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Cincinnati: I-71 Interchange at MLK / Uptown Access Project

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I can't see the Calhoun and McMillan area ever going to 2 way streets. There is so much congestion there already, and all of the U Square garages require left turns. That would create total gridlock, I think.

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I could see Calhoun/McMillan switching from one-way to two-way at Vine Street. Calhoun and McMillan aren't too difficult to cross between Vine and Clifton. People aren't flying down those stretches as much as they are going to/from the highway.

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The motorcycle thing happens downtown too. A few times a week they are driving down Race St revving their engines to impress each other and no one else. It's getting really old, especially when it wakes up my infant son after we just put him down to sleep.

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​It will soon be easier for this Cincinnati neighborhood to get to Interstate 71

 

Residents in Uptown who live east of Interstate 71 soon will have an easier time getting to the highway.

 

As a part of the I-71/Martin Luther King Jr. interchange project, the city will convert McMillan Street to a two-way street between May Street and the I-71 on-ramp, allowing people traveling westbound from and through Walnut Hills to access the northbound I-71 on-ramp.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/news/2017/09/20/it-will-soon-be-easier-for-this-cincinnati.html

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Does anyone know when they'll finish the paving between MLK and the tunnel? They still need replace the old pavement on the Reading and Gilbert exits. I believe the construction north of Ridge, including re-doing the Ridge exit starts this spring.

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Last week I noticed that Google Maps was still not displaying McMillan was two-way up to the I-71 North ramp. So it was not routing any traffic west on McMillan to the new ramp. I submitted a correction and yesterday got an email saying that they had made the change.

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After years of construction, Martin Luther King Jr. Drive complete

 

The $6 million overhaul of the Clifton-to-I-75 stretch began in March. It widened and shifted the street to the north, improved the intersection at Dixmyth and Clifton avenues, put in a new storm water line and added a shared-use path for pedestrians and bicyclists from Central Parkway to Clifton Avenue. But that new bike facility remains unconnected to the Central Parkway protected bicycle lane.

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How would bikes get down to Central, anyway? Would they have to go off the path and into traffic to turn left onto the jughandle? Would you just illegally ride your bike on those narrow sidewalks? Ideally I think a bike-ped bridge that swings off of MLK from the north and slopes to Clifton would be ideal to connect to Central, but heaven knows this administration would never consider it.

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Demolishing housing units close to the urban core so that roads can be widened to make life easier for people who choose to live further away from the urban core.

after.thumb.jpg.be9ce84d19025e456d3b7e19e50d5782.jpg

before.thumb.jpg.fed6dddedd038412f9e10171ba8b787d.jpg

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^And every 1960s-era 4-8 family building that is demolished will be replaced by a new building that is much larger an inevitably more expensive.  All of those humble small multifamlies contribute to Cincinnati having relatively low rents. 

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I had a doctor's appointment at UC on Thursday.  I thought I was going to get out of there by 4pm but I ended up hitting the road at 4:45, so I was right at the cusp of the rush hour rush out of the area.  The sheer volume of cars that were moving and not gridlocking as they made their way to the new interchange was a sight to behold.  Then everything merged smoothly onto I-71N.  But I'm sure by 5:15 the place was a mess. 

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Although I guess it's not yet a "fair" comparison since MLK west is still being widened and there's a lot of construction over there, did it seem like the I-71 interchange has helped traffic out more or less than the Hopple interchange? I still haven't gotten on/off at it yet, other than the now-ridiculously-long offramp to Taft.

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Although I guess it's not yet a "fair" comparison since MLK west is still being widened and there's a lot of construction over there, did it seem like the I-71 interchange has helped traffic out more or less than the Hopple interchange? I still haven't gotten on/off at it yet, other than the now-ridiculously-long offramp to Taft.

 

Yeah I don't get the sense that the Hopple interchange was really a profound game changer, even though it removed one of Cincinnati's craziest road quirks.  It made a bigger difference for northbound traffic than it did southbound.  It got rid of the weird Bates to I-74 ramp, where people couldn't resist the temptation to cross two lanes of traffic and get on 75 north.  Plus, the weird ramps right by Cincinnati state were always kind of fun. 

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, GCrites80s said:

That's the most SNES Sim City-looking plan I've ever seen.

 

Plus, more of the same coming for the opposite side of I-71. 

 

 

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The designers of Sim City- 

Quote

 

Geoff Manaugh: While you were making those measurements of different real-world cities, did you discover any surprising patterns or spatial relationships?

 

Librande: Yes, definitely. I think the biggest one was the parking lots. When I started measuring out our local grocery store, which I don't think of as being that big, I was blown away by how much more space was parking lot rather than actual store. That was kind of a problem, because we were originally just going to model real cities, but we quickly realized there were way too many parking lots in the real world and that our game was going to be really boring if it was proportional in terms of parking lots.

 

Manaugh: You would be making SimParkingLot, rather than SimCity.

 

Librande: [laughs] Exactly.

 

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/05/the-philosophy-of-simcity-an-interview-with-the-games-lead-designer/275724/

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