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Clayton / Englewood: Development and News

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Take that Springboro!

 

For those unfamiliar, Clayton is the hardest Dayton suburb to find, but the easiest to stumble into. When traveling in the northwest area of the metro, - in the Englewood area, "Welcome to Clayton" signs appear out of nowhere, followed only a few blocks later by signs indicating you have re-entered Englewood. I the rural environs, the same thing will occur. Clayton seems to be more of an idea than an actual geographic place, and to an extent, that's true. The actual village of Clayton sits at the intersection of Diamond Mill and Wenger  roads, a couple miles west of Englewood. Not much more than a collection of houses, a ball field, and a post office. In 96 or 97, Clayton managed to annex the entirety of Randolph township, excluding Englewood and Union. The result is a city with serpentine borders only a gerrymandering expert could love.

 

Looks like Clayton wants to be a real city now :)

 

 

 

Clayton officials working on developing town center

Group taking field trip to Carmel, Ind., to get ideas

By Derek Ali

Dayton Daily News

 

CLAYTON | Tucked away somewhere close to his heart is a vision Mayor Ted Gudorf's been carrying since before he ran for mayor in 1997.

 

"One of the ideas I had was to develop a new town center for the city of Clayton," Gudorf said. "That was before the election. I talked about that idea, that vision, in my initial campaign for mayor."

 

After winning the mayoral election, a land-use committee of about 25 citizens included the town center concept in their designs for the city.

 

Read More...

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WHAT! Clayton...wanting a downtown? Hell, if Missouri's can have one, might as well ;)

 

Oh, and peace to Derek Ali. Truly a remarkable man.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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The city didn't really grow from 25,000 to 75,000 did it? I thought it just merged with Randolph township, like Riverside did with Mad River Twp. and Trotwood with Madison Twp.

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The city didn't really grow from 25' date='000 to 75,000 did it? I thought it just merged with Randolph township, like Riverside did with Mad River Twp. and Trotwood with Madison Twp.[/quote']

That was Carmel, IN. I don't know where they get 75,000 though. In 2000 it was only 38,000 and the 2003 estimate is 43,000.

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^ LOL, that's what I get for trying to skim through the article at work!

 

I don't know if Carmel has 75,000 people, but it is booming like crazy along with Fishers, IN. That area of Indiana reminds me of Delaware County, Ohio.

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The city didn't really grow from 25' date='000 to 75,000 did it? I thought it just merged with Randolph township, like Riverside did with Mad River Twp. and Trotwood with Madison Twp.[/quote']

 

 

Yes, the population did jump to about 75,000. Randolph Twp was quite a developed area at the time. When a city merges with a township, it's basically just annexing the entire township. So it takes the township's land, it's government, it's infrastructure, and yes, even it's population count. Those townships are no more. Trotwood, Riverside and Clayton have all tripled their population by forming mergers with the surronding townships.

 

On a side note, this is also why Dayton's metro population jumped to 1.2 mil form just over 900,000 in the last 5 years. Township populations do not count towards the metro census.

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Yeah Ronnie you are incorrect in that thinking. Townships are counted.

 

Springboro isn't though because it is in Warren County and all of Warren County counts towards Cincinnati's numbers.

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The city didn't really grow from 25' date='000 to 75,000 did it? I thought it just merged with Randolph township, like Riverside did with Mad River Twp. and Trotwood with Madison Twp.[/quote']

 

 

Yes, the population did jump to about 75,000. Randolph Twp was quite a developed area at the time. When a city merges with a township, it's basically just annexing the entire township. So it takes the township's land, it's government, it's infrastructure, and yes, even it's population count.

 

Even if that were true, my point was that the area didn't all of a sudden build say 30,000 new homes and gain 50,000 new residents who needed huge amounts of new infastructure (schools, police, roads, etc.). I grew up in Mad River Twp. (which had more than 20 times the population of the Village of Riverside) and I know that the old Village of Riverside didn't provide any services to its citizens. Before the merger occured (January 1, 1994) Mad River Twp. provided all public services (police, fire, schools, etc) to both township and village residents. The merger technically increased Riverside's population from 1,000 to 29,000 but the level of public services needed for the area didn't change one bit.

 

Bascially I just have a problem with the article comparing Carmel's "real" population growth, with Clayton's population growth by annexation.

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There was a big political stink about the Randolph Township/Clayton merger.

 

Clayton proper is one of those neat little rural villiages you find in Western Montgomery County(like Pyrmont or Farmersville)...but I think it was Randolph Township people who didnt want to be annexed by Englewood that intiated the merger with Clayton.

 

The funny thing about Clayton villiage, is that is really isnt that urbanized...from what I recall its still pretty much surrounded by farmland, or those large lot minifarms & ribbon developement...most of the developement in the former Randolph Township is just urban sprawl more to the east & south of Clayton proper...tho not as intense as the south suburbs of Dayton.

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:clap:

 

Clayton plans Towne Center

Residents would walk or bike to activities, services

By Chuck Smith

For the DaytonDailyNews

 

CLAYTON | The Clayton City Council wants to create a European village in the corn fields across National Road from Northmont High School.

 

The new Towne Center will be an alternative to the typical auto-centered development, as the estimated 1,500 to 2,500 residents will be able to walk or ride bicycles to most shops, restaurants and services.

 

The council Dec. 2 approved a preliminary plan for a $125 million mixed-use development on 145 acres of farmland north of U.S. 40 (National Road) and west of Haber Road.

 

Read More...

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I guess it's better than sprawl. Apparently the developers couldn't find a large enough vacant or underutilized parcel in the city of Dayton, before proposing to wipe out another productive farm at the outskirts?

 

Let's see.... global population rises from 1.5 billion in 1900 to 6 billion just 100 years later, so let's replicate old cities on top of the most productive farmland in the world while our original cities lie fallow. Makes sense to me.

 

KJP


"Nearly every problem that we have in the USA -- unaffordable health care, prison overpopulation, hyper militarization, climate change, racism, gun violence, poverty, poor education, urban sprawl and others -- cannot be positively addressed because bribery and conflicts of interest are legal under campaign finance laws which protect the uber-wealthy and the narrow self-interests who grossly benefit from our afflictions."

 

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They want to use geothermal energy?  Would this come from our underutilized Ohio volcanoes? :?

 

Anyway, the alternative to this thing surely is some horrible sprawling place either there or somewhere else in the area, so it sounds nice to me.

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I guess it's better than sprawl. Apparently the developers couldn't find a large enough vacant or underutilized parcel in the city of Dayton, before proposing to wipe out another productive farm at the outskirts?

 

Your point is well taken, but since this involves the city of Clayton, it seems doubtful that they would choose to site this project in Dayton.

 

I don't know how familiar you are with that area, but Clayton was formed in 1997 from the rump of Randolph Township not already claimed by the cities of Union & Englewood. It consists of the original Clayton village west of Englewood and a swath of residual sprwal between Englewood & Trotwood. The rest is rural. That being the case, Clayton does not have a CBD. It seems they intend to create one, and I'm glad they're choosing this model. Perhaps I'm naive, but if Clayton is successful, I wonder if it might have some influence in curbing the march of sprawl to the south.

 

 

They want to use geothermal energy? Would this come from our underutilized Ohio volcanoes? :?

 

 

I know a few people with houses that use this. It uses underground water, which I believe is a constant 50-some degrees year-round, which is pumped through a heat exchanger in the house's HVAC unit. Thus in the winter, the heater is only making up the difference between 50 degrees and room temperature, rather than the full spread between the outside air temp and room temp. Cooling on the summer is done the same way in reverse. It's used as a natural boost for conventional systems.

 

 

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Well, it's Clayton.  Good for them.  Atleast SOMEBODY is doing it *cough at Bellbrook*


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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It seems most of "Clayton" is farmland and ribbon developement along country roads, with very few subdivisions.  And the orginal villiage of Clayton.

 

Clayton Villiage.  Does it have a downtown?

 

I was wondering if there would be an opportunity to do a "new urbanist" type of developement around the orginal villiage, similar to the way developement occurs in Europe. 

 

I would be interested to see more details of what they are proposing.  This could be pretty innovative for the Dayton area.  Or it could be sprawl in new urbanist drag.

 

 

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The "downtown" Clayton I guess would be that small mass of streets on the first pic.  I should've provided another map to show Clayton's cul-de-sac-ness, because the one I showed only shows the parts of Clayton that are mostly farms.

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Click on the aerial link in my above post, then magnify the southeastern section. The crapload of sprawly streets & lots outlined in yellow are part of Clayton too.

 

Clayton village is kind of spread out and faces all directions. You'd almost have to level it and start over.

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Haven't heard much about this in a while. From the 8/12/05 Dayton Business Journal:

 

 

Clayton approves development plans

John Wilfong

DBJ Staff Reporter

 

Clayton city officials gave the go-ahead Wednesday evening to begin work on what will be the city's largest commercial and residential development -- the Clayton Towne Center.

 

Clayton City Council members unanimously voted to approve plans for the first section of phase one of the Clayton Towne Center, a 1,200-acre, 3,000-house development that also will include retail, churches and schools.

 

Clayton Mayor Ted Gudorf said section one includes 35 single-family homes, two townhouse sections, three park areas and four mixed-use residential/office buildings called work-life units, two of which already are sold. The section, just off U.S. Route 40 near Hoke Road, also will include 1.4 acres where the city will build a civic center, he said.

 

Read More...

 

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A story with a couple more details from the 8/16/05 Dayton Daily News:

 

 

Clayton ready to begin work on Towne Center

City envisions $750M to be invested in project

By Ryan Justin Fox

Dayton Daily News

 

CLAYTON | A unique European village-styled "towne center" that will be the centerpiece of an emerging city will arise from Clayton farmland.

 

Today's noon groundbreaking of Clayton's planned Towne Center will set into motion a mixed-used development featuring high-end residential units with unusual commercial enterprises.

 

"The city council and mayor have been working on this for close to 10 years, to finally see that come into fruition is a big deal," Clayton City Manager Dave Rowlands said.

 

Read More...

 

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From the 12/15/05 Dayton Business Journal:

 

 

Clayton development moving forward

 

The developers of The Village of North Clayton, a "new urban" community in Clayton, took their next step by acquiring 56 acres of land at Hoke Road and U.S. 40, just off Interstate 70.

 

The $1.1 million purchase, which closed Wednesday, will lead the way for the development of 500 homes, apartments, shops, civic buildings and parks.

 

The Village of North Clayton will be based on new urbanism design principles of a diverse, walkable, mixed-used community that combines the way neighborhoods were developed in the early 20th century with the lifestyle of contemporary residents. The project will take five to 10 years to build and include more than 100 acres.

 

Read More...

 

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From the 12/29/05 Dayton Daily News:

 

 

Village of North Clayton a step closer

56 acres purchased for private planned development

By Ryan Justin Fox

Dayton Daily News

 

CLAYTON | The purchase of the Davis family property and a key piece of land for the next development frontier in Clayton was finalized Dec. 15.

 

What is now a 56-acre tract of farmland situated in the ripe area at West National and Hoke roads was sold for $1.1 million dollars to become part of a private planned development called the Village of North Clayton.

 

The Village of North Clayton is an ambitious plan to bring a new type of urban development that mixes pedestrian-friendly residential areas with a diverse blend of commercial properties to the Clayton area.

 

Read More...

 

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From the 3/23/06 Dayton Daily News:

 

 

Towne Center construction set to begin

Developers expected to start building homes for first neighborhood in May

By Ryan Justin Fox

Dayton Daily News

 

CLAYTON | Clayton's residential makeup is going futuristic in a traditional way.

 

The home developers for the planned Village of North Clayton have selected their desired lots and will soon begin construction of the environmentally forward homes that will characterize the development.

 

"Things with the Towne Center project are very positive and at the end of the day, the residents of Clayton will be proud of the development," City Manager Dave Rowlands said.

 

Read More...

 

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From the 4/12/06 Dayton Daily News:

 

 

Fitness center coming to Clayton

By Ryan Justin Fox

Staff Writer

 

CLAYTON | The future residents of the Village of North Clayton will have a $15 million sports and fitness arena in the middle of the neighborhood.

 

Today: City leaders and the village's developers will announce a deal to construct the Clayton Proaction Arena and Lifestyle Medical Center.

 

What: When completed, the 180,000 square-foot complex will host youth sports events and house cutting-edge preventive medical practices.

 

Where: The fitness center will anchor the Village of North Clayton development being built off West National Road near Hoke Road.

 

"It's a great piece to the puzzle," said Village of North Clayton developer Dave Williams.

 

Read More...

 

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Are their any concrete plans yet? i still haven't seena site map, or any renderings of what this "town center" will look like. Or should i say "Towne Center"... :-D

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From the 4/28/06 Dayton Daily News:

 

 

Group drops challenge to North Clayton deal

Clayton voters still will see referendum on the ballot, but votes on it will not be tabulated.

By Ryan Justin Fox

Staff Writer

 

CLAYTON | Citizens here will not get a chance to vote on the controversial referendum challenging the Village of North Clayton development.

 

Issue 7, which asks voters if they want to overturn the ordinance that rezoned nine acres zoned residential along West National and Hoke roads for business development, will appear on the May 2 ballot, but votes on that issue will not be tabulated, said Betty Smith, Montgomery County Board of Elections deputy director. Signs will be posted at poll locations informing voters that the tally for Issue 7 will not be counted, Smith said.

 

"The removal of Issue 7 from the ballot is a win-win for all parties," Clayton Mayor Joyce Deitering said in a statement released Wednesday.

 

Read More...

 

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Sweet: Esther Price to open fifth candy store

Dayton Business Journal - October 13, 2006

by Tim Tresslar

 

Esther Price Candies Corp. has plans to sweeten up Clayton.

 

The Dayton-based maker and seller of chocolates and sweets has agreed to buy three-quarters of an acre and an accompanying farmhouse located in the Village of North Clayton, where it will locate a store.

 

The Village is a 100-acre development at the northwest corner of National and Hoke roads. The proposed development will include retail and offices, homes and condominiums.

 

Read More...

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From the 1/25/07 Englewood Independent:

 

 

Council gives go-ahead to Section Two of Village of North Clayton

BY MARILYN McCONAHAY

Independent Staff Writer

[email protected]

 

Following a public hearing at the beginning of its Jan. 18 meeting, Clayton City Council approved plans for Section Two of the Village of North Clayton, which emphasizes retail and office development.

 

The planned development-3 Business final Development Plan affects 7.9 acres located on the south side of National Road beginning at the intersection of Anneliese Way and National Road, and ending 1,300 feet from the intersection of Hoke Road at Lofton Drive.

 

The Clayton Planning Commission met on Jan.9 and recommended approval of the plan, filed by North Clayton Development LLC and Neil and Jeanne Hazel.

 

Read More...

 

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I think there is already a thread on this somewhere, but here are some pix of development at this North Clayton Village just west of Englewood, north Dayton suburbs.

 

If even just a part of this is built it will be a nice developlment.  What the renderings show is something that will be nicer than The Greene (though not as big), where they actually indtegrate a shopping center into the residential development.

 

NClay1.jpg

 

NClay2.jpg

 

This is the area that is being developed, around a little park with a small fountain in it.

 

NClay3.jpg

 

NClay4.jpg

 

Overall site plan

 

NClay5.jpg

 

Road to the proposed town square

 

NClay6.jpg

 

renderings from the developers website for the town square.  We can only hope it turns out this picturesque....

 

NClay7.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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Hmmm...I suppose for Clayton, it isn't bad.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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What is this...a new development with at least some kind of character/charm?!!?!?  I would much rather see this than the typical suburban crap that usually graces our landscapes!  Oh btw, this looks MUCH better than The Greene...obviously not the same scale, but its not for the same purpose either...this is more of a town square/main street type thing...whereas The Greene is a glorified shopping mall/center.

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While I would love to see only urban infill and redevelopment this is MUCH better than what we have been getting in suburbia over the last 30 years. As long as we continue to build suburbia, I hope we building more of this (that includes the Greene over typical strip centers) and less of the other crap.

 

I know I have said this before, but why can developers all over the US (heck that includes places like Lubbock, TX) build these types of projects and yet Cincy's suburbia has NONE. We are still building as if it was the 70s and 80s. Until Cincy developers and communities start embrace more Smart Growth concepts, its going to be a hard sell convincing them to embrace greater density and mass transit.

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Yeah, it's looking good so far.  I don't have my camera (*cough* Rich has it *cough*) but if I did, I'd take photos of it.  Or not.


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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