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Cleveland: University Circle (General): Development and News

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How large of a site are we discussing? The reason I ask - 500K sq. feet is roughly equivalent to the floorspace in One Cleveland Center. 2 million sq. feet - well, Key Tower has about 1.4 million sooo... this could be *huge* with a capital F!  :-o

 

*EDIT* Ok... on 14 acres... interesting indeed!

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Here is an editorial from Thursday.  It has some interesting tid bits, like the fact that two developers approached Case about the site.

 

Case for the future

Vision of a modern medical mecca on University Circle holds tremendous promise for all of Greater Cleveland

Thursday, February 24, 2005

 

The pioneering medical complex that Case Western Reserve University plans for University Circle represents the type of vision this region needs if it is to prosper in the 21st-century economy.

 

The West Quad proposal builds on the area's greatest economic strengths even as it focuses squarely on groundbreaking approaches to health care. It carries the possibility of thousands of new jobs, cutting-edge biotechnology companies and millions of new dollars in research grants.

 

Most important, it positions Cleveland to be a national leader in what Case medical school Dean Ralph Horwitz sees as a revolution in the way individual patients are treated and cured.

 

The proposal for a complex encompassing as many as 2 million square feet of laboratories, academic offices and commercial space clearly carries financial risk. But without risk-taking, this region will continue its economic slide. What's more, Case is approaching the project in a careful, thoughtful manner, committing resources of its own but also placing responsibility for its overall financial success with whichever developer wins the job.

 

The concept is attractive to developers. Case's leaders have already met with four firms - and two called the university first.

 

The proposal has not only a substantial commitment for space from Case, but the planned relocation of the Cleveland Health Department and the possibility of a satellite county health office. In addition, developers can count on the proximity and engagement of the region's two major health systems, University Hospitals and the Cleveland Clinic.

 

Five years ago, this community suffered a significant loss when Mt. Sinai Medical Center closed its doors. Today, Horwitz and Case President Edward Hundert have presented a compelling vision for the now-vacant site - one made possible only because organizations that once treated one another as rivals now recognize the benefits of collaboration.

 

This cooperative spirit, made possible largely because of Case's visionary leadership, holds the promise of significant economic growth for the region and progress in health care for the nation.

 

 

 

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I've been keeping up with this project through the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission's Weblog: http://planning.co.cuyahoga.oh.us/blog, which is a great resource for those of us who live out of town, but want to keep up with day-to-day news around the Cuyahoga Cty area.  CoolCleveland is also great...and there used to be a Cleveland Development Projects website, but I think the guy called it quits.

 

Anyways, great news.  It seems like all the needed players are on the same side and we could actually see this thing happen over the next 10+ years.  Add to that new housing construction all around the Circle and up the hill, a renovated Wade Oval and Lagoon, an expanded CMA, CIA CIM, and CWRU and continued investments by both hospitals...plus Euclid Corridor.

 

On the housing note, any progress on the renovation of the beautiful, historic Park Lane Villa?

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I saw a construction vehicle (a cherry picker type thing)  out front of it yesterday, but I didn't stop to see what it was up to. 

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Here is somewhat of an update on the Triangle and Beach projects (scroll down a bit).  Geez, I wish they would all get on the same page because it doesn't look like anything will happen soon with all these issues.

 

http://www.hotelbruce.com/01_02/bruceblog.php

 

University Circle deal spins round and round

 

With all the noise being made about infusing University Circle with a new street life, the stakes are getting higher and the allegiances shifting in the plot to figure out where to create the type of thriving commercial center that is a given at world-class universities.

 

Bruce blog has obtained information that explains the deafening silence of late surrounding the proposed $35 million retail-residential development at the corner of Ford and Euclid. For starters, Heritage Development Co., the developer, has not acquired the rezoning and variances from the city. The process has stalled in large part because the university is now insisting that the developer conduct a market analysis for the proposed supermarket tenant, a traffic analysis, and an analysis of residential rents.

 

After the university was pressured from the community to lower the height of the project (among other things), it insisted on reductions in the proposed size from 234 to 220 residential units and a reduction in underground parking spaces from 334 to 247. Meanwhile, Heritage’s refusal to take a public subsidy in order to maintain full control over the plan may be imperiling the financing of the project. Sources inform Bruce blog that the developer recently tried to negotiate a cash investment from Case and University Circle, Inc., which was met with a chilly reception.

 

Documents obtained by Bruce blog show university officials in December telling the developer that maybe ‘it would be wise to take a step back and take our time reviewing all aspects of this development.’ In a letter to Case and UCI, Heritage complains that ‘I distinctly feel that there is a change of attitude on each of your parts towards this development.’

 

Indeed, if Heritage is feeling the wind coming out of its sails, it might look across the street to see where it’s heading. The closer Case gets to finalizing its purchase (from UCI) of The Triangle apartments and commercial strip center on the northeast corner of Euclid and Mayfield , the more bargaining power it gains. Here it has a developable parcel with less issues: It’s not casting a shadow on Hessler Street where neighbors have complained (and threatened lawsuits) about the Heritage project, the university has a large surface parking lot practically attached, and it has existing structures from which to work (all of which drastically reduce development costs). Can Heritage hope to regain the leverage it once enjoyed? Stay tuned...

 

Speaking of The Triangle...

 

It seems as though UCI is the gatekeeper in seeing that Case commits to a plan to redevelop the Triangle as a commercial-use property. Whether the nonprofit has what it takes to stand up to the behemoth of Case is not clear, but, in documents obtained by Bruce blog, it looks as though Case is leading the negotiations on this one. One alteration that jumps out is the university adding ‘academic’ to the memorandum of understanding between it and UCI on the proposed uses of the Triangle. Sources familiar with the deal speculate that Case is leaving the option of relocating a future home of its Arts and Sciences college open. As it stands, UCI and other University Circle institutions will be informed of but not involved in making the plans.

 

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Does anyone know about the time of the future phases of new Case dorms?  I think that Case would do a lot better in attracting students if it had a better campus (dorms+college town). 

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wait, community wanted it shorter? never heard that....

 

future phases? not sure of a time line, but the north residential village will be completely rebuilt. I'd imagine they'd start on the old north dorms shortly after the new north village is complete (occupancy fall 2005)

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With the huge construction boom going on, is there an area of UC that can be developed as a Forest City type mega development?

 

Just wondering, with all the new people probably moving to Cleveland ( :clap: ) for the new Case/Clinic labs, it could be a good opportunity.

 

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there really isn't any huge tracts of land that aren't developed in some shape or form other than some scattered parking lots, not that i can think of off hand.....

 

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There's a pretty significant development/redevelopment project going on around East Boulevard called "Heritage Lane."

 

http://www.city.cleveland.oh.us/mayor/press/2004/200408/08_19_2004.html

 

Here are the key parts of it...

 

"The Heritage Lane Historic Homes and Heritage Lane Townhomes combined, are a $18 million development project being made possible through $2.5 million in Housing Trust Funds and $2 million in Empowerment Zone Funds from the City of Cleveland. Additional funding is being made possible through National City Bank, Huntington Bank, the Local Initiatives Support Corporation, and Village Capital Corporation.

...

Located on the east side of East 105th Street, between Superior and Wade Park, the Heritage Lane Historic Homes range in size from 3,500-5,000 square feet, and include magnificently restored exteriors, full front porches, hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, gourmet kitchens, 5-7 bedrooms, bedroom level laundry facilities, 2-3 bathrooms, all customized to buyer’s tastes. The starting price is $274,000.

 

Located on the west side of East 105th Street, right across the street, the Heritage Lane Townhomes floor plans will range from 1,600 to 2,100 square feet and feature 1.5-2.5 baths, 2-3 bedrooms, live-work bonus room, second story deck, bay window, basement, private drive, and two-car garage. The starting price is $174,900.

 

Both housing developments will feature below market financing. The Heritage Lane Historic Homes will also include 10-year tax abatement, while the Heritage Lane Townhomes will include 15-year tax abatement."

 

and a site plan from Progressive Urban Real Estate:

 

 

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Some photos of the lots on Euclid/Ford/Mayfield and how they relate to the new dorms...

 

Mi Pueblo & the Euclid Tavern [sniff, sniff], looking northeast from E. 117th & Euclid:

IMG_2648.jpg

Looking back towards the new Case North Residential Village construction:

IMG_2649.jpg

Corner of E. 115th & Euclid, looking west towards Ford/Mayfield:

IMG_2647.jpg

Another, including the newly acquired Triangle property on the left:

IMG_2652.jpg

 

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I miss the Euclid Tavern too.  With so many people interested, you'd think someone would hop on the idea of resurrecting it.  But, maybe things have moved on- new Grog Shop, Beachland Ballroom, HOB, etc.  Whoever did it would have to try to find some special niche.

 

Those Case dorms are starting to look impressive.  They seem to match well with the older brownstone apartments around that area.

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yeah, well, considering the amount of investment that CWRU is putting into on-campus housing alone, the Euc' is going to be right on the edge of campus with a whole new population of students just two blocks away.  Add to that the potential redevelopment of several sites nearby and the existing housing that's already there...there's got to at least be a market for a bar/pub/tavern, right?  The other thing about the Euc' is that it wasn't exactly the ideal spot to see or hear music, but it's a great place to have a beer and hang out.  The market will bring it back...believe!

 

and yes, walking around the CWRU/Wade Oval area reinvigorated my belief that it is one of the most beautiful places in the city...just give people a place to LIVE down there and it'll get even hotter!!!

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Once they finish the North Residential Village this summer, they are supposed to start knocking down the old dorms in groups of three and replacing them.  I don't know the timeline, but I got the impression that it will be a continual process.  This should really change things for the better.  Even before I knew what good architecture was, I hated thos old dorms across from Arabica. Very depressing and cold.

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really?  that's great, because the ones that I was standing next to when i took those pictures were terrible!  i mean, i had some of the worst while at UC, but come on, these things looked like temporary military housing on stilts!

 

So, i guess i assumed (bad move) that they were going to try to lure more students to either stay on campus longer or move to campus where they would otherwise commute.  i'm assuming they have an undergraduate residency requirement like most other schools, but if they wanted to provide an option for students to stay on campus longer and not move elsewhere, the new housing would suit that purpose.  either way (knocking down or leaving the old stuff) I think there are going to be many more rooms for students in the neighborhood and students like to hang out and drink beer (sometimes even legally!), so the effect on the stretch of Euclid closer to 120th Street could still be noticeable.

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yes, case is trying to expand. When they added about another 300 or so to the recent freshman classes, they realized there wasn't enough dorm space to accomodate the extra kids. So in the long run there will be an increase.

 

And yes case does have a housing requirement, 3-yrs or 21 yrs of age to live off-campus. But its extremely easy to lie your way out of it.

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The old dorms will be replaced with more of what you see going up already.  The difference is that they will be arranged around a traditional quad, not a ballfield like the current set.

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wow, that sounds great!  i mean, I've heard of professional development, but providing startup workspace and capital???  geez!  how attractive would that be as an incoming/prospective student???

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I agree. They probably spent way too much money on that video.  The music, the Elvis.  The dorms are pretty enough, you don't need a bad video to prove it to the students. 

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Am I the only one who didn't know that the CWRU village project was going to be LEED certified???  If they receive certification, this project will be among the first (and largest) in Ohio!  This is fantastic!  I hope Cleveland and Cuyahoga County are paying attention and will start to make certain LEED points mandatory in their new (public) projects.

 

Case's Village @ 115 to be among nation's leaders in energy efficiency, environmentally conscious design

First phase of $126 million North Residential Village to open this fall

May 9, 2005 | For more information: Kimyette Finley 216-368-0521

 

Case Western Reserve University’s new $126 million housing project —The Village at 115—is expected to be among the nation’s leaders in energy efficiency and environmentally conscious design.

 

In addition to pursuing points on the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building rating system for the seven residential houses in three buildings that will open this fall, Case also is establishing one of the most comprehensive systems for measuring energy consumption.

 

“We’ll be among the first LEED-certified buildings in Ohio and considered a national leader in energy measurement and verification. This will be on the cutting edge,” said Donald Kamalsky, assistant vice president for student affairs and director of housing at Case.

 

Informational kiosks in each residential house will provide the 740 students who occupy The Village at 115 with statistics on real-time steam, water and electricity. Monthly and annual energy use will be monitored and calculated per house and per student occupant.

 

In addition, energy operations for the Village at 115 will be compared to existing conventionally-designed buildings on campus.

 

Overall, the high performance buildings in The Village at 115 are expected to reduce annual energy consumption by 40 percent, and reduce peak heating and cooling demand by 30-40 percent over conventional buildings.

 

“We wanted to make the buildings a teaching instrument and help students to learn and live an environmentally appropriate lifestyle,” said Gene Matthews, director of facilities services at Case. “Once students understand how their lifestyles impact [the environment], they can begin to control how much energy the building consumes, and it gives them some control over their living space.

 

“Our goal is to produce a generation of students who are more environmentally aware and conscious not because they learned it out of a book, but because they learned to live that way here,” Matthews added.

 

The data on energy consumption also will be broadcast on the Internet, allowing researchers from almost anywhere to access the information.

 

Energy-efficient initiatives for The Village at 115 include a heating and cooling system design that allow for hot and chilled water to be generated at two central locations and then distributed to each house that is part of this phase of the project. The system is designed to reduce energy usage and loss, as well as maximize free cooling and heating during the “shoulder” seasons of fall and spring.

 

The Village at 115 also features a unique system for ground water recharge, the collection of surface storm water and most roof run-off water. The water will percolate into the ground gradually rather than into the sewer system with wastewater.

 

“Students said we should be a model for building energy-efficient buildings. Being responsive to environmental concerns was the responsible thing to do,” Kamalsky said.

 

In addition to the environmentally conscious features that will exist in the new buildings, Kamalsky said about 60 percent of the construction waste for this project has been recycled.

 

Other energy conservation measures and efforts to encourage recycling for The Village at 115 include:

 

-highly insulated, air tight buildings

-light shelves

-high-performance windows

-local materials such as brick, slate and poured in place concrete (cuts down on fuel and transportation costs)

-construction materials that were made from recycled materials

-motion detectors to monitor occupancy and reduce energy used for lighting

-recycling bins in each residential house

-electrical distribution that is designed to reduce power loss

-individual fan coil units in each suite to moderate temperature

-drip irrigation and low-flow plumbing fixtures for water conservation

 

Project organizers are compiling an inventory of all these environmental measures and will send the information to the U.S. Green Buildings Council, which will award LEED points for the project. LEED-certified professionals have been involved with various stages of The Village at 115.

 

 

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One of the buildings is going to be going for LEED Gold.  That's a level that only a handful of buildings nationally have attained.  And people panned these buildings for being too architecturally conservative!  Progressivety isn't just style.

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I was poking around Case's site and found a reference to the architects that are planning the new dorms.  Looks like they are in the final stages of planning out the rest of the new phases for the dorms.  Specifically, I have heard that a consolidation of Greek houses is part of the next step.  Here is some info from the architect's site:

 

ASG completed the 128-acre Case Western campus master plan in 2002. The University then requested a site plan and further study of the North Residential Village as the location of the Greek community, with prototype buildings for 18, 24, and 36 students in duplex and stand-alone facilities.

 

This strategy was one of several presented in the master plan to meet Case Western’s goal of creating the premier living/learning environment. After the initial Greek focus, the study expanded to include the phased addition of six residential colleges for freshmen and additional on-campus housing for sophomores, juniors, and seniors now on the south campus. That area would become the site for graduate housing.

 

Student life services also will expand and improve, including a new dining and recreation facility to replace the existing dining halls.

 

Study Completion: 2005

 

 

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As much as I'm excited about the new plans for UC, I think this article raises a couple of valid concerns: 1) the seeming disregard for preserving the area's historic architecture; and 2) the fact that the area is becoming a medical/academic "ghetto" of sorts. There should be more emphasis on residential development and preservation! Lots of people would love to live in UC -- if only there were better housing options. I know there are some plans for new housing in the area, but a lot of it is for students.

 

E. 115th St. demolitions upset neighbors

Tuesday, August 30, 2005

Barb Galbincea

Plain Dealer Reporter

 

Tim Damon shook his head as he surveyed the clawfoot tub, silver radiators and slate shingles heaped among a pile of rubble that until Monday was a house on East 115th Street.

 

The building, owned by University Circle Inc., has been uninhabited and decaying since he and other tenants were moved out in 1998, Damon said.

 

The more than 100-year-old structure and the house beside it, just north of Euclid Avenue, are giving way for the eventual construction of a retail-residential complex along Euclid, according to Debra Posner, a UCI spokeswoman. For the short term, she said, the cleared property will be open, green space.   Oh great! Just what the city needs -- more vacant lots.

 

 

more at:  http://www.cleveland.com

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as much as I feel that UC needs residential and retail growth and is one of the areas of this city that can support it, I am saddened as well that there aren't more efforts at present to reuse historic structures.  I'm not familiar with the ones mentioned above, but I believe that two large, historic Mt. Sinai buildings are slated to come down on the West Quad property, while at the same time, a nasty parking garage is being "preserved."

 

On the other hand, satisfying both the aims of historic preservation and new housing provision, the beautiful Park Lane Villa building, adjacent to Wade Park Manor, will be renovated and reopened in the near future...a definite win there!

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I agree that 'holding vacant land for future possibilities' angle is poison here in Cleveland -- you know our town, that land could be vacant-yet-waiting 30 years from now. 

 

And yes MGD, I agree w/ your sentiment.  UCI/U. Circle, have probably the worst track record in historic preservation in the entire region.  While I'm obviously happy to have our world-renowned research hospitals there, UCI's allowed them (esp hemmed-in U. Hosp) to run roughshod over its historic residential neighborhood, building garage after garage while tearing down some beautiful houses and old walk-ups.  Damn shame.

 

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clvndr,

 

The governing structure of UCI is set up so that it has to do what its largest members tell it to.  If Case says jump, then UCI has to jump.  A lot has been lost in the past decades due to poor ideas of how to grow the Circle.

 

 

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