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This jackhole is so full of sh!t!

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/10/28/arkansas.anti.gay.resignation/index.html

 

He's sorry he got caught, just like people who cheat.

 

You made comments about "deep-fried twinky eating Rednecks"; that doesn't make you a racist. People read too much into this stuff. Whats with this "gay bullying leading to massive suicides" phenomena? This stuff is way over-hyped, imo. I got my @ss beat and robbed all the time, at school and at the bus stop. Kids would chase after me, follow me into the house and attack me. I had nightmares about it for years but it's all part of growing up and being different or the new kid, unfortunately.

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Teen suicide rates among gays is 4x that of heterosexuals.  I'd say we have a problem that needs addressing and should not be brushed under the rug.

 

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This jackhole is so full of sh!t!

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/10/28/arkansas.anti.gay.resignation/index.html

 

He's sorry he got caught, just like people who cheat.

 

You made comments about "deep-fried twinky eating Rednecks"; that doesn't make you a racist. People read too much into this stuff. Whats with this "gay bullying leading to massive suicides" phenomena? This stuff is way over-hyped, imo. I got my @ss beat and robbed all the time, at school and at the bus stop. Kids would chase after me, follow me into the house and attack me. I had nightmares about it for years but it's all part of growing up and being different or the new kid, unfortunately.

 

WHOOA.

 

When I have called someone a "redneck"?  I've used the term "hillbilly" to describe some, ok, most people in the South, but not Redneck.  No, I'm not a racist, I'm just better than you.

 

You got beat up, that wasn't right, but YOU have no idea what its like to wrestle with your sexuality, during adolescence.

 

As a person who wanted to committ suicide as a Teen there is NOTHING YOU a straight man can say to me, to make me believe that this as "over hyped". 

 

Its in your face and now its "over hyped".  The facts are that GLTB youth commit suicide at rates 3  times greater than there Hetro counterparts.  Bullying, racial, sexual, religious inequalities should be over hyped so that my great nieces/nephews and soon to be born God child can live a better life than I have.

 

You have no idea what its like to be "categorized" and treated "less than" when it comes to love, race, marriage, so how in the hell can you say this is over hyped.

 

Have you ever been in a hospital with the person you love and live with only to be told you cannot see them or make a life and death decision because you're not "family"?

 

Have you ever been in a store and been asked to open your bag, simply based on the color of your skin?

 

Do you know what it's like to write out your own death plan, so that others can know the pain you internalize?

 

When you can answer "yes" to all three of those questions, get back to me.

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Teen suicide rates among gays is 4x that of heterosexuals. I'd say we have a problem that needs addressing and should not be brushed under the rug.

 

 

I wasn't aware of those statistics. My apologies.

 

 

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Gay teen suicide has been a problem which has been overlooked for decades.  It is been swept under the rug completely, even by the parents of the dead teenagers, simply because they don't want people to know their child was gay.  There was, and in some circles still is, a huge social stigma to having a gay child.  Especially among the practicing believers.  I hesitate to call the religious.  It was underreported for years, because of reluctance to admit a child was homosexual.  The parents  acted as though they were protecting the memory, but in reality were absolving themselves from any possible responsibility or blame.  Assuage the guilt.

 

My own experience was horrendous.  My teen  years were filled with problems of fighting homophobia from siblings in additon to school.  I was bullied, beaten, badgered, humiliated, taunted, and despised.  During my years in high school I kept entirely to myself.  I did not have any real friends until senior year, because I was too afraid that someone would "discover" my secret.  There was absolutely no kind of support system, because it was looked at as a mental illness at the time.  I was not flamboyant, but I was definitely different....which did not play well in Columbus in the 70s.  Calling people "queer"  "homo" "fag" etc was perfectly acceptable in my catholic school.  No one raised an eyebrow; even the teachers, many of whom I later learned were gay. 

 

Other friends have equally horrible stories of their youth. Several tried to commit suicide at least once.  I did not...it would have been giving in to them.  I am just too stubborn for that.  I knew it would get better and could see the light at the end of the tunnel. 

 

I don't want to sound overly dramatic, but probably 1/2 the adult gay people I know tried suicide as teens. It is a sad commentary on society in general, and shows how little respect and support there is for diversity.  For gay teens who are of color, it is even tougher. 

 

We all have issues it's true.  This is just one more that can push the person to the brink.  Everyone wants to belong, to be loved, to have friends. 

 

 

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Gay teen suicide has been a problem which has been overlooked for decades.  It is been swept under the rug completely, even by the parents of the dead teenagers, simply because they don't want people to know their child was gay.  There was, and in some circles still is, a huge social stigma to having a gay child.  Especially among the practicing believers.  I hesitate to call the religious.  It was underreported for years, because of reluctance to admit a child was homosexual.  The parents  acted as though they were protecting the memory, but in reality were absolving themselves from any possible responsibility or blame.  Assuage the guilt.

 

My own experience was horrendous.  My teen  years were filled with problems of fighting homophobia from siblings in additon to school.  I was bullied, beaten, badgered, humiliated, taunted, and despised.  During my years in high school I kept entirely to myself.  I did not have any real friends until senior year, because I was too afraid that someone would "discover" my secret.  There was absolutely no kind of support system, because it was looked at as a mental illness at the time.  I was not flamboyant, but I was definitely different....which did not play well in Columbus in the 70s.  Calling people "queer"  "homo" "fag" etc was perfectly acceptable in my catholic school.  No one raised an eyebrow; even the teachers, many of whom I later learned were gay. 

 

Other friends have equally horrible stories of their youth. Several tried to commit suicide at least once.  I did not...it would have been giving in to them.  I am just too stubborn for that.  I knew it would get better and could see the light at the end of the tunnel. 

 

I don't want to sound overly dramatic, but probably 1/2 the adult gay people I know tried suicide as teens. It is a sad commentary on society in general, and shows how little respect and support there is for diversity.  For gay teens who are of color, it is even tougher. 

 

We all have issues it's true.  This is just one more that can push the person to the brink.  Everyone wants to belong, to be loved, to have friends.

 

SFSpike, you hit it on the head, many of us thought we were the "only" one like this.  The reason my I fought with my brother (physically and mentally) is because I was gay.  My brother could not accept having a gay brother and mentally torturing him was my way of evening the playing field, so to speak.

 

In high school I wasn't teased or bullied - to my face.  I used elitism as armor and the kids were too dumb to notice.  I'm sure if I was a smaller guy I would have been picked on.  Most gays in my age range were not flamboyant, especially compared to todays standards. 

 

I think more than half of gay teens want to committ suicide.  about 5/6 years ago I ran into a guy who I went to high school with and suspected was gay, but didn't have any concrete evidence.  He was on the football team, ran track, popular.  I ran into him on Shaker Square.  He told me he just gotten out of the hospital because he's been battling depression and just coming to terms with being gay.  Something he suppressed all his life.  His father, like mine, didn't want to talk about it.  Then he asked me if I was gay.  I told him yes, and he asked me how I dealt with it.  Luckily I can say my family has a "who cares" attitude, with the exception of my fathers brother and sadomasochistic-homophobic cousin.  I recently found out he's has liver cancer and is a functional alcoholic.

 

I can remember my father saying to me, "I dont know why you're like this.  Don't you know you have family all over this city, this will scare my family name." I remember I said to him, "embarrassing for you or your family?"  I don't think I spoke to my father in English for months.  I was so pissed.  I started planning how I could kill myself and was reading books on how to keep my body buoyant so that after death I would just float on horse shoe lake.  I want my parents to be embarrassed and suffer.

 

I dont think straight teens understand the pressure and the dual life you lead just to fit in and be accepted.

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We all have issues it's true.  This is just one more that can push the person to the brink.  Everyone wants to belong, to be loved, to have friends. 

 

Ain't that the truth. I don't think anyone ever stops struggling with that.

 

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We all have issues it's true.  This is just one more that can push the person to the brink.  Everyone wants to belong, to be loved, to have friends. 

 

Ain't that the truth. I don't think anyone ever stops struggling with that.

 

Agreed!

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With the ferocious swing to the right in this last election I am concerned with hard fought civil liberties being swept under the rug.  Republicans are not exactly embracing of diversity, especially in regard to sexual preference.  A bright note is that some of the most outspoken bigots were not elected, but sadly a few of the wackos were.  Only time will tell.

 

 

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The GOP is absolutely no friend of gays and lesbians. It's even more imperative the Democrats stand up with us and maintain the few civil liberties we have.

 

I have been working on getting two non-discrimination ordinances on the ballot in the City of Bowling Green for the last six months, and it looks like both are going to pass. As of midnight, and with the gay-friendly and student-heavy provisional ballots yet to be counted:

 

Ordinance 7905, which protects glbts and others from being denied housing:

 

YES 4104 50.15%

NO 4080 49.85%

 

Ordinance 7906, which is a new law protecting glbts and others from discrimination in employment, public accommodation and public education:

 

YES 4003 49.29%

NO 4119 50.71%

 

but, as I mentioned we still have several hundred (500?) provisional ballots to count for both, which will likely extend our lead for 7905 and put us over the top on 7906.

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^I assume that 7906 is for "public" employment only?

 

With the ferocious swing to the right in this last election I am concerned with hard fought civil liberties being swept under the rug.  Republicans are not exactly embracing of diversity, especially in regard to sexual preference.  A bright note is that some of the most outspoken bigots were not elected, but sadly a few of the wackos were.  Only time will tell.

 

Fear not.  Their position is clear on this issue.  It's a states rights issue.  Each state should decide for themselves.  California 'values' should not pushed on Utah.  That is why they favor the creation of a negative right in the Federal Constitution banning gay marriage.  Wait.....

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Not really a Gay Rights thing, but a sign of progress 'south of the border':

 

Jim Gray Elected Mayor of Lexington

 

Lexington voters turned out incumbent Mayor Jim Newberry on Tuesday, opting for a fresh start with millionaire Jim Gray.

 

Gray, 57, a construction company executive who has been Lexington's vice mayor for four years, defeated Newberry, a 54-year-old lawyer, by a solid margin.

 

He becomes Lexington's first openly gay mayor and the first businessman who has been elected to Lexington's top spot since the city and county merged governments in 1974.

 

...he came out in 2002 when he ran for metro council.  And I think he is the first openly gay male mayor of a larger Southern city (vs, say, small town or college town mayors, which I think there was already, in Carrboro, NC) (and there was already a lesbian mayor of a larger Southern city, in Houston, TX). 

 

Lexington was the first city in KY to pass a gay rights law, too. 

 

 

 

 

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^I assume that 7906 is for "public" employment only?

 

With the ferocious swing to the right in this last election I am concerned with hard fought civil liberties being swept under the rug.  Republicans are not exactly embracing of diversity, especially in regard to sexual preference.  A bright note is that some of the most outspoken bigots were not elected, but sadly a few of the wackos were.  Only time will tell.

 

Fear not.  Their position is clear on this issue.  It's a states rights issue.  Each state should decide for themselves.  California 'values' should not pushed on Utah.  That is why they favor the creation of a negative right in the Federal Constitution banning gay marriage.  Wait.....

 

No, not just for public employment. It would be similar to existing federal and state protections for race, religion, etc. However, as usual, religion is exempt from having to follow any law, but judging by the shitstorm from a few fundy churchies in our fair city, they want everyone to live under their half-blind version of Biblical law. So no, it would cover private employers as well with a few exemptions for religion, 'business necessity', and small biznesses with fewer than 5 employees.

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You can check this out too about BG's ordinances. The comments are indicative of the discourse in our city right now.

BG non-discrimination ordinances appear undecided

Written by By JAN LARSON Sentinel County Editor 

Wednesday, 03 November 2010 06:55

 

An excerpt:

 

The victory party was short lived Tuesday night for the opposition to the anti-discrimination ordinances in Bowling Green.

 

While the initial “100 percent” of the votes on the Wood County Board of Elections’ Web site showed both ordinances being handily rejected by voters, those results were changed around 11 p.m. when early paper ballot numbers were added in.

 

Elation dissolved into suspicion for Crystal Thompson, spokesperson for the group opposed to the ordinances

 

“It sounds a little crooked to me,” she said when the updated results showed one ordinance passing and the other very narrowly losing.

 

http://sent-trib.com/trib/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=21788:bg-non-discrimination-ordinances-appear-undecided&catid=1:fp&Itemid=115

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Not really a Gay Rights thing, but a sign of progress 'south of the border':

 

Jim Gray Elected Mayor of Lexington

 

Lexington voters turned out incumbent Mayor Jim Newberry on Tuesday, opting for a fresh start with millionaire Jim Gray.

 

Gray, 57, a construction company executive who has been Lexington's vice mayor for four years, defeated Newberry, a 54-year-old lawyer, by a solid margin.

 

He becomes Lexington's first openly gay mayor and the first businessman who has been elected to Lexington's top spot since the city and county merged governments in 1974.

 

...he came out in 2002 when he ran for metro council. And I think he is the first openly gay male mayor of a larger Southern city (vs, say, small town or college town mayors, which I think there was already, in Carrboro, NC) (and there was already a lesbian mayor of a larger Southern city, in Houston, TX).

 

Lexington was the first city in KY to pass a gay rights law, too.

 

 

 

My brother-in-law's mother is councilwoman Dianne Lawless and she is a major gay rights supporter.  She probably had something to do with that law.

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Senate votes to repeal 'don't ask, don't tell'

The 65-31 vote means gays and lesbians will be able to serve openly in the military without punishment after President Obama signs the bill.

By Lisa Mascaro and Michael Muskal

December 18, 2010, 1:01 p.m.

 

Reporting from Washington and Los Angeles — The Senate voted to allow gays and lesbians to serve openly in the military, approving a bill that repeals the policy of "don't ask, don't tell" on Saturday.

 

The 65-31 vote came after an earlier procedural vote that brought the milestone in gay rights to the Senate floor. It also fulfilled a campaign promise by President Obama, who has been under attack from liberals in his own party for seeking compromises with Republicans on economic and tax issues during the lame-duck congressional session.

 

The White House said Obama will sign the measure into law next week. Repeal means that gays and lesbians can openly serve without fear of punishment. More than 13,500 people have been dismissed from the military since the 1993 law went into effect.

 

Read More...

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The way the media have worded discussion about DADT has led a lot of people to believe that gays were banned from the military only since 1993, and that's not an accurate perception. During the McCarthy-era witch-hunts of the 1950s homosexuals were said to be a great threat to the security of the United States because of their vulnerability to compromise and blackmail, and gay men in the armed forces as well as in critical or influential civilian positions were hunted down and denounced. I remember ongoing witch hunts during my USAF service 1962-1966, and during that time, being found out gay often carried harsher penalties than being convicted of a felony by civilian authorities. An individual sentenced to jail time for armed robbery by a civilian court usually received a general discharge, whereas someone found out to be gay was discharged "under other than honorable conditions."

 

During the Vietnam era compulsory military service (the draft) was still in effect. Part of the induction process along with the physical exam was a questionnaire, and one of the questions concerned whether or not you had ever had a homosexual experience. Some heterosexual men chose to answer "yes" to that question to avoid being drafted, and some were investigated to find out if they were, in fact, straight (irony?). That situation was the plot for a hilarious movie of that era, "The Gay Deceivers."

 

Part of Bill Clinton's presidential campaign platform was the elimination of the armed forces' ban on gay men and lesbians entering military service. He met strong opposition, most notably from Democratic Senator Sam Nunn, and DADT was the compromise that was reached; the military would not pry into individuals' orientation and they could enlist and serve so long as they didn't make it known that they were gay.

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^I don't think the media has been painting as gays were only banned from serving in the military since 1993, I think most news organizations have clearly stated that gays are not allowed to serve openly. I don't think they are mentioning the past policies on gays in the military because we are passed that point and we have matured as a nation (for the most part), and by that I mean we can all recognize that gays shouldn't be hunted down simply for being gay.

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I still don't know why the Dem congress and Dem pres put DADT into law.

 

As with most issues, I agree with Mr. Conservative himself (Barry Goldwater) on this one: "You don't have to be straight to be in the military; you just have to be able to shoot straight."

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Was great seeing both Ohio senators on the right side of this one.

 

You mean the left side.

 

I still don't know why the Dem congress and Dem pres put DADT into law.

 

Time for another history lesson Scrabble won't read.  But just in case any of you are as confused as he is (unlikely):

 

Prior to 1993 (due to a 1982 absolute ban) there were literally witch hunts in the military for gays serving our country.  The military leaders were required to seek out and discharge any and all gay service members (although in practice, this was only done to gay men).  Clinton campaigned in 1992 on a promise to end that practice and allow gays to serve in the military.

 

However, when Clinton won the election and took office in 1993, certain social conservatives (both Dixiecrats and Republicans) nearly shat themselves at the thought of allowing gays to serve in the military.  They immediately passed a moratorium on any changes to military policy and instilled the commonly used delay tactic of forming a committee to examine the issue.  This gave the evangelical effort to ramp up, really putting this issue squarely in the public's sight.  Of course, 1993 and present times are VERY different in terms of tolerance of gay people.  Congressional phone lines were flooded.  DADT was reached as a compromise, to allow gays to serve in the military as long as they did not do so openly.  According to Clinton advisors at the time, it was supposed to be more of a passive law and they never intended it to be enforced so vigorously.

 

Some congressional members foresaw the problems it created and fought it.  But, as is commonly done, the measure was placed in the bill which funds the military for the following fiscal year (the National Defense Authorization Fund Act.... or something like that).  Therefore, by voting against it, you would be voting against funding our troop.  1994 was a mid-term election year.

 

One last ditch effort was made to pull the DADT language out of an Act it shouldn't have been included in to begin with.  An Amendment was proposed to eliminate the language.  The voting was as follows - 156 Democrats and 11 Republicans voting in favor of the amendment, with 101 Democrats and 163 Republicans defeating it.  The Republicans who voted in favor of the Amendment were from Wisconsin, NY (2), Mass., Maryland, Iowa (2), Conn. (2), California (2).  The Democrats voting against the Amendment were overwhelmingly from present day red states, such as Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, etc.  Ohio's voting breakdown was fairly representative of the rest of the nation:

 

Ohio

No OH-1 Mann, David [D]

No OH-2 Portman, Robert [R]

No OH-3 Hall, Tony [D]

No OH-4 Oxley, Michael [R]

No OH-5 Gillmor, Paul [R]

Aye OH-6 Strickland, Ted [D]

No OH-7 Hobson, David [R]

No OH-8 Boehner, John [R]

No OH-9 Kaptur, Marcy [D]

No OH-10 Hoke, Martin [R]

Aye OH-11 Stokes, Louis [D]

No OH-12 Kasich, John [R]

Aye OH-13 Brown, Sherrod [D]

Aye OH-14 Sawyer, Thomas [D]

No OH-15 Pryce, Deborah [R]

No OH-16 Regula, Ralph [R]

No OH-17 Traficant, James [D]

Aye OH-18 Applegate, Douglas [D]

Aye OH-19 Fingerhut, Eric [D]

 

David Mann was the former mayor of Cincinnati.

Tony Hall was a born again christian whose father was the Republican mayor of Dayton.

Marcy Kaptur is catholic.

James Trafficant is a nut.... and a felon.  At present, he is a big fan of the Tea Party

 

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Moments ago, the Senate voted to end "Don't Ask, Don't Tell."

 

When that bill reaches my desk, I will sign it, and this discriminatory law will be repealed.

 

Gay and lesbian service members -- brave Americans who enable our freedoms -- will no longer have to hide who they are.

 

The fight for civil rights, a struggle that continues, will no longer include this one.

 

This victory belongs to you. Without your commitment, the promise I made as a candidate would have remained just that.

 

Instead, you helped prove again that no one should underestimate this movement. Every phone call to a senator on the fence, every letter to the editor in a local paper, and every message in a congressional inbox makes it clear to those who would stand in the way of justice: We will not quit.

 

This victory also belongs to Senator Harry Reid, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and our many allies in Congress who refused to let politics get in the way of what was right.

 

Like you, they never gave up, and I want them to know how grateful we are for that commitment.

 

Will you join me in thanking them by adding your name to Organizing for America's letter?

 

I will make sure these messages are delivered -- you can also add a comment about what the repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" means to you.

 

As Commander in Chief, I fought to repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" because it weakens our national security and military readiness. It violates the fundamental American principles of equality and fairness.

 

But this victory is also personal.

 

I will never know what it feels like to be discriminated against because of my sexual orientation.

 

But I know my story would not be possible without the sacrifice and struggle of those who came before me -- many I will never meet, and can never thank.

 

I know this repeal is a crucial step for civil rights, and that it strengthens our military and national security. I know it is the right thing to do.

 

But the rightness of our cause does not guarantee success, and today, celebration of this historic step forward is tempered by the defeat of another -- the DREAM Act. I am incredibly disappointed that a minority of senators refused to move forward on this important, commonsense reform that most Americans understand is the right thing for our country. On this issue, our work must continue.

 

Today, I'm proud that we took these fights on.

 

Please join me in thanking those in Congress who helped make "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" repeal possible:

 

http://my.barackobama.com/Repealed

 

Thank you,

 

Barack

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An excellent article delving into the source of objections to repeal of DADT:

 

Repeal Of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Paves Way For Gay Sex Right On Battlefield, Opponents Fantasize

 

July 12, 2010 | ISSUE 46•28

 

WASHINGTON—As Congress prepares to allow gay individuals to serve openly in the military, those against the proposed change voiced their concerns Monday, warning the repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" could soon lead to strong, strapping American soldiers engaging in mind-blowing homosexual intercourse right on the battlefield.

 

More at:

http://www.theonion.com/articles/repeal-of-dont-ask-dont-tell-paves-way-for-gay-sex,17698/

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I suppose they overlook the fact that repeal of DADT in no way entitles a soldier to give a blow job while on duty or engage in any other ACTIVITY while on duty.  Or really any other activity while on a military base.

 

[not intended to be serious-sounding.... sort of]

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An excellent article delving into the source of objections to repeal of DADT:

 

Repeal Of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Paves Way For Gay Sex Right On Battlefield, Opponents Fantasize

 

July 12, 2010 | ISSUE 46•28

 

WASHINGTON—As Congress prepares to allow gay individuals to serve openly in the military, those against the proposed change voiced their concerns Monday, warning the repeal of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" could soon lead to strong, strapping American soldiers engaging in mind-blowing homosexual intercourse right on the battlefield.

 

More at:

http://www.theonion.com/articles/repeal-of-dont-ask-dont-tell-paves-way-for-gay-sex,17698/

A friend of mine who was a combat-veteran said his first gay experience (but by no means his last) was with another soldier in a foxhole during incoming mortar fire. He said there really wasn't anything they could do about the incoming, and he might not get another chance at the other thing.  :-D

 

I suppose they overlook the fact that repeal of DADT in no way entitles a soldier to give a blow job while on duty or engage in any other ACTIVITY while on duty.

Well, Hell! That changes my mind about wanting to see if I could re-enlist! :cry:

 

 

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