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Please attend if you can.

 

 

The Niehoff Urban studio is pleased to present a public presentation

 

Date: Tuesday, February 15, 2005

 

Location: 110 East Central Parkway (corner of Walnut and Central Parkway)

The Emery Center - The UC Niehoff Urban Studio and UC Community Design Center5:00 pm

> Open House Exhibit and public meeting for the unveiling of the NEW CENTRAL

> PARKWAY LANDSCAPE IMPROVEMENT PLAN by the Cincinnati Park Board and the

> Ohio Department of Transportation

>

>6:00 pm

>Urbanists sponsored presentation

>"WHAT IS HAPPENING WITH THE OVER-THE-RHINE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN" by

>Liz Blume, former City Planning Department Director

>Des Bracey, 3CDC OTR Coordinator

>Open and free to the public. Refreshments available at the Coffee Emporium

> until 6pm

>

>PUBLIC MEETING FOR CENTRAL PARKWAY LANDSCAPE IMPROVEMENT PLAN

>The public is invited to attend a meeting to view a plan for the

> enhancement of the medians along the section of Central Parkway between 12th Street and Sycamore.

The project is funded by the City of Cincinnati and the Ohio Department of

> Transportation.

>Where: 110 East Central Parkway

>When: February 15, 2005 at 5:00 PM

>Purpose: To share a concept plan and obtain public comment.

>The improvements are intended to make the parkway's landscape

> more sustainable and easier to maintain, and to make the parkway medians

> more attractive.

> For further information call the Cincinnati Park Board at 475-9600.

>

>ATTENTION URBANISTS:

>

> Have you wondered whatever happened to the comprehensive plan for

> Over-The-Rhine? If so, you are not alone....

>

> NEXT WEEK THE URBANISTS WILL AGAIN TURN THEIR FOCUS TO OVER-THE-RHINE AND

> THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN.

>

> On Tuesday, February 15, 2005, beginning at 5:00 p.m., the Niehoff Studio

> will be hosting the Urbanists. THE CINCINNATI PARK BOARD will be unveiling

> the newest Central Parkway Median Design. Come and see what happens when

> creative minds put their energy toward a project of this magnitude.

>

> Following the unveiling, Liz Blume will discuss the Over-The-Rhine

> Comprehensive Plan and its progress to date.

>

> Then, Des Bracey of 3CDC, will be on hand to answer questions about its

> role in Over-The-Rhine and the comprehensive plan.

>

> This event will be beginning a bit earlier to coincide with the unveiling.

> Doors open at 5:00 p.m. with the presentation getting underway around 5:30

> p.m. Liz and Des will begin speaking around 6:00 p.m. This is a great

> chance to learn more about the exciting things happening in

> Over-The-Rhine.

>

 

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Unfortunately I've scheduled myself for another obligation that night and can't make it. I wonder what's planned for the median? I don't think it looks bad.  Just give the trees a few more years to fill in.

 

If anyone makes it to the presentation, please post information afterward. Thanks.

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Putting more park into the parkway

Trees, public art, walkway in plans

By Gregory Korte| Enquirer staff writer

 

The Cincinnati Park Board will hold a public meeting to seek comments on its plan to improve the Central Parkway median at 5 p.m. Tuesday at the University of Cincinnati Community Design Center, 110 East Central Parkway. The Cincinnati Park Board will unveil plans Tuesday to give the Central Parkway median an $800,000 sprucing up.

 

But city officials don't want the plan to be just another road project. They're trying to create a long urban park with walkways and public art that recognizes the parkway's history - first as a canal that gave Over-the-Rhine its name, then as a two-mile subway project that went bankrupt in 1925, and finally as a major east-west traffic corridor.

 

The first phase will renovate the islands between Sycamore and Plum streets, then north to 12th Street. A future phase will extend the project to Liberty Street. The finished project will include new shade trees, with flowering trees and planters at each intersection; a new irrigation system (necessary because the subway underneath gives landscapers only two feet of topsoil); and decorative concrete walkways to make for easier crossings between downtown and Over-the-Rhine.

 

Full Story: http://vh10018.v1.moc.gbahn.net/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=AB&Date=20050214&Category=NEWS01&ArtNo=502140350&Ref=H3&Profile=1056&MaxW=600&title=1

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The concept looks nice. I'm no horticulturist, but it would seem difficult to get trees as large as those pictured with only two feet of soil to work with.

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I'm a little underwhelmed considering many of the renderings I've seen at the Niehoff studio. I had see one possibility that used futuristic arches (think Air Force Academy chapel) and integrated them with the subway to create some kind of community space, an art gallery perhaps.

 

Also, don't big trees have big roots? Are we going to allow them to invade the subway?

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Typically, there are procedures in which large trees would do well on Central Parkway (which is wide).  Though it isn't recommended, it is certainly plausable and has been done before.  All that matters is material (re: #57 gravel underneath a roadway with a 20' diameter growth-space).


"You don't just walk into a bar and mix it up by calling a girl fat" - buildingcincinnati speaking about new forumers

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Interstate 71 in Mason area under review

Ramps could get revamped

BY STEVE KEMME | SKEMME@ENQUIRER.COM

 

MORE INFO: http://www.co.warren.oh.us/engineer/war/BOUmeeting_061807.pdf

 

IMAGE: http://cmsimg.enquirer.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Dato=20070716&Kategori=NEWS01&Lopenr=707160385&Ref=AR&Q=80&MaxW=450&MaxH=475&Site=AB&Q=80&Border=0&Title=0

 

Jonett Friend learned a long time ago to avoid the Ohio 741 exit in the afternoon rush hour when driving home from work on northbound Interstate 71.

 

"Coming off that exit is horrendous," said Friend, of Maineville. "You might sit on the exit ramp for 10 minutes."

 

She usually takes the Western Row Road exit, just south of the Ohio 741 interchange, and drives on side roads to get home.

 

The lack of a Western Row Road exit for southbound I-71 traffic forces John Lawhead to exit at Ohio 741, Kings Mill Road, and take a longer route to his Maineville home...

 

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070716/NEWS01/707160385/1056/COL02

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Traffic flow problems caused by increasingly heavy volumes of traffic using these two interchanges have triggered proposals to improve them that could cost $30 million to $68 million.

 

I believe we had a light rail option on the ballot a view years ago that would have helped serve this area, as well as many other areas.  But it was shot down primarily because of the high cost.  Well I would like to compare apples to apples.  Highway projects are piecemeal, and costs are therefore not examined as a whole.  But look at the costs for I-75 (thru the valley, Brent Spence, etc), I-275 and I-71.  All of these projects put together have an astronomically high price tag!

 

We'll take the middle ground and say that this will cost $50 million or so...that's a ton of money for just two interchanges, and it's more than likely just a band-aid fix that will need more money pumped into it in the not so distant future.

 

That is disgusting to me.

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^ "That is disgusting to me."

 

I agree, and you make an excellent point about road construction projects being presented to the public in a piece-meal process to disguise the total picture.

 

Do you think this has anything to do with the existing, entrenched, construction companies that rely on government road work for a large piece of their budgets? 

 

If a rail system was built, would these same companies be utilized?  Would outside companies with rail expertise be utilized?

 

Road construction projects remind me of the old AT&T system before the breakup (circa 1983).  At that time, the Bell companies had to put out general RFQ for each switch and switching stations.  But I remember a Bell exec telling me (actuall, the group I was with) that in reality, the Bell companies would call up ATT's construction company (Western Electric), ask what was needed for a particular type switching station, and write the RFQ along those guidelines.  The Bell company then knew that ATT would come in the least expensive and best fit.

 

Essentually, the local Bell planners were taking the easy way.  Ask the entrenched manufacturer what should be supplied, and write the RFQ to match it.    Government transportation infrastructure planners remind me of that.

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"It all depends on when funding is available," said Kurt Weber, Warren County chief deputy engineer.

 

 

A copy of a post/reply I made on the Cincinnati Metro thread several days ago from a Warren County official, right back at you A$$hole!: 

 

The trustees approved the subsidy, as did the county — Mason is one city yet to address the contract renewal — but Warren County Commissioner Michael Kilburn also opposed the agreement, saying riders should pay their own way.

"Warren County government should cease funding the project immediately and let it be totally market-driven," he said. "If they need it, they can get in their jeans and pay for it."

 

This idiot better watch what he says.  Next time they ask for any subsidies for roads or highway improvements, I would say "let the Warren County residents pay for it".  Pretty short sighted if you ask me.

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This is nothing.  Talk about road building subsidies -

 

Check out OKI's Southwest Warren County Transportation Study http://www.oki.org/transportation/southwestwarren.html

 

Its jampacked with $300 million in highway spending including a new six-lane bridge over the Little Miami River and a study of the Fields Ertel Interchange - Yes, actually fixing this clusterf*** is not included in the $300 million price tag.  Fear not there is $2.9 million for bikeway projects and $1.25 for a "low priority" bus circulator.

 

Check the project list and maps out at http://www.oki.org/pdf/swwcch7.pdf

 

 

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Does anyone know where copies of the original concept pictures can be found?  I see all the construction and want to see what the final product will be.  I saw them once at Enquirer.com, but I could find them in a search now.

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This may seem like a strange quesion.... but.....

 

Why in Cincinnati are trucks not permitted to drive on the Parkways? (i.e. Central Parkway, Victory Parkway, Columbia Parkway... etc)

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There's a major road, highway, if you can call it that called the Natchez Trace that runs a pretty good distance that even prohibits vehicles with commercial signage ... and if you're caught on it, forget about it ... there's no sympathy.

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Why in Cincinnati are trucks not permitted to drive on the Parkways? (i.e. Central Parkway, Victory Parkway, Columbia Parkway... etc)

 

Not just Cincy: the idea originated when driving was a recreation.  The idea of a parkway was to get away from commerical traffic and buildings, and have an enjoyable driving experience.

 

I had friends in college whose parents belonged to the Atlanta Driving Club.  The club house was adjacent to Piedmont Park and was very upscale.

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I'm giving my car a carport. I refuse to give my car the same living standards as myself ;)

 

You live in a house with concrete floors, little insulation and an overall unfinished look?

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No but it's almost that bad LOL! Still, why would my car deserve those amenities? My mom's cars have convenient access to the beer fridge. That's just asinine.

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    The parkway concept goes back to the beginning of the automobile era. The 1907 Kessler Plan proposed the construction of Central Parkway, Victory Parkway, and Columbia Parkway, as well as some others that didn't get built. The idea was to separate traffic, and keep all commercial traffic and streetcars off of the parkways. In the case of Central Parkway, the concept extended to Western Hills Viaduct, where the commercial traffic and streetcars used the lower level, and the top level connected to Central Parkway. The concept somehow carries on today, with signs saying "No trucks allowed; local shipments must enter at nearest side street" or something like that.

 

    For Columbia Parkway especially, the grades and curves are probably not very good for trucks.

 

   

 

   

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Study of views could guide development

Group hopes to preserve scenic drive

By Steve Kemme, Cincinnati Enquirer, October 26, 2008

 

For thousands of motorists, Columbia Parkway is the main route to and from work.

 

But it has another facet many believe is just as important.

 

Often referred to as Cincinnati's premier terrace, Columbia Parkway offers breathtaking views of the Ohio River, Mount Adams and the Kentucky hills.

 

"I would say it's one of the top 10 scenic urban drives in America," said Eric Russo, executive director of the Hillside Trust, a nonprofit organization that works to protect hillsides in the region.

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Changes to Columbia Parkway at the Taft & Torrence Intersection

http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov/city/downloads/ColumbiaParkwayTaftTorrenceChanges.pdf

 

The City of Cincinnati is changing the lane turning assignments and adjusting the traffic signal timing at the intersection of Columbia Parkway, Taft Road and Torrence Parkway. These changes will better serve traffic to and from the O’bryonville Neighborhood Business District as well as other nearby Communities in the City.

 

Specifically, beginning on Saturday, October 18, 2008, the following changes will be in effect:

 

  • Traffic traveling southbound on Torrence Parkway will now be allowed to turn left onto eastbound Columbia Parkway from the left most approach lane. This left turn was previously restricted.
  • Traffic traveling eastbound on Columbia Parkway will now be allowed to turn left onto Taft Road or Torrence Parkway. The left turn to Taft was previously restricted.
  • Traffic traveling westbound on Columbia Parkway destined for Taft Road will now be required to make their turn from the second lane from the right. Prior to this change, traffic was turning onto Taft from the curb lane, sharing it with traffic turning right onto Torrence Parkway.
  • Traffic traveling westbound on Columbia Parkway destined to Torrence Parkway will continue to make their right turn from the curb lane as before.

 

Appropriate signing at and in advance of the intersection will be present informing motorists of the proper travel lane, depending on their destination. Motorists should proceed with caution as all drivers adjust to these changes.

 

For more information about our department, please visit www.cincinnati-oh.gov/dote

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Off the top of my head the Natchez Trace Parkway is about 400 miles long.  I drove it from Nashville to Jackson, Miss in 2000 on my way to New Orleans.  The section closest to Nashville is the best part, although it's total pork.  It has almost no traffic whatsoever in Tennessee and is used for training purposes by professional bikers.  In Mississippi it turns into a local road in several places. 

 

 

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Off the top of my head the Natchez Trace Parkway is about 400 miles long.  I drove it from Nashville to Jackson, Miss in 2000 on my way to New Orleans.  The section closest to Nashville is the best part, although it's total pork.  It has almost no traffic whatsoever in Tennessee and is used for training purposes by professional bikers.  In Mississippi it turns into a local road in several places. 

 

 

I had no idea it was so long.  I only knew of the section on the west side of Nashville, beginning at Centennial Park.

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Not sure if this has been mentioned anywhere else...

 

I noticed that US-50/Columbia Parkway has been modified between Newtown Road and Old Milford.  It was changed from 2 lanes in each direction to 1 lane each way plus a shared center turn lane.  I'm curious if anybody has information about why this change was made.  The turn lane seems like a waste as there are few driveways through much of this area.

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http://www.dot.state.oh.us/districts/D08/Pages/PublicInvolvementMeetingSchedule.aspx

See "Hamilton County -US 50 -Terrace Park/NewTown Rd." at bottom of page

 

Thanks.  Here is an excerpt for anyone else curious:

 

Throughout this section of US50, the existing four lane configuration will be converted to three lanes, consisting of one thru lane in each direction and a two-way left turn lane in the middle. The work conducted for this project will occur within existing right-of-way limits.  Currently, the lane widths are 10’ and catch basins are within the traveled lane.  The project will provide for three standard 12’ wide lanes (center lane will be a left turn lane) and move the catch basins outside the traveled lane.  See attached drawing for more detail on the proposed striping change.

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I drive over, and canoe under this bridge frequently. It seems pretty sound to an untrained eye.  Surely, there has got to be more pressing needs than this structure.  Brent Spence anyone?

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What a waste.  I have a hard time believing that this thing can't be strengthened to prevent anything like what happened in Minneapolis for a lot less money than replacing it. 

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    Comparing the Jeremiah Morrow bridge to the Minneanapolis bridge is a bit of a stretch. They are both deck trusses, which means that the roadway deck is above the structural steel. The comparison ends there.

 

    The Minneanapolis bridge failed due to a design error. The surprising thing is that the defect was not noticed, or at least not acted upon. You can bet that every state DOT in the country is paying more attention to the gussett plates since the Minneanapolis incident.

 

    The Jeremiah Morrow bridge is narrow, which is the same problem that the Brent Spence bridge has.

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Take for instance the Clays Ferry Bridge, that carries Interstate 75 and more traffic than ODOT's Interstate 71 crossing --

http://bridgestunnels.com/index.php?catid=57

 

"In August 1946, as part of ongoing improvements to modernize U.S. Route 25, the Kentucky State Highway Department completed a new two-lane, three-span, continuous Warren-truss bridge. At the time of its completion, it was the seventh highest crossing in the United States. In 1963, a twin span was constructed when Interstate 75 was constructed through central Kentucky. Both bridges were widened and joined in 1998, to form a single six-lane freeway as part of an on-going highway widening project."

 

1946:

full_2_764.jpg

 

2008:

full_2_355.jpg

 

You don't need a brand new span. You just need to join them together, where there is room for a full left- and right-shoulder.

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What a waste. I have a hard time believing that this thing can't be strengthened to prevent anything like what happened in Minneapolis for a lot less money than replacing it.

 

I don't think it would be possible to patch up steel that's been overstressed for years.  I doubt the bridge was designed to carry anywhere near as many vehicles per day as it currently does.  Plus, it's only 2 lanes with tiny shoulders.  I've noticed that all along I-71 bridges and roadways are being widened in preparation for 3 lands of traffic throughout.  This bridge would be no different.  Anyways, I'll take the DOT's word for it if they say it needs replacement, and they have been saying that for years.  Our infrastructure is aging and sadly most of it was designed with a 40 year shelf life in mind.

 

That said, I don't think we'd be considering this projet at all if it weren't for the flawed stimulus bill.  I've seen all sorts of low-priority projects getting bumped up because the feds are printing and handing out money.  There's no way to really tell if this project is a priority or not.

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  A four-lane divided highway, two lanes in each direction, is the safest configuration for cruising. Widening existing interstates to three lanes in each direction is not the best move, in my humble opinion. Adding a whole new interstate from say, Cincinnati to Zanesville might be a better solution traffic-wise. Even better might be new passenger rail. The age of petroleum is halfway over anyway.

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^But automobiles will always be around, using some form of fuel, whether it is petroleum, hydrogen or other alternate sources. We have to design with what we have and what demand we have for it.

 

As far as lane configurations go, two-lane (in each direction) interstates are optimally safe since you only have one conflicting side to deal with. But when they reach a level-of-service (LOS) of C to D, especially during non-peak traffic periods in rural areas, then it is time to think of widening the existing facility to three-lanes. That said, the LOS for Interstate 71 as it crosses the bridge is C and the area has an above-average accident rate due to the LOS, and using the average-annual traffic counts alone, three-lanes is now justified.

 

^Ram23, the bridge is in sound condition and can be serviceable for at least another 30 to 40 years with no major maintenance. Cheaper, pre-stressed concrete spans are the bridges with typical 30- to 40-year life spans due to intrusions of salt and weathering effects, although many in Kentucky and Tennessee are much older than that and are structurally fine.

 

Even though it is two lanes with no shoulders, it can be widened to three-lanes with full left- and right-shoulders as the right-of-way currently exists to do that. With the Interstate 75 Clays Ferry Bridge in Kentucky, the bridge was originally two 12-foot lanes total, supplemented with an identical dual span some 20 years later. A bridge was constructed in between both, and there was enough room to give it six-lanes total with full shoulders. I don't see why it can't be done here, especially since these bridges are much newer.

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^ I thought the Clay's ferry spans were closer together that the I-71 spans when they were "stitched" together. The I-71 median is 84' wide, so widening 12' lanes and 10' shoulders to the inside will still leave a 40' wide median. That's too wide to have one combined pier for the median, so the option would have to be an adjacent new pier to support the widened deck- which I suspect would be too thin to be that tall (think stability issues). I am also aware that there are a couple of "suspended spans" there too, a 'bridge within a bridge'; those sections of bridge are suspended by hangers and supported from the adjacent spans

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