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zaceman

Cleveland: Downtown: The Beacon / 515 Euclid Avenue

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Looking up, earlier today 

20181025_170640.jpg


"Fascism begins the moment a ruling class, fearing the people may use their political democracy to gain economic democracy, begins to destroy political democracy in order to retain its power of exploitation and special privilege." -- Tommy Douglas, Scottish-born Canadian Baptist minister and the seventh Premier of Saskatchewan

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Another great shot! This one is the first “reality shot” matching Stark’s promotional rendering of The Beacon in context of the neighborhood on Euclid.  

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20 minutes ago, tastybunns said:

I know, I'm talking about the darker stuff on the eastern side

 

You mean where the construction elevator is attached? No, that area doesn't even have the yellow insulated panels installed yet. Many of the floors just have plywood to keep out the weather. The cladding won't be installed here until the elevator comes down. There are closer pics posted upthread.

 

 

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Just now, CLE_Millennial said:

It's sad seeing this crane being taken down... But progress must continue on!

 

 

It just means we're one step closer to getting people living in the building!!!  ?

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I'm anxious to see how they will apply the final metal cladding. I think the color and tonal graduation, moving from darker on the lower levels to lighter at the top will create a sense of vertical movement and make the building look taller.

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That’s the exact idea with the design of the facade.  I think this will be a building, much like the Hilton, where once completed, we’ll hear people saying, “it looks even better than I expected..”  I’m also looking forward to how it will look at night, as it supposedly will be very well illuminated and have that multi story “The Beacon” lettering at the top. 

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The night illumination and the dark-to-light graduation of the facade will grab the eye of pedestrians on the ground and pull them skyward, giving the illusion of a taller structure. From a distant skyline vantage point the draduated cladding should appear to shimmer, acting as a visual "Beacon" on the skyline. This is just excellent architecture!

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 Although the 29 story building doesn’t make a big statement vertically - obviously it effectively fills a gap as many have previously noted - but today I began to appreciate how one new tower of its size can really help add density and the feeling of depth in the skyline.  I had a good  view of downtown from the top of the hill on State Road in Parma and could easily see the yellow Beacon, now in the foreground of Erieview Tower.  The latter building was no longer fully visible from that perspective.  The city seemed to already have a slightly more complex, bigger city feel because of the depth perceived from that particular view. I’m sure there are any number of skyline perspectives that will be nicely enhanced by the Beacon’s presence.  The shimmering effect of the lighting mentioned by ArtmasterCLE might make that especially true at night. 

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^Agree 100%, the view of it from the 490 bridge changes the skyline entirely. The Lumen will add some width as well, and two average sized towers will completely change the skyline. 

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I totally agree with CleveFan an YAB0713's observation of The Beacon's contextual impact on the skyline. What excites me is the awesome effect the undulating graduation of the metal cladding will have on the completed building. What NADAAA Architects has done is to take a basic rectangular structure and, through innovative use of colored metal panels and textural variation, created a truly iconic building that sets a tone of design excellence and holds its own against much taller neighboring buildings.

 

Kudos to Bob Stark for refusing to accept mediocrity.

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