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Borden had originally planned to consolidate its headquarters in offices it owns outside of downtown, I believe in Easton.

 

Borden to join other firms, form Hexion

By Tom Matthews THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Borden Chemical soon will be known as Hexion Specialty Chemicals.

 

The industrial-resins company said yesterday that it will merge by June 30 with two Houston chemical companies and complete its previously announced acquisition of the German company Bakelite AG.

 

More at http://www.dispatch.com

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The company will more than double its sales and employees and will retain its Downtown headquarters

 

that's the key aspect to it!

 

 

now everyone save your elsie the cow memorabila, it could be worth a few dollars on ebay in the future :lol:

no, wait...don't do that, just save a package of cheese.

actaully, don't do that either

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From the AP, 7/14/05:

 

Slower sales of baskets result in more layoffs at Longaberger

The Associated Press

 

NEWARK, Ohio - The Longaberger Co. said on Wednesday that it will lay off about 450 workers, mostly from its manufacturing division, because of excess inventory at the nation's largest handmade basket maker.  The company said it hopes to bring back many of the 383 laid-off manufacturing workers either late this year or early next year when the company's inventory is expected to decrease because of holiday buying.

 

The job cuts are the second round this year, with Longaberger laying off 360 workers in April.  The company has eliminated more than 4,000 jobs since 2000, when it employed about 8,300 people.

 

Newark-based Longaberger, founded in 1973, sells handmade baskets, pottery and other home products through 70,000 individual consultants.

 

MORE: http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050714/BIZ/507140311/1076/rss01

 

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The company has eliminated more than 4,000 jobs since 2000, when it employed about 8,300 people.

Wow.

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This info was pulled from the OhioHealth/Dublin thread.  From the 8/1/05 Columbus Business First:

 

 

...

Brian R. Ball

Business First

 

OhioHealth Corp. is planning to move its back-office and billing operations from Columbus to suburban Dublin next year, while Safe Auto Insurance Co. considers skipping out of its Whitehall headquarters for planned offices at Easton.

 

...

 

Safe Auto move

 

Safe Auto, meanwhile, is weighing its options for consolidating its headquarters and other offices.  It is considering a proposed 120,000-square-foot building at Easton in Columbus or moving those operations to Phoenix.  The insurer operates from a company-owned 47,500-square-foot campus in Whitehall, which houses its corporate offices and a sales and customer service call center.  Safe Auto also leases 25,000 square feet on East Fifth Avenue in Columbus, where it runs a claims center and owns a 9,760-square-foot call center in Monroe County in eastern Ohio.

 

Full Story:  http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2005/08/01/story2.html?from_rss=1

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Easton is the heart and soul of Ohio!

 

How can any shopping center be the heart and soul of anything (or place)?

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Easton is the heart and soul of Ohio!

 

How can any shopping center be the heart and soul of anything (or place)?

 

Because it has a Cheesecake Factory.

 

Also it has pedestrian traffic not seen since the downtowns of yore.

 

When future archeologists sift through the ruins of Ohio, they will note that Easton was the peak of our civilization.

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From the 9/21/05 Newark Advocate:

 

Longaberger hires back 235

Work force still down from '04

By JASON MAIN

Advocate Reporter

 

NEWARK -- Strong sales and a draw-down of its inventory prompted The Longaberger Co. to put more than 200 of its laid-off employees back to work.

 

Longaberger plans to bring back 195 full-time employees, including 160 basket makers and 35 manufacturing support employees, to its Frazeysburg manufacturing facility starting Monday. The company will bring back another 40 basket makers for three months between mid-October and mid-January in order to produce enough baskets during the holiday season, traditionally the company's strongest time of year for sales.

 

The company laid off 784 workers in September 2004 and cut 449 jobs in July, dropping its total work force to about 3,000 people, about one-third of its seasonal peak of 8,272 in 2000.

 

MORE: http://www.centralohio.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/BF/20050921/NEWS01/509210304/1002&template=BF

 

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I hope they have that building of theirs paid for--it doesn't lend itself too well to other industries!   ;)

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I hope they have that building of theirs paid for--it doesn't lend itself too well to other industries!   ;)

 

From what I have heard, Longaberger wanted to build the HQ in Zanesville since ALL of their facilities are in Muskingum County, but the city officials decided that they didn't want a 7 story basket to deal with if Longaberger went under. Bad decision if you ask me!

Anyway, glad to see that my counties largest employer is hiring more jobs.

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Complete and utter bullsh!t. Now someone can lose their LIVELIHOOD because they make the choice to smoke? Sorry, I'm not on board with this one. From the AP, 12/12/05:

 

 

Company demands workers quit smoking to keep jobs

Associated Press

 

MARYSVILLE, Ohio - Scotts Miracle-Gro Co., looking for ways to hold down health insurance costs, will require workers who smoke to quit by October or lose their jobs.

 

Scotts is joining other companies focusing on smokers to cut health insurance costs. Some employers make smokers pay higher insurance premiums or don't hire them.

 

The lawn and garden company wants workers to live healthy lifestyles, said James Hagedorn, the company's chairman and chief executive. "Why would we admit someone into this environment when they're passing risk along to everyone else? Our view is we shouldn't, and we won't," Hagedorn said.

 

Read More...

 

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From Business First of Columbus, 1/2/06:

 

 

High hopes obscure challenges facing TechColumbus

Dan Eaton

Business First

 

TechColumbus is taking a long-term view as the organization gets off the ground, but 2006 will be the year it sets the foundation for what it sees as Central Ohio's high-tech future.

 

TechColumbus, formed from the consolidation of several tech-centric groups in the city, is charged with solidifying a regional strategy for tech economic development and corraling state money to attract talent and investment...

 

FULL ARTICLE: http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2006/01/02/story6.html

 

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Growth hits brakes in 7-county region

Employment figures reflected in decrease in population gain

Sunday, January 08, 2006

Debbie Gebolys

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH 

 

Central Ohio’s growth spurt is showing signs of sputtering.  Population estimates from the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission for the new year show that the seven-county region will continue to add residents.  But trends point to a slowdown, said MORPC data manager Nancy Reger.  "There’s only so long that a growth spurt can continue when you don’t have the weather or the mountains or the ocean," Reger said.  "I assume we’re beyond the cusp. . . . The curve is flatter now than it was before 2000."

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/01/08/20060108-B1-01.html

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So is Greater Cinci the high growth region of Ohio, now?  I think we will all rotate turns from now on.  Maybe even Youngstown will get it's decade again.  Or not.

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Dominion Homes lays off employees as sales drop 41%

By Mike Pramik

The Columbus Dispatch

Friday, January 13, 2006 3:31 PM

 

Dominion Homes sales slipped by 41 percent last quarter, forcing the Dublin homebuilder to lay off a number of employees in its construction and financial-services divisions.  In addition to letting go 15 employees since the beginning of the month, Dominion has sold an undisclosed amount of its land holdings and has discounted a number of its houses.  Overall employment is down 10 percent since July, said Lori Steiner, senior vice president.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=159722

 

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good. the less of those crappy cookie cutter burb homes the better. maybe m/i will follow suit.

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Dominion Homes hires new chief financial officer

By Mike Pramik

The Columbus Dispatch

Tuesday, January 17, 2006 2:15 PM

 

Dominion Homes has hired a veteran certified public accountant as its new chief financial officer, whose tasks will include reinforcing the company's ethics policy.  William G. Cornely, a former partner with PricewaterhouseCoopers who helped Dominion become a public company in 1994, will supervise the Dublin homebuilder's financial reporting, accounting and related tasks, Dominion said today.

 

Dominion's former chief financial officer, Terrence R. Thomas, resigned last week amid an investigation of its mortgage practices by the Ohio attorney general and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.  Douglas G. Borror, Dominion's chairman and chief executive, said part of Cornely's job will be to initiate ethics practices.

 

MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=160500

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From the 1/22/06 Marion Star:

 

 

PHOTO: Kate Richter, 21, left, and Stephanie Coy, 21, take a smoke break from classes at the Marion campus of The Ohio State University. Both women think a comprehensive smoking ban for employees at Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. in Marysville infringes on people's personal rights. The Marion Star/Bill Sinden

 

Marysville company forcing a healthy choice: If you're a smoker, you can't work here

Longtime employee says ban shows Scotts cares

By JOHN JARVIS

The Marion Star

 

A comprehensive smoking ban at a Marysville company didn't appear out of thin air.

 

"We've known probably for a year," said Lynne Ledley, a customer master at Scotts Miracle-Gro Co., which is located about 25 miles southwest of Marion. "They kind of phased it in gradually."

 

It is a new policy that gives employees of the marketer of consumer lawn and garden products until October to quit smoking or face losing their jobs. The company is providing free counseling, nicotine patches and cessation classes as part of a wider program to improve employee health and control health care costs at Scotts.

 

Read More...

 

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I say just raise the smocker's premiums, that seems most fair. By not giving that option, it makes me think the company actually does care about their employees.

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.... By not giving that option, it makes me think the company actually does care about their employees.

 

That is a very scary "big brother knows what's best for you" kind of statement.  There's no denying smoking's dangers, but to say that a corporation should be allowed to dictate what we do in our private lives scares the hell out of me.  Next you'll see undercover health enforcers from Scotts scoping out all the fast-food joints in Marysville because the Fatty McAsses working there are running up the health care costs as well.

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Safe Auto plans move to Easton

Insurer says it’ll keep its Whitehall building; 200 jobs may be added at new headquarters

Friday, January 27, 2006

Mike Pramik

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Safe Auto Insurance Co. plans to leave its Whitehall location and build a $20 million headquarters at Easton.  The homegrown vehicle insurer, known for its "minimumcoverage" pitch, will move to a four-story, 150,000-square-foot office building at Easton Oval in 2007.  Most of the company’s 500 area employees will move to the new offices, and 200 jobs could be created, Chief Executive Ari Deshe said.  Safe Auto will keep its current location at 3883 E. Broad St., but plans are incomplete for the building’s use.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/01/27/20060127-B1-01.html

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Cardinal will add 300 jobs

Dublin to benefit from consolidation effort

Thursday, January 26, 2006

Barnet Wolf

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Cardinal Health Inc. will add more than 300 jobs in Dublin, as the company consolidates its financial shared-services operations into two sites from locations across the country.  Cardinal is leasing MetroCenter III, an office building at 475 Metro Place S., for one of the centers.  The other will be located in an existing company plant in Albuquerque, N.M.  The Dublin center will handle the accounts-receivable portion of the business, including credit underwriting, collections and processing cash.  The New Mexico center will oversee payments from Cardinal to vendors and others, such as utilities.

 

Read more at http://www.dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/01/26/20060126-B3-01.html

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Why has Columbus become the insurance capitol of the world?  It used to be Hartford but with Progressive, Nationwide and Safe Auto, I think Columbus may be. 

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That's correct, Progressive's main offices are located in the Cleveland area.

 

However, in addition to Nationwide and SafeAuto, Columbus also has:

 

Motorists Insurance:

Skyline20.jpg

 

Grange Insurance (which recently announced they'll be constructing a new 200,000 sq. ft. building next to their current HQ's in the Brewery District).

Brewery24.jpg

(Their building is the brick on in the background on the right)

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Design for Resilience:

Complexity and Urban Systems

 

Guest Speaker: Dr. Braden R. Allenby

Lincoln Professor of Engineering and Ethics

Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, and Law

Arizona State University

 

Several U.S. cities have recently been subject to unusual weather events

and deliberate attacks in ways that increase our concern about urban

vulnerability. The resulting demands for greater resilience have in many

cases failed to draw from the historical record and systems analysis, and

have therefore tended to seriously underestimate the difficulty of

enhancing the resilience of complex, adaptive systems such as cities.

Nonetheless, it is possible to begin sketching key policy principles that

can provide enhanced resilience. It is particularly important to develop

and implement such policies now, since current trends suggest that

future urban systems will be far more complex than those in which many

Americans now live. We must design for resilience!

 

Brad Allenby is an international thought leader in the field of sustainability. Prior to joining

Arizona State University he was Environment, Health and Safety Vice President for AT&T.

Also, he served as Director for Energy and Environmental Systems at Lawrence Livermore

National Laboratory, and was a Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering. He holds a

BA from Yale, a J. D. from University of Virginia Law School, a Masters in Economics from

University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences from Rutgers. He is current

President of the International Society for Industrial Ecology; Chair of the AAAS Committee

on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, and serves on numerous editorial and advisory

boards. He has authored many articles and book chapters, and his most recent book is

Reconstructing Earth, published by Island Press in 2005.

 

Distinguished Guest Lecture

Sponsored by Battelle Memorial Institute

Friday, March 3, 2006 Knowlton School of

12:30 to 1:30 PM Architecture, Room 250

Free admission Visitors: www.osu.edu/map/

Open to the public

 

Closest parking in Tuttle or 12th Ave. Garages

www.resilience.osu.edu

at the Ohio State University

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Too bad for Whitehall... :( ....Damn Death Star....

 

 

Safe Auto to leave city; loss deemed 'significant'

By SCOTT TAKAC and MARK CARLSON

 

Safe Auto Insurance Company will build a 150,000-square-foot national headquarters at Easton, company officials announced last Thursday -- leaving Whitehall with an empty building and dwindling income-tax revenues.  The four-story building will be built on eight acres at Easton Oval, adjacent to Interstate 270.  Construction is expected to begin this summer and wrap up sometime next year.  The company's headquarters are on East Broad Street in Whitehall, and there is a separate location of similar size on Fifth Avenue in Columbus, said company spokesman Bob Tenenbaum.

 

Read more at http://www.snponline.com/NEWS2-1/2-1_whsafeauto.htm

 

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PLUGGED IN

Suburbs using Internet as new development tool

Tuesday, February 07, 2006

By Jim Woods, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

High-speed computer lines are becoming as essential as water and sewer pipes when communities try to recruit businesses.  Dublin leads the way in central Ohio.  The city created DubLink in the late 1990s, an underground network of conduits for fiber-optic cable.  This spring, Dublin will take the next step, introducing a wireless Internet service — commonly known as Wi-Fi — that eventually will allow all the city’s residents to tap in.

 

The central Ohio area has a good reputation in the telecommunications field, said Gregory Dunn, a lawyer who specializes in the field.  Last year, Popular Science magazine rated central Ohio seventh-best in the nation for high-speed lines and wireless access.  Central Ohio is crisscrossed by more than 1,000 miles of fiber-optic cable, most of it owned by Ameritech.

 

But the Columbus area could be doing even more to promote high-speed connectivity, Dunn said.  Columbus city government’s technology experts are studying how they can improve connections between public groups and private businesses with fiber-optic, broadband and wireless resources.

 

More:

http://www.dispatch.com/business-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/02/07/20060207-C1-03.html

 

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Dominion offer doesn’t thrill

Tuesday, February 14, 2006

Jill Riepenhoff

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH 

 

Dominion Homes is offering several dozen southern Delaware County homeowners $2,500 apiece as compensation for failing to tell them about changes to their mortgages.

 

The Dublin-based builder didn’t tell 41 customers at the Village at Polaris Park that the company secretly converted their government-backed mortgages into loans given to borrowers with poor credit.

 

Residents have until March 13 to decide. If they sign, they also agree not to sue Dominion.

 

MORE: http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/02/14/20060214-B1-04.html

 

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