes mapped out in each neighborhood to see where exactly they occurred (a la Compstat).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Don't forget that "Ohio City" includes Riverview and lots of blocks south of Lorain.  It would be really interesting to see the crimes mapped out in each neighborhood to see where exactly they occurred (a la Compstat).

 

If I remember later, I'll do a crime map by census tract in NEOCANDO ... I think that's the smallest area that we can retrieve info for through NEOCANDO.

 

I'd actually anticipate more crimes (particularly burglaries and robberies) taking place in more gentrified areas of the neighborhood, as these would present more opportunities for financial return for a thief. In fact, I would anticipate that that's where you would see the highest theft rates in the city ... areas where relatively wealthy people are living in very close proximity to relatively poor individuals, rather than where we traditionally think such crimes take place (e.g. truly impoverished stretches of the city). Assaults, murders and rapes ... not sure if that hypothesis would carry over. I'd also anticipate that crime rates are lower in neighborhoods where there is the impression that a large concentration of police officers reside and/or that have relatively high levels of police patrol.

 

To speak to Musky's point, it does appear that a number of West Side neighborhoods are equally, if not more, dangerous than the eastern neighborhoods we typically hear about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

interesting about the law enforcement theory. However those neighborhood also are the furthest west in Cleveland and the most suburban. To do a match on the cop- in --the- neighborhood- thus more patrol theory, it would be intereresting to look where LE folks are living citywide. Certainly westpark (Kamms, and Jefferson nabes I guess) are known for the white Irish cop population. There is not a lot of diversty out that way, so where are officers of color living? My money would be on Buckeye Shaker, but just guessing. And if so, it that neighborhood more patrolled? About OC- Riverview and south of Lorain crime is not as bad as Lakeview. From what I can tell Lakeview is the worst, but the rest of the issues are spead all over esp. Lower Detroit and all along Lorain. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×