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Columbus: Random Development and News

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http://www.dispatch.com/business/20180531/columbus-finalizes-plan-for-linking-affordable-housing-to-development-incentives

 

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/05/31/columbus-to-temper-incentives-in-fastest-growing.html

 

 

-- A two-year process of studying and revamping Columbus’ development incentives for a dozen key neighborhoods is nearing conclusion, with City Council expected to take up the final recommendations before their August recess.

 

-- Council plans to hold a public meeting — yet to be scheduled — before it votes on the measures, which are designed to encourage more affordable housing in these areas, while paring back sweeteners for now-upscale areas such as the Short North.

 

-- Franklinton and Linden were found to have the highest number of distress criteria, qualifying them as “Ready for Opportunity” neighborhoods.

 

-- The Hilltop, Livingston and James, Milo-Grogan, the Near East Side, North Central, South Side and Weinland Park all fell into the middle category, “Ready for Revitalization.”

 

-- The Short North, the former AC Humko site (Harrison West area, around Battelle) and Fifth by Northwest (the area just north of Grandview Heights and west of Rt. 315) ranked highest, as “Market Ready” areas.

 

-- In the most-distressed areas, developers can continue to receive the current 100 percent, 15-year property tax abatement for all projects without additional requirements.  Projects in areas defined as already up-and-coming will be be required to provide some housing units deemed affordable for median-income households, or work with a local nonprofit housing developer, which would have the same effect.

 

-- In the Short North and Fifth by Northwest areas, to be eligible for the property-tax abatement, developers will be required to set aside 20 percent of units for affordable housing, based on median household income in Columbus, or make a payment to an affordable-housing fund that will be used to aid other projects.

 

-- These changes in city policy will not affect Downtown, the Brewery District and a couple of other urban neighborhoods in which revitalization is already well underway because those improvement districts predate 1994, and to alter those rules would require a change in state law.

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Developer returns to Marble Cliff with downsized 5th Avenue project

 

A developer has reworked his plan to convert a historic 5th Avenue mansion into a new residential development.

 

A new plan for 2015 W. 5th Ave. proposes condos in front of the historic mansion, which would be preserved.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/07/17/developer-returns-to-marble-cliff-with-downsized.html

 

2018-0713-5th-ave-townhomes*1200xx5333-3000-839-0.jpg

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^This seems like a good compromise. Add some density and preserve the Packard-designed mansion.

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This does seem like a good compromise and this has actually been done several times in Marble Cliff. Not only with the Prescott Bush mansion, but two others as well.

 

The Warlick mansion at 1599 Roxbury was converted to four apartments and has apartments built around it hiding it from street view (Roxbury Arms) - http://www.ghmchs.org/tour-pages/rox-arms.html and http://www.thisweeknews.com/article/20150825/NEWS/308259596.

 

There is also another mansion on roxbury called the Casparis Castle that while the house wasn't broken up into sub units, the carriage house and land around it was built on (10 Arlington Place). It was built by marble cliff quarry owner, Sylvia Casparis, in 1908 and it's my understanding the reason for the five story carriage house was so he could keep an eye on his quarries by the river - http://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20170425/moment-in-time?start=2

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New Plan Calls for Preserving Marble Cliff Mansion

 

The developers behind a controversial proposal for a prominent site in Marble Cliff have changed course and now plan to preserve the historic mansion at the heart of the property.

 

F2 Companies and Elford Development presented the updated proposal to the Marble Cliff Village Council Monday night, and plan to return to the council on August 20 with a more detailed presentation. Village residents and other interested citizens will have a chance to weigh in on the new plan at that meeting.

 

“We believe that by incorporating the mansion in the development, we are creating a site that fits better within the Village, and better serves the wants and needs of the residents in the future,” said Ted Foster, of F2 Companies. “By retaining the historically significant mansion, we hope that we are preserving one of Frank Packard’s most well-known buildings.”

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/new-plan-calls-for-preserving-marble-cliff-mansion-bw1

 

Marble-Cliff-Fifth-Ave-620x382.png

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Update on this proposed land sale posted previously in this thread at https://www.urbanohio.com/forum/index.php/topic,419.msg908829.html#msg908829

 

41978362040_2a4c631cc3_o_d.png

 

43786759071_dfb93499a8_b_d.jpg

 

City intends to buy Ohio State University sheep farm, turn it into a park

 

The city wants to purchase a 58-acre sheep farm near Ohio State University's Don Scott Field in northwest Columbus and turn it into a park.  Ohio State has wanted to sell the land located at 2400 W. Case Road since 2016.

 

William Lane and Arla Lane donated the property to the university in 1954.  Ohio State uses the land for its sheep program and to produce forage for its beef cattle.  The sale would move farm animals off the property and the city would develop it into public park space

 

Community members in the area have been after the city for years to purchase the land.  "Myself and number of members in the community have been advocating the city buy the sheep farm and turn it into a community hub," said Roy Wentzel of the Columbus Northwest Blues, a neighborhood grassroots group in the area. "We’d like to see a library or rec center."

 

MORE: https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/07/25/city-intends-to-buy-ohio-state-university-sheep.html

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Little Turtle's $100M revival includes golf course upgrades, condos and apartments (slideshow)

By Tristan Navera  – Staff Reporter, Columbus Business First

Updated: August 7, 2018 - 12:10pm

 

The updates going in and around the Golf Club at Little Turtle has expanded to a $100 million transformation.  Hundreds of apartments and condos and new amenities and upgrades to the golf course itself are in the works or are underway.

 

Stonehenge Co. bought the private club in April 2015 and quickly committed to some upgrades of its clubhouse.  But the Columbus developer has been busy ever since at the golf course, which was built in 1969.  The developer is making significant upgrades on the course.  A driving range and tennis court have been removed and several of the holes have been completely rebuilt.  The club is planning a pool and workout facility with construction to start this fall.

 

Housing is a key component, too, and soon several holes will be lined with residences.  Plans in the 1970s called for 5,000 residences in the 225-acre Little Turtle area.  The development, however, remains about 400 units short of that goal.  Stonehenge plans to build 170 condos and 204 apartments along the golf course.  The first Highpointe Condos building already is underway and totally pre-sold.

 

MORE: https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/08/06/little-turtles-100m-revival-includes-golf-course.html

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Mount Carmel East is in the midst of a $310 million renovation project that started in 2015.  A remodeled lobby at the hospital opened May 4 and a 5-story tower with 128 rooms and a surgical suite with 13 operating rooms is scheduled to open in June.

 

The work on the facility at 6001 E. Broad Street is part of a $700 million project to expand and modernize three hospitals in the Mount Carmel Health System – Mount Carmel East, Mount Carmel Grove City and Mount Carmel West:

 

http://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20180503/mount-carmel-east-new-lobby-ready-tower-opens-in-june

 

In addition to all of above, a new trauma center opened at Mount Carmel East in early August:  https://www.nbc4i.com/news/local-news/with-new-trauma-center-mount-carmel-east-can-treat-patients-with-serious-condition-more-quickly/1354504629

 

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Another bit of Far East Side news:

 

Construction to begin on long-awaited fire station on Far East Side

 

The wait for a new fire station on the Far East Side is almost over, with the Columbus City Council recently approving construction after additional safety features were added to the building plans.  The decision to add those features, which are intended to limit firefighters’ exposure to chemicals that could cause cancer, came in early January and led to the delay of a project 10 years in the making.

 

Construction on the $10.5 million station at 711 N. Waggoner Road is set to begin in September and conclude in November 2019.  The station is expected to open in spring or early summer of 2020, according to council documents.  Plans for Fire Station No. 35 were first hatched a decade ago as calls to the Far East Side area increased.  But the Great Recession derailed the project.

 

MORE: http://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20180804/construction-to-begin-on-long-awaited-fire-station-on-far-east-side

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Follow-up from this March post - https://www.urbanohio.com/forum/index.php/topic,419.msg899656.html#msg899656 - about the new Franklin County Jail project.  The previous post has the renderings for this $175 million, 870-bed, 429,000 square-foot jail that will replace a downtown lockup facility next to the Franklin County Courthouse and a lockup at the County's Jackson Pike facility.  The County is also in design phase for an additional section to this new jail's footprint that would add about 1,300 beds and fully replace the Jackson Pike facility that opened in 1969.

 

Below is an update from the Dispatch on the project's construction and this intriguing construction photo showing the downtown skyline in the background:

 

http://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20180819/new-franklin-county-jail-designed-to-be-more-open-less-harsh

 

43545959604_70fe4b42c5_b_d.jpg

 

The new Franklin County Jail isn't really as close to downtown as it appears in that photo.  It's approximately three miles west of downtown at 2551 Fisher Road in what is turning into a "law enforcement district" within a light-industrial part of the city.  The Columbus Police Academy and Columbus Police training facility are located within a 1/3 mile of the new county jail site:

 

44214704332_9a4233ea5a_b_d.jpg

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^Also part of the "law enforcement district" is Twin Valley Behavioral Healthcare Hospital (hospital for the criminally insane) just south of I-70 from the new jail.

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Franklin County building $37M forensic sciences center

 

Franklin County is building a $37 million morgue and forensic science center on the South Side.

 

The county formally broke ground on the new 56,000-square-foot facility, which is being constructed at 2090 Frank Rd. The new facility will open in the first quarter of 2020 and replace the current morgue, which opened in 1975 near Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center.

 

The project is going up at the former Harmon Elementary School on a 15-acre site near the intersection of Frank Road and Harrisburg Pike.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/09/04/franklin-county-building-37m-forensic-sciences.html

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44490897571_c4551886f7_c_d.jpg

 

That's going to be a nice looking morgue - sorry, forensic science center.

 

Actually, the County really is doing some decent looking work for some typically unglamorous projects like this and the new county jail.

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Columbus Landmarks has picked their five finalists for its 29th annual James B. Recchie Design Award:

 

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/08/27/here-are-the-5-finalists-for-columbus-landmarks.html

 


Dorrian Green (built atop the COSI underground parking garage) - 50 S. Belle Street

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Columbus Metropolitan Library Northside Branch - 1423 N. High Street

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Lifeline of Ohio Donor Memorial & Plaza - 770 Kinnear Road

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The Julian - 272 S. Front Street (northeast corner of Front & Main)

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LeVeque Tower - 50 W. Broad Street (northeast corner of Front & Broad)

43880991954_38883ba750_c_d.jpg

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Columbus to Invest $400 Million in Neighborhood Programs

 

Some of the budgeted projects include:

 

$48 million for street resurfacing, lighting and sidewalks.

$20.6 million for the new interchange at North Broadway and SR-315.

$20 million for a new Linden Community Recreation Center.

$15.4 million for additional phases of streetscaping of High Street in the Short North.

$7.5 million for fire department upgrades.

$5 million for affordable housing development.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/columbus-to-invest-400-million-in-neighborhood-programs-we1

 

city-council-01-1150x550.jpg

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I'm not sure what thready this fits specifically but I stumbled across this earlier today...

 

https://www2.colliers.com/en/properties/134-east-goodale-street/USA-134-goodale-street-columbus-ohio-43215/USA1047583

 

Anyone know anything about this? I walk by this daily and haven't paid enough attention I guess because I had no clue this was happening. 

 

I moved this from the Italian Village thread into this Random Developments thread.  134 E. Goodale is located just south of the Italian Village boundaries and is technically within the Downtown District boundaries.  It sits in one of those "pockets" created by I-670 and the on and off-ramps associated with 670.  Here are two aerials of this area - one further out showing the surrounding neighborhoods and one closer view of the 134 E. Goodale building:

 

44938114751_912ff84166_b_d.jpg

 

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I haven't heard anything about this project, but would suspect that this Colliers listing is highly speculative (despite the nifty rendering).  As you can see from the close-in aerial, this pocket contains mostly uses like Capital City Awning and two light industrial type buildings across the street from 134 E. Goodale.  The one gem in this pocket is the magnificent Smith Bros building across N. 4th Street - which basically functions as a destination island of its own.  When Colliers calls this property "Centrally located and walking distance to the Short North and Italian Village" - they're not wrong - if you don't mind walking under freeway overpasses and dodging cars coming from all the on and off ramps!

 

Despite the encouraging rendering and features listed by Colliers, 134 E. Goodale Street is not an extension of Italian Village or the Short North where you would see this type of renovation happen.  It's in an isolated pocket of space that likely isn't ripe for this kind of development.  Unless the Cap City Awning building or that larger parcel south of Goodale is part of a redevelopment plan here, we likely won't see anything happening here.

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Epcon plans first housing project in Columbus in a decade

 

Epcon Communities is about to start on its first housing project in Columbus in a decade.

 

The Dublin-based developer has clearance to proceed on an 81-unit condominium community called The Courtyards at Riverside Drive. Epcon plans to build the condos on the eastern edge of Riverside Drive on the city’s border with Perry Township.

 

The property, which would include an open space, a retention pond and a clubhouse, would go up on a narrow, 20-acre strip of land at 5586 Riverside Dr., south of Cranston Drive. There are five houses on the property that would come down and some land would be annexed into Columbus.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/09/26/epcon-plans-first-housingproject-in-columbus-in-a.html

 

riverside-drive-prposal*750xx1216-684-135-0.png

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Mixed-use development proposed in Jefferson Township

 

screen-shot-2018-09-26-at-43344-pm*750xx1580-889-0-28.png

 

A mixed-use development is in the works in northeast Franklin County is hoped to "kick-start" a comprehensive plan recently passed in Jefferson Township.

 

Dublin-based Metro Development LLC has submitted plans to the county for a triangular 12-acre parcel of land at 712-726 Reynoldsburg-New Albany Road.

 

The plans for Kenmore Place call for 36,000 square feet for commercial use, 240 rental units, parking, a clubhouse, fitness center and pool.

 

“What we tried to do was submit a development request that fit to the letter their newly-adopted compressive plan, and I believe we did that,” said David Hodge, a real estate attorney with Underhill & Hodge and legal counsel for Metro Development.

 

More below:

https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/09/27/mixed-use-development-proposed-in-jefferson.html

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Despite the encouraging rendering and features listed by Colliers, 134 E. Goodale Street is not an extension of Italian Village or the Short North where you would see this type of renovation happen.  It's in an isolated pocket of space that likely isn't ripe for this kind of development.  Unless the Cap City Awning building or that larger parcel south of Goodale is part of a redevelopment plan here, we likely won't see anything happening here.

 

So after reading your post I kind of agreed because honestly yeah, it's a super tough spot however on my way in this morning it looks as if Colliers has removed the "Arena Storage" sign on the Goodale face of the building and now has put of a "Redevelopment Coming Soon" banner.  I think this may actually be happening despite even my greatest hesitation because this weekend there were numerous trucks hauling parked along Goodale that appears to be clearing out the structure. Ill snag a picture tomorrow morning for you all on my way in.... Crossing my fingers.

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Despite the encouraging rendering and features listed by Colliers, 134 E. Goodale Street is not an extension of Italian Village or the Short North where you would see this type of renovation happen.  It's in an isolated pocket of space that likely isn't ripe for this kind of development.  Unless the Cap City Awning building or that larger parcel south of Goodale is part of a redevelopment plan here, we likely won't see anything happening here.

 

So after reading your post I kind of agreed because honestly yeah, it's a super tough spot however on my way in this morning it looks as if Colliers has removed the "Arena Storage" sign on the Goodale face of the building and now has put of a "Redevelopment Coming Soon" banner.  I think this may actually be happening despite even my greatest hesitation because this weekend there were numerous trucks hauling parked along Goodale that appears to be clearing out the structure. Ill snag a picture tomorrow morning for you all on my way in.... Crossing my fingers.

 

134 E. Goodale is a nice enough building.  But it still seems like a difficult location for a Short North-type redevelopment.  But if they want to give it go, I'll be rooting for them!

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Update on this proposed land sale posted previously in this thread at https://www.urbanohio.com/forum/index.php/topic,419.msg908829.html#msg908829

 

41978362040_2a4c631cc3_o_d.png

 

43786759071_dfb93499a8_b_d.jpg

 

City intends to buy Ohio State University sheep farm, turn it into a park

 

The city wants to purchase a 58-acre sheep farm near Ohio State University's Don Scott Field in northwest Columbus and turn it into a park.  Ohio State has wanted to sell the land located at 2400 W. Case Road since 2016.

 

William Lane and Arla Lane donated the property to the university in 1954.  Ohio State uses the land for its sheep program and to produce forage for its beef cattle.  The sale would move farm animals off the property and the city would develop it into public park space

 

Community members in the area have been after the city for years to purchase the land.  "Myself and number of members in the community have been advocating the city buy the sheep farm and turn it into a community hub," said Roy Wentzel of the Columbus Northwest Blues, a neighborhood grassroots group in the area. "We’d like to see a library or rec center."

 

MORE: https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/07/25/city-intends-to-buy-ohio-state-university-sheep.html

 

Just when you think there's a happy ending to the City of Columbus purchasing Ohio State's 57.7-acre sheep farm property, there's a hitch.  Last week there was news that Columbus might sell off all but 8.7 acres of the sheep farm property to Upper Arlington and Dublin City Schools:

 

https://www.dispatch.com/news/20180926/columbus-plan-to-sell-off-most-of-its-sheep-farm-purchase-upsets-neighbors

 

According to the above linked Dispatch article, Columbus might sell off 34 acres of the sheep farm property to the City of Upper Arlington to build an athletics field complex on the property that would give first priority for their use to its residents.  Another 15 acres would go to Dublin City Schools to be used to expand its schools.

 

Selling off 49 of the 57.7 acreage would help Columbus pay for the property acquisition and help pay for parkland improvements, including a proposed shelter house, on the remaining 8.7 acres.  But the northwest side neighbors are upset because they thought the entire 57.7 acres would be used as a larger Columbus park, instead of just a 8.7-acre portion.

 

The ordinance to purchase to sheep farm property from Ohio State was approved by Columbus City Council on Monday.  But the deal has not yet closed, and the proposed sales to Upper Arlington and Dublin City Schools have not been finalized:

 

https://www.dispatch.com/news/20181001/northwest-side-residents-say-columbus-plan-to-sell-most-of-sheep-farm-b-a-a-ad-idea

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I take issue with the article headline below - it is really about three cities (Columbus, Akron & Barberton) challenging a new state law allowing private property owners to cut down trees and remake the city-owned buffer land surrounding city-owned reservoirs.  The State of Ohio recently passed this law - because freedom?

 

Despite the headline, its an otherwise fine rundown of the issue:

 


Property owners fight city restrictions on buffer land around reservoirs

By Beth Burger, The Columbus Dispatch

Updated: Sept 24, 2018 - 6:26 AM

 

The shorelines of Columbus’ three drinking water reservoirs have changed dramatically in the past 20 years.  In many cases, neatly cut grass used to go to the water’s edge.  There was no distinction between private property owners’ lawns and the small portion of the city’s land bordering the water that ranges from 5 to 250 feet .

 

In places where the city’s rules are being followed, now wildflowers and young sapling trees are growing.  The small strip of property serves as a vegetative buffer and natural filtration system to help keep the water safe from fertilizers and other pollutants in the city’s three reservoirs — Griggs, Hoover and O’Shaughnessy — that provide drinking water to 1.2 million people in Central Ohio.

 

But how that small portion of city property should look and what should be growing on it has been at the center of litigation in Franklin County Common Pleas Court for the past three years.  On Sept. 14, Common Pleas Judge Michael J. Holbrook said he would be rendering a decision in the case involving the cities of Columbus, Akron and Barberton and the defendant, the State of Ohio.  “This case, no matter what I decide, will be going to the court of appeals and Ohio Supreme Court,” he said.

 

A few years ago Ohio’s Republican controlled assembly included a provision in the state budget allowing landowners whose properties abut the cities’ property near the city-owned reservoirs to mow grass, cut down trees and other vegetation.  Some landowners wanted an access to the water to install docks or create a waterfront view.  The law would prevent cities from taking any action against the private landowners if they make changes to the city’s property.  The cities jointly filed a lawsuit which halted the law from going into effect.  In Columbus, the issue affects about 900 private property owners along the reservoirs.

 

MORE: https://www.dispatch.com/news/20180923/property-owners-fight-city-restrictions-on-buffer-land-around-reservoirs

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Update on the Microliving at Long & Front project.  Photo below shows the three handsome older buildings along Long Street that are currently being renovated for this 37-unit apartment project with ground-floor office/retail. (There is also a one-story facing Front Street that was renovated and houses Cravings Cafe.)  The Dispatch article talks about the project and also contains an interesting slideshow of "The Rooming House" four-story building located at 35 W. Long Street when it was a slum-like flop house in 2002:

 

43310494870_a81d919fe3_o_d.png

 

Downtown micro-unit apartments tout minimalist living

By Megan Henry, The Columbus Dispatch

Updated: Oct. 4, 2018 - 9:21 AM

 

At Microliving at Long & Front, it’s all about the little things.  The smallest apartment in the building will be 307 square feet, and about half of the 37 apartments are less than 400 square feet.  “It’s a minimalist way of living,” said Brad DeHays, project developer of Connect Real Estate.

( . . . )

The apartments may be small, but the project wasn’t.  Microliving at Long & Front is housed in four old buildings DeHays acquired four years ago on the southeast corner of Long and Front streets — the Ohio Finance building, the Gaetz Music House, Cravings Cafe and the Rooming House. ... Microliving at Long & Front will be completed in May 2019 and pre-leasing will start in December 2018.  The buildings will have offices and retail on the first floor, but none of the commercial tenants have been finalized. 

( . . . )

This will be Connect Real Estate’s second micro-apartment complex.  Microliving at 260 S. 4th opened about two years ago with 52 units.  The complex is full, but DeHays said it took longer to lease than he expected.

 

MORE: https://www.dispatch.com/business/20181004/downtown-micro-unit-apartments-tout-minimalist-living

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On 5/7/2018 at 1:40 PM, Columbo said:

Mount Carmel East is in the midst of a $310 million renovation project that started in 2015.  A remodeled lobby at the hospital opened May 4 and a 5-story tower with 128 rooms and a surgical suite with 13 operating rooms is scheduled to open in June.

 

The work on the facility at 6001 E. Broad Street is part of a $700 million project to expand and modernize three hospitals in the Mount Carmel Health System – Mount Carmel East, Mount Carmel Grove City and Mount Carmel West:

 

http://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20180503/mount-carmel-east-new-lobby-ready-tower-opens-in-june

 

Business First had a slideshow of the new 5-story patient tower built at Mount Carmel East and an update about the renovation work being done in the rest of the hospital:  https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/10/08/mount-carmel-sets-record-revenue-widens-margin-in.html

  • Mount Carmel East's patient tower opened in June, right before the end of the fiscal year.  The first phase in the hospital's $310 million transformation features sunlit, spacious, private rooms.  Construction started immediately on the next stage - gutting and rebuilding rooms in the 1972 tower - making a total of 381 private rooms when the project is complete next year.

30307735597_23c508364c_b_d.jpg

 

The new 5-story patient section is at the extreme left in the above image next to the original 1972 section of Mount Carmel East that is currently being renovated.  The below image shows a closer view of the new 5-story patient wing that was completed earlier this year:

 

30307732407_0a940ec7f5_b_d.jpg

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New Plan Calls for Aviation Hall of Fame at Historic Terminal

 

The latest plan for the original Port Columbus Air Terminal calls for the historic building to serve as the home of a new entity, the Ohio Air & Space Hall of Fame.

 

The building, located at 4920 E. Fifth Ave, boasts a long and interesting history. It was used as the main terminal for the airport from 1929 to 1958, hosted early aviation pioneers like Charles Lindberg and Amelia Earhart, and served as the initial transfer point in the nation’s first transcontinental air service.

 

There have been multiple efforts through the years to restore the building and find a suitable tenant for it.

 

Heartland Bank was interested in using the building and an adjacent hangar for its headquarters, but abandoned those plans in late 2015 after it became clear that retrofitting the hangar building would be too expensive.

 

More below:

https://www.columbusunderground.com/new-plan-calls-for-aviation-hall-of-fame-at-historic-terminal-bw1

 

Original-Port-Columbus-Air-Terminal-1150

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22 hours ago, jonoh81 said:

That concrete wall is awful.  It makes the space look private and off limits to the public. 

I would consider that this is in the early/mid construction phase, this could be said for just about any project in the raw materials construction process.  Considering the wall portion is going in front of a huge surface parking lot I don't think it's implying an "off limits" feel.  I also anticipate that as they put a more polished/colored finish on the concrete and incorporate the paths and landscaping this will soften it as well.  The angle of the picture may be a bit misleading too as to how far back and curved the wall is.  Attaching above renderings for reference...

SJP1.jpg

SJP2.jpg

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^^ That perspective does help. It really shows the wall is between the parking lot and the park and not between the park and Broad, which is how it looks in the first pic.  What looks to be an entrance to the park on the right is actually a way of leaving the park and entering the parking area-the first pic is very misleading looking.

 

And that raw bare concrete does look bad as it is. Does anyone know what material they are going to use to darken it as shown in the renderings? Will it be just paint of something else?

 

Is that a mural on it?

Edited by Toddguy
blah blah blah

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On 10/22/2018 at 5:31 PM, jonoh81 said:

That concrete wall is awful.  It makes the space look private and off limits to the public. 

 

The parks is now "finished and open" and it's just... really bad. They ended up leaving all the concrete bare aside from the front where they just attached a vinyl wrap with text and graphics, which looks really cheap. I was always indifferent about this little park but now seeing what they're calling finished, not a fan. 

Edited by DevolsDance

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44720853125_b4f2c84ecb_d.jpg

 

It looks like the Social Justice Park is open, but its not quite finished yet.  Above is a photo of a temporary mural being installed from this Dispatch article about its dedication on Sunday:  https://www.dispatch.com/news/20181028/mural-at-new-park-honors-columbus-social-justice-pioneers

 

According to the article, "The mural will be replaced by a permanent piece of art that has yet to be selected".  The article also said that "the park planning board has raised about $1 million of the $3.7 million goal for the park’s construction, programs and endowment" and gave this website for more information:  http://www.socialjusticepark.org/

 

Although the park isn't 100% complete, the people behind it said in the article “We did’t want to wait forever ... We wanted to get it open to the public as soon as possible.”

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Well thank God this is not the final 'complete' version and they (hopefully) can raise the rest of the money to finish it. So basically it is open but NOT finished...

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On 8/1/2018 at 1:51 PM, Columbo said:

Update on this proposed land sale posted previously in this thread at https://www.urbanohio.com/forum/index.php/topic,419.msg908829.html#msg908829

 

41978362040_2a4c631cc3_o_d.png

 

43786759071_dfb93499a8_b_d.jpg

 

City intends to buy Ohio State University sheep farm, turn it into a park

 

The city wants to purchase a 58-acre sheep farm near Ohio State University's Don Scott Field in northwest Columbus and turn it into a park.  Ohio State has wanted to sell the land located at 2400 W. Case Road since 2016.

 

William Lane and Arla Lane donated the property to the university in 1954.  Ohio State uses the land for its sheep program and to produce forage for its beef cattle.  The sale would move farm animals off the property and the city would develop it into public park space

 

Community members in the area have been after the city for years to purchase the land.  "Myself and number of members in the community have been advocating the city buy the sheep farm and turn it into a community hub," said Roy Wentzel of the Columbus Northwest Blues, a neighborhood grassroots group in the area. "We’d like to see a library or rec center."

 

MORE: https://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2018/07/25/city-intends-to-buy-ohio-state-university-sheep.html

 

On 10/3/2018 at 3:51 PM, Columbo said:

 

Just when you think there's a happy ending to the City of Columbus purchasing Ohio State's 57.7-acre sheep farm property, there's a hitch.  Last week there was news that Columbus might sell off all but 8.7 acres of the sheep farm property to Upper Arlington and Dublin City Schools:

 

https://www.dispatch.com/news/20180926/columbus-plan-to-sell-off-most-of-its-sheep-farm-purchase-upsets-neighbors

 

According to the above linked Dispatch article, Columbus might sell off 34 acres of the sheep farm property to the City of Upper Arlington to build an athletics field complex on the property that would give first priority for their use to its residents.  Another 15 acres would go to Dublin City Schools to be used to expand its schools.

 

Selling off 49 of the 57.7 acreage would help Columbus pay for the property acquisition and help pay for parkland improvements, including a proposed shelter house, on the remaining 8.7 acres.  But the northwest side neighbors are upset because they thought the entire 57.7 acres would be used as a larger Columbus park, instead of just a 8.7-acre portion.

 

The ordinance to purchase to sheep farm property from Ohio State was approved by Columbus City Council on Monday.  But the deal has not yet closed, and the proposed sales to Upper Arlington and Dublin City Schools have not been finalized:

 

https://www.dispatch.com/news/20181001/northwest-side-residents-say-columbus-plan-to-sell-most-of-sheep-farm-b-a-a-ad-idea

 

https://www.dispatch.com/news/20181023/columbus-wont-be-selling-portion-of-sheep-farm-to-upper-arlington

 

Like the headline says, Columbus won't be selling off a 34-acre portion of the Sheep Farm property to Upper Arlington after all.  After much neighborhood neighborhood opposition, the City of Columbus is dropping plans to sell off a majority of the 57.7-acre OSU Sheep Farm property to UA - who had plans to develop an athletic complex for use by UA residents.  Plans to sell 15 acres of the site to Dublin City Schools are still in the works however.  Dublin City Schools would like to expand on this property next to the Wright Elementary School, which is an existing Dublin City School building adjacent to the Sheep Farm property.

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